Finishing question

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Just got a new stove, the back above the control panel isn't deep enough for things we like to store there. List includes olive oil, veggie oil, regular, balsamic and wine vinegar, salt and pepper.
I have the shelf made and coloured properly to match cabinets, now what to use for a clear coat? Poly, varnish, shellac or ?
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Froz...


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wrote:

My initial reaction is always shellac. But given that you might spill stuff & it will get greasy, I would day this is one place where polyurinestain (tmLJ) is justified. You might want to check if acetic acid affects it.
Luigi
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On 12/16/10 6:28 PM, Luigi Zanasi wrote:

mentioned the contents and you are right grease and misc splatters is a possibility. I was leaning towards poly, just wondering if the various oils and vinegars may be a problem. They are so handy just at the back of the stove.
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wrote:

Gas or electric? Have ever had a bottle of oil slip out of your hands onto a heat source? . . . Me neither.
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On 12/16/10 7:11 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Electric.
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Anything wood will have a short life with heat, grease and cleaning. I would not recommend it. But, if you must, I think a synthetic material such as quartz or corian, will outlast wood. Depending on how close it is to the flames or heating elements, it could catch fire or blister or scorch.
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On 12/16/10 7:24 PM, EXT wrote:

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On 12/16/10 7:30 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

amount of the oils and vinegars, it will give plenty of clearance for the burners.
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I built one from some old growth redwood over a decade ago. Finished it with Howard's Feed-n-wax. Still looking good and has held up just fine (balsamic, bowl for sea/kosher salt, salt and pepper grinders).
Mounted on the wall, about 8" above the control panel top with two keyhole slots.
scott
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@gm.nospam.ail.com says...

Shouldn't be an issue for a decent urethane.
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Oil won't harm shellac. Can't French polish without it.
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On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 17:33:16 -0500, FrozenNorth wrote:

Assuming it's dewaxed shellac all you have to worry about is heat and alcohol. Grease etc wipes off of shellac just like it wipes off of any other film finish.
But considering the shelf might lead a rough life I'd go for one of long oil varnishes (aka Danish oil) - Tried & True is my favorite but Watco is probably easier to find. That way the shelf is easily refinished.
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Try just varnish straight from the can, no thinner, no oil. Lay it on with a rag and buff until nearly dry, then repeat. Looks just like Danish oil, but builds faster and wears better. Behlen's Rockhard is great, alkyd a close second, polyurethane okay if you like a cloudy, yellow finish with a Saran wrap feel.
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On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 23:17:35 -0800 (PST), Father Haskell

I've had varnish on bookshelves get sticky on me. Rockhard and Waterlox are both tung oil and phenolic resin based and work better than most. Waterlox has products for shiny, medium, and nice, matte finishes. It's quick to apply, quick to dry, and has a very nice hand. Just Do It!
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On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 23:17:35 -0800, Father Haskell wrote:

OK, but can you just wipe on another coat when the original finish gets screwed up? Or do you have to remove the old finish first? What I've read is that of all the film finishes