framing question for wall access to entertainment center

We ahve come to realize that we need rear access ot the netertainment components, would be attic access. Am thinking of cutting in sealed dorrs to TV storate space and component storate space. Teh entertainment center is builtin. So will need ot install a header and frame out the opening on the existing wall. The wall is not load bearing. I assume I could nail or screww acouple of 2x4's across and above the space where I need ot cut the exisitng studs. Would a couple of 2x4 be sufficient as the header, similar ot header over a door? Or do I need somehting more substantion. Area I need ot cut into and install a door spans about 3-4 feet across.
Chris
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From your description it sounds like you will be just fine with the 2X's. I typically put 1/2" ply between 2- 2by 4"s laid with the 3 1/2" vertical. The ply makes up the difference for the wall thickness. Not mandatory though...
RP
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RP wrote:

If you remove one stud I'd agree 2x4 is probably adequate; if you take two out (48" assuming nominal 16" spacing) I'd probably use a 2x6 given the length. And, I'd double up w/ a jack stud on the sides--that's me...so, if you do that you'll definitely want to take out two or the finished opening will be too narrow.
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Slide-outs (like drawers) or turntables are other ways to get rear access. You might also put the whole unit on rollers. Tight spaces and mirrors and flashlights are not the best kind of rear-panel wiring access provisions.
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whit3rd wrote:

And, btw, if it's so tight and no access, OP may want to consider adding ventilation/cooling while at it...
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On 8/2/2010 8:21 AM, dpb wrote:

Cables being cables, access from behind is generally better than slide-out drawers or the like unless you have a backplane that duplicates the connectors and plugs into the component. When the cables decide to get tangled, and they will, it can make pulling out a drawer or turning a turntable rather difficult.

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Mount a mirror and a laminated picture of receiver's back connection panel on the backplane for the enclosure.
Drawers or no drawers you will still need a mirror to actually see where you are plugging in that connector.
A cheap LED touch puck light may help also although the batteries will probably be dead every three years each time you want to change a connection. Perhaps a temporary unit for the first few months while the major changes are going on.
Cables being cables, access from behind is generally better than slide-out drawers or the like unless you have a backplane that duplicates the connectors and plugs into the component. When the cables decide to get tangled, and they will, it can make pulling out a drawer or turning a turntable rather difficult.

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There are solutions to this, of course. Wiring through the center of the turntable means those wires twist, but don't stretch, on rotation. A U-bend element (some systems have a light articulated arm that the wires strap to) makes the drawer solution work.
But the main solution is to have the interconnections all move as a bunch. My turntable has two VCRs, DVD, converters, switches, and a power strip. One power cord and two signal cords are the total external connection complement.
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