Finishing question

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This application SCREAMs for poly. No way Shellac. Any fluid with any amount of water, ie vinegar, sitting on it will ruin it. It is not ONLY harmed by alcohol. Lots of solvents and any wetness will harm it significantly.
Oil varnishes will provide some varying degree resistance from some to none. Poly is bullet proof except for too much heat, as will be any of the finishes and it also will have the most resistance to heat of any.
Three choices. Poly, poly or poly. Or expoxy.
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Actually Shellac stands up better than you think. Yes it will water spot, but there won't be any water on it.
I think you should be fine with shellac. It repairs the easiest of all since a new coat melts the old. It goes over waxy substances, and grease. Yes it does, it is used as a sealer when all else fails.
So go for it.
On 12/16/2010 7:28 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

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tiredofspam wrote:

vinegar is mostly water.

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As a finisher, I must say this is the best response posted. Sure, you can put a little piece of granite, stainless, laminate, etc., on this accessory.
But since he specifically asked for a FINISH, I this is where POLYURETHANE (for the impaired cave dwellers living in 1970s woodworking fog) shines at its best.
For commonly found finishes available over the counter:
No finish is more cleanable. No finish is more resistant to chemicals. No finish is more abrasion resistant. No finish is easier to apply. For its toughness, no finish is easier to remove then reapply if needed.
You can even get some tough as nails water based that won't yellow over time such as Campbell, Sherwin Williams, etc.
Spot on there, Sonoma.
Robert
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On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 16:28:05 -0800, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

While it is true that shellac with wax in it will water spot easily, dewaxed shellac, if let dry for a few days, will not. I have tried to water spot it and failed. Drops of water left on it overnight, a sweating glass, an icecube allowed to melt, nothing caused water spotting. With our hard water some of them left mineral spots, but those wiped right off. Try it yourself - you'll be surprised.
However you are right about the solvents - I should have mentioned that. Any strong alkali, like ammonia, will harm it.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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It is a kitchen, after all. It will be cleaned. The best cleaners are really nasty stuff.
I had an article from years ago about that best kitchen cleaners (germane to my finishing business one would think I would have kept it) and how they affected the surfaces they cleaned.
When I "final clean" my jobs, I am a big proponent of 409 since it will cut oil, grease, and even take off pencil marks.
The report I had tested the cleaners to see how deep they cleaned and if they damaged surfaces. In their testing, they found 409 to be quite effective, but quite destructive. It ate off all manner of kitchen cabinet finishes, took off paint, and even etched metal.
When I pick a finish for an item, I always think of what I could put on it to make it look the best, wear the best, and what will keep me out of warranty work.
Robert
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"FrozenNorth" wrote:

---------------------------------------- IMHO, any shelf in that location is a disaster waiting to happen, especially with flammable items placed on it.
No matter what finish you choose the shelf is going to be a grease collector and any finish you choose is going to get tacky and not survive.
Lew
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Not even epoxy? :-)
Actually, I'm only half joking. As our resident epoxy expert, do you know of a fairly bullet proof epoxy or similar finish?
Luigi
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"Luigi Zanasi" wrote:

Actually, I'm only half joking. As our resident epoxy expert, do you know of a fairly bullet proof epoxy or similar finish? -------------------------------------- There is an absolutely "bullet proof" finishing system as follows:
High build epoxy primer (4-6 mils/pass) followed by linear polyurethane.
Basic yacht finish.
Two (2) problems.
Both the primer and the LP finish are pigmented resins. (Clear LP is available but you still need a primer.
Cost:
Going rate for high build epoxy primer is about $100/gal & linear polyurethane is about $200/gal.
Be a lot less costly to have a fab shop bend up a piece of 316L S/S.
Lew
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Stainless steel. Matching the cabinets won't be much of an issue when it's on fire. Put the oils somewhere else, too. The vinegar and salt might at least help to put the fire out...
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

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FrozenNorth wrote:

Poly. With a piece of clear acrylic on top so you can take it off for washing.
--

dadiOH
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@gm.nospam.ail.com says...

Best bet's probably polyurethane. A precatalyzed lacquer would also be good but it may take a week or so before you don't smell it anymore.
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On 12/17/10 11:20 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

I can deal with a week of smell, I did the recommended burn cycle on the new stove, the factory smell still comes out when I turn it on.
Thanks for all the great info and ideas, we never had anything fall off the back of the stove, so this shelf mounted to the wall would be much safer anyway.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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Reaching across a stove top with burners on is nuts anyway. Would not happen in my house. I value my (and mywife's) skin too much to risk such a thing. But don't let me stop you.
I'd use a polyurethane and let it cure for a week or so before subjecting it to the heat and vapor
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On 12/17/10 11:31 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The burner controls are back there anyway, what is the big deal, by your logic I could never turn them off.
The shelf will be above them. Anyone worried about the chance for a burn from this is either a lawyer from California or totally paranoid.

--
Froz...


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FrozenNorth wrote:

No kidding, wonder how the cave men survived? Oh thats right they didn't. Doubt it was because they were burned while grabbing the salt to season their Mammoth.
--
"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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Nope, it was from trying to collect sabretooth urine for marinade that killed them.
-- The art of life lies in a constant readjustment to our surroundings. -- Okakura Kakuzo
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wrote:

I know for a fact that not all cavemen died.
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 09:06:09 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Damn, not your old brag again...
-- If the only prayer you ever say in your whole life is "thank you," that would suffice. -- Meister Eckhart
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wrote:

Corian, all colours 1/4" 3/4" (6 mm19 mm) (All colors) FLAME SPREAD INDEX (FSI)<25 SMOKE DEVELOPED INDEX (SDI)<25
CLASS I (A)
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