Fire extinguisher recommendation for a home shop

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The Home Depot ad in today's paper featured a couple of fire extinguishers, which got me to thinking.
What should I have in the way of a fire extinguisher for my shop?
It's a two car garage, where no vehicles have been parked for two years now. I have more power tools than my wife knows about, including most of the larger ones. The chip & dust collection is marginal, but on the radar for upgrade this fall. The Critter is the only spray equipment I use, and then only outside, and only for waterbased, so far.
There's a half of a Gorilla rack full of oils, varnishes, lacquers, shellac and solvents for the aforementioned. And a metal cabinet out in the back shed that should be relocated to the shop to store all of these. (Also a this fall project.)
The BORG ad is for a Kidde Class A, B, C product, $20 or so. One size fits all. (They are also selling a $300 table saw that's supposed to make you Norm, Part 2, in the same flyer.) How big an extinguisher do I need?
And, while on the subject, has anyone done anything with a remote sensing smoke detector? Where the sensor is in one place, such as the garage/shop, but the alarm also sounds another, like inside the house?)
Evidently, October is National Fire Safety Month.
Patriarch
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They sell a "kitchen size" model, get the next bigger size. If you don't have one in your kitchen, get one of those too. Yes, I've used mine, and there's no such thing as overkill when it comes to extinguishers - you want that little can to just keep spraying until your nerves calm down ;-)
The A/B/C class should be fine for woodworking. Kitchens have the same types of fires - electrical and oil.

Hardwired alarms are designed to be wired together (they use 14/3 and the red conductor is the sense wire) so that they all go off if any one sounds. You should be able to tie new alarms into your existing ones if you use this system.
Worst case, just buy two such alarms and connect them together, so that the second one sounds when the first does.
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a 10 pound ABC unit should be the minimum you should use.(I used to be in the business)
Len "patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

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You should have the biggest dry powder extinguisher you can afford to fight a fire in your flammable liquids but I also have an old pressurized water extinguisher in case I simply have a paper/wood/sawdust fire. The advantage is they are free to refill, you don't lose the whole thing the first time you pull the handle and they actually perform better on an A fire with less cleanup.
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On 23 Sep 2004 20:47:43 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote:

As long as the presence of mind is there to not use the water bottle on energized equipment or burning liquids. If bad things are progressing quickly, that presence of mind may not be around.
I vote for multiple, decent sized dry chemical extinguishers. They should be spread out, in easy to find places. I pole or wall mount mine at chest height. Extinguishers buried under scrap or in the back of the closet don't count.
Barry
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Barry notes:

Sort of like people who put the kitchen extinguisher close by the stove, where you're bound to get at least partially fried just reaching for it. Best bet: one extinguisher (minimum) each side of each entry door, plus others as needed.
Charlie Self "Half of the American people have never read a newspaper. Half never voted for President. One hopes it is the same half." Gore Vidal
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On 24 Sep 2004 11:50:18 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Right!
One of my employees recently had to extinguish a tar kettle fire with our equipment, (4) 20 LB. Halon extinguishers.
The roofers had placed both of their HUGE extinguishers right up against the kettle, making them useless once the fire started. The kettle cover jammed, so it couldn't be shut.
It took FOUR Halon bottles because the wind kept carrying the Halon away. A small dry chem would have stopped things in no time.
Barry
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...and keep in mind, a 10 pound extinguisher gives you just about exactly 10 seconds before it's empty. Bigger is better, folks.
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bigger is better and have more than one. I have 3 10lb in my basement and 2 20lb in the outside garage/shop.
"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

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I have three 10 lb extinguishers around my shop, one at each window and one at the door, I figure if the fires too much I'm goin out the window! Thats what I got insurance for. I Used to own a restaraunt and the 10 lb'ers we're required throughout, so needless to say I have many. Incedently, I popped an extinguisher about a month ago due to an errant spark hitting my staining table. Of course I just happen to have left a pan of still moist stain rag out. The A B C extinguisher really makes a mess and it only took a 1 second burst to put out the fire. But I was cleaning up the whole shop of that fine Sodium.
Searcher1

