Garage Security

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How vulnerable are garage workshops due to the ability of an intruder to get through the garage door? I hear stories of garage doors spontaneously opening, due to other garage doors using the same codes or some stray electromagnetic interference. My own door will occasionally lower to about a foot off the ground and then reverse itself (only in wet weather). If I don't stay to watch it, I might leave home with the door fully open.
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I certainly wouldn't trust my tools to the vagaries of an automatic garage door. I disabled the automatic door opener the minute I started using the stand alone building as a shop and installed an alarm system.
Bought the parts from a local security store, ran the wiring for the two 'zones' (garage door and walk-in door), and installed the detectors, siren, keypad and control box myself in less than a day, including a dedicated circuit off my sub-panel, all for about $200.
This was a few years back, so it is probably cheaper by now.
FWIW, a C-Clamp, clamped to the roller track, and positioned just above one of the rollers when the door is closed, is a pretty effective way to keep a garage door from being opened from the outside, alarm system or no.
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Mon, Jan 9, 2006, 6:23am (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Swingman) doth sayeth: <snip> FWIW, a C-Clamp, clamped to the roller track, and positioned justabove one of the rollers when the door is closed, is a pretty effective way to keep a garage door from being opened from the outside, alarm system or no.
That'll work, but I prefer drilling a hold thru, and using a padlock - then in case they get inside, they still can't open the door - at least without bolt cutters, or some effort.
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"? - Granny Weatherwax
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2006 02:36:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Our local tea-leaves are pretty unsophisticated. They won't try to spoof the radio on an automatic door, they'll just kick a hole in it. Domestic-grade automatic doors are pretty lightweight construction, usually fibreglass panels a foot or two high.
Given the choice I'd go for an inherently stronger door (i.e. steel, which I can weld an internal grid into) even if this meant losing the auto-opener. After all, if it's a workshop and not for parking, I don't really need an opener.
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(J T)

Maybe. But that might put you into the same "boat" as the apocryphal type who built a cabin cruiser hull in his basement and then had to tear down a wall to get it outside. Something over 50 years ago, I knew a guy who did something similar, but he PLANNED to tear the wall out. No other place to build the boat, so...at that time, I was too young and stupid to consider just what his wife must have thought about the whole enterprise.
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"Charles Self" wrote in message

Sorry to say that I actually did that once.
Not a boat, but a birdcage. In Jr. HS metal shop. Stupid damn shop teacher.
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2006 12:08:04 GMT, "Charles Self"

I can still have an opening door - but a heavy one-piece door with internal reinforcement that I have to lift myself, not on a motor.
My Dad's shed (commercial truck-size) has a big steel roller door, with electric lift. These are great fun - a few hundred bucks for a new motor every time it dies (regularly) and a minor parking accident can bend the lower strips which needs the whole thing lifting down to repair it.
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2006 12:08:04 GMT, "Charles Self"

Many years ago ferro-cement boats were pretty popular for home-builders. The thing with them was that the hull had to cure for a year before being moved. A guy of my acquaintance built one in his backyard, planning to bring it out via the vacant lot next to his house. You guessed it - during the ensuing year someone bought that lot and built a house on it, leaving him with the only option being to remove part of his garage to get it by.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
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Tue, Jan 10, 2006, 12:43pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@bendcable.com (TimDouglass) doth state: Many years ago ferro-cement boats were pretty popular for home-builders. The thing with them was that the hull had to cure for a year before being moved. <snip>
Nothing I've ever read on the subject ever stated anything like that. What's your reference?
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"? - Granny Weatherwax
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2006 18:08:58 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Just what some of the Puget Sound area amateur boat builders told me back in the 70s. I've never tried to build one so never researched it. Concrete has a pretty dramatic curing curve for several months after it is "hard", but I don't know really how long it should be. But every one of the guys I knew who built or had a friend who built a ferro-cement boat aged the hull a year before moving.
Whether it is necessary or not, by friend thought it was and ended up "remodeling" in order to remove his boat from the back lot.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
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it does almost all of it's curing in the first 40 days. when building a boat, a builder would be lucky to fit out the interior and deck in a year, so that's probably where that time period came from. it can't be launched until it has a deck, and it usually doesn't have a deck until it's got most of the interior done.

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On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 11:19:54 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