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these are Halotron I Fire Extinguisher there a little more money but there is no mess to clean up http://www.westpacmarine.com/amerex/halotron.asp or fe-36 http://www.safetyemporium.com/ILPI_SITE/WebPagesUS/results.htm&&2eiBpe0obDuox2NvxMpoLGxolobo24lauSqa6qqaWWa
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Halon extinguishers are best for stuff you care about... :-)
ken
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That depends on how long you can hold your breath.
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DJ Delorie wrote:

Huh? Halon is nontoxic. If there's enough of it to displace most of the air in a space it can smother you but that's about it. And you're not likely to manage that with a handheld extinguisher in any space with enough airflow to be able to use flammable solvents.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 22:02:04 -0400, "J. Clarke"
That depends on your halon, and whether you've done something as radical as spraying it onto a fire. The aircraft and confined-space halons (halon 1340 ?) are deliberately chosen to have less-toxic combustion by-products than the commonplace halon 1211.
I keep about 15kg of halon in the workshop, but as it's hard to replace I don't use it. I'd have to have a serious hydrocarbon fire before I went for those - little stuff or electrics would get hit with dry powder, or water for timber.
So far my only workshop fires here have been sawdust in the extractor (bucket of water) and a very small titanium fire (stand back and watch the pretty fireworks).
--
Smert' spamionam

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Your lucky, get caught with Halon here and into court you go, only a very few industries are allowed it, along with the mil and police for extingushing their comrades in riots...
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It also turns into various nasties at very high temperatures, but if you're in that hot of a fire and using an extinguisher, you're in trouble already.
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I worked in computer rooms with Halon systems for years. We got lots of pitches about how safe it was. The story goes that Halon will put out a fire at concentrations that will still allow humans to breathe (that is the design size of the system) but you are still supposed to get the hell out. The demo always showed a guy sitting in a chair while it dumped, then he gets up and walks out like nothing ever happened. I assumed that was a joke but I also understand Halon is the extingusher of choice on nuke subs so it can't be that toxic. As for the heat issues, the computer rooms were going to go off about 30-45 seconds after the detectors smelled the first whiff of smoke so the fire shouldn't be that hot yet. You had that long to hit the "abort" button if it was a false alarm. There was no mistaking the alarm. It was loud enough to make you want to evacuate or at least hit abort to stop the noise.
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Facts on HALON -- Halon is a brand name for a whole family of flourocarbon compounds. Just like 'Freon', for air-conditioner working fluid. In fact, 'Halon' and 'Freon' are cousins, as chemical compounds go. As with Freon, the number after the name identifies a specific compound. *MANY* Halon compounds are quite hazardous to breathe. There is, however, at least one that _will_ maintain a 'breathable' atmosphere, while failing to support open-flame combustion. Interestingly, Halon fire-suppression seems to work by a different mechanism than other 'extinguisher' systems. 'Traditional' systems put out a fire by either separating the fuel from the oxygen in the air, or by pulling the heat away, so that combustion is not self-sustaining. Halon seems to actually 'interrupt' the combustion process -- calling it a 'negative effect catalyst' is not too far off the mark.
The 'breathable' Halon compound _was_ more expensive than some of the other fire-suppression Halons -- which variant was deployed in any given computer facility was a choice made by that operator. Systems with the 'bad stuff' worked on a delayed-action basis -- you hit the dump switch, and the alarm went off =immediately=, telling everybody to evacuate. Then, after an 'appropriate' delay, the dump valves opened. 'Breathable' systems did _not_ have any 'evacuation' delay. Either kind of system may have had a 'warning' interval -- to allow for an abort on a false-alarm trigger.
I've been in a computer room equipped with the breathable system, when the alarm went off. Impressive! Particularly since somebody (read some idjiot :) had replaced a couple of the grid floor tiles over dump points with solid ones. They blew about 3 feet straight up in the air. Anyway, the temp in the room plummeted probably 25 degrees F, nearly instantaneously -- providing another 'good excuse' to get the h*ll out of there. That particular stuff really _is_ breathable, although it is not terribly pleasant to do so.
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That was the same thing I saw on the dump I was in. I said upthread a bit, flying debris seemed to be the biggest danger. I think this was 1301 Halon
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