From one of my books:
"Mixed with sufficient water and prevented from drying out, concrete grows harder and stronger with the passage of time. The process is called curing and starts sometime after final set and continues for years, perhaps indefinitely. the gain in strength is most rapid at first, tapering off until it becomes almost imperceptible after the first few years. Typically, concrete that exhibits a compressive strength of 1,500 psi three days after pouring resists 2,000 psi after seven days, 4,000 psi after twenty-eight days, 5,000 psi after three months and 5,500 psi after one year."
"Drying can be prevented by covering the concrete with a waterproof covering, wet newspapers, wet straw, or sawdust or by sprinkling it frequently with water after it has gone well beyond initial set."
It looks from that like you could do OK after just three months. As to the time it takes to fit the deck and interior, most of those I had acquaintance with had the hull made up then they sat with a gradually shredding tarp over them for the requisite year. I believe the conventional wisdom was that you didn't want to work in them until they had finished that year of curing. Oddly enough, several that I observed had the deck made of concrete as well and it was laid up at the same time as the hull - with suitable access holes for getting motors and such in. At least on had the basic cabin made from F-C, but I would think that would be moving more weight up high than is ideal.
F-C boat construction is a fascinating thing. Years ago I thought I wanted to build one, so hung out with a bunch of boat builders. The fact that they were all missing at least one finger from either the bandsaw or the centerboard cable gave me reason to re-consider.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
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Concrete is one of the real oddities of the construction world. It cures forever, or seems to. I've seen carpenters fooling around who would just use the side of their hammer to push regular nails into 3 day old concrete. Come back 30 days later and you have to use hardened nails. In 30 years, you'd best use a powder actuated gun.
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Wed, Jan 11, 2006, 9:53am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@bendcable.com (TimDouglass) did stateth: <snip> Whether it is necessary or not, by friend thought it was andended up "remodeling" in order to remove his boat from the back lot.
Don't think so. Don't know if the Chinese are still making barges out of it, but they did - and they "aged" them for about a week, buy sinking them in the water, then put them to use. And, during WWI they made Liberty Ships from it, and they didn't have a year to waste. I know the Navy spearmented for awhile, and they wouldn't have wasted a year.
Must be tons of stuff on the web about it, but I think I still have my references. May check it out later. If you've never read much on it, fascinating. They've even made boats/floats with 1/4", that quarter inch, walls. The Rooshians salvaged a boat that had been trapped thru the winter on a river. Took a bucket of sand, some cement, and water, to patch it, and it was ready to go.
Sometimes it even amazes me, some of the stuff I've researched - and even still have material on. I might not know a whole lot about very many things, but I do know a little about a whole lot.
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"? - Granny Weatherwax
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On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 14:07:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

I think application would make quite a bit of difference. A thick-walled river barge is a bit different from a 3/4" thick hull for an ocean-going sailboat. On the Liberty ships the concrete was used as a combination of reinforcing and dampening between two layers of steel plates (maybe 1/2" or better) near the screw. It was a layer up to about 6" thick IIRC and significantly reduced the engineering complexity of bracing for the torque effects of a single screw on a medium sized cargo vessel.

That's one of the reasons why F-C boats were pretty popular. I don't hear much about them any more (but don't live near the ocean either) so they may not be as popular as they were 30 years ago.

I know what you mean.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 15:42:26 -0800, Tim Douglass

Not so different. I've never seen an amateur boatbuilder's first concrete hull that was anything like 3/4" thin! I have however seen some plug-ugly concrete hulls.
When I lived on the Seine (17m steel hull - ex Dutch Navy) we used to moor near one with all the charm of a nuclear bunker. On the other side was a houseboat converted from a barge oiltank - that looked positively charming in comparison. Just a few posts down was allegedly where Catherine Deneuve lived, but I can't say we ever saw her. Mind you, all the women in Neuilly looked like Catherine Deneuve.
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Thu, Jan 12, 2006, 3:42pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@bendcable.com (TimDouglass) done writ: <snip> On the Liberty ships the concrete was used as a combination ofreinforcing and dampening between two layers of steel plates (maybe 1/2" or better) near the screw. <snip>
Check this. http://www.concreteships.org/history /
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"? - Granny Weatherwax
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 23:31:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Interesting. I didn't know about any of those concrete ships. I would point out, however, that none of them are Liberty ships, which were a specific class of welded steel ship built during the Second World War. They were the first all-welded steel ships and the first built using modular construction. Credit Henry Kaiser with inventing a lot of the mass-production methods for them. My exposure to the Liberty ships was via the shipyard where my father was working scrapping them out.
See this for a lot about the Liberty ships: http://organizations.ju.edu/fch/1994pelt.htm
Including this: According to Evon Brewton, their slow speed made Liberty Ships "sitting ducks for submarines. So all ships were reinforced by concrete from [the] bottom up to three feet above water line. . . ."
I don't recall any concrete anywhere except around the screw area, so I question this particular assertion, at least as a general statement about the ships.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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"J T" wrote in message

Yabbut, once they're in a shop they generally have all the tools they need to break into/out of Ft Knox.
I position a C-clamp slightly above a roller so that the door can actually be opened if they get past the lock ... opened just far enough to set off the alarm, which is train whistle loud.
If they're going to steal my tools, I'd like to at least fuck with the bastards a little.
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Yeah.. it would be nice to have them discover that the shop kitty was a lion.. *g* How about a power door closeing/locking device that goes off with the alarm, like some jewelry stores have? lock the bad guyz in until the neighbors get there with their torches and pitchforks..
I think the bottom line is that locks only keep honest people and beginners out... if they know what's in the garage and want to get in, they will..
I'm lucky to live in a pretty crime free neighborhood with good neighbor support, but if they want to get in, they'll find a way... (and my homeowner's policy needs to have an updated list of tools.. good reminder!)
mac
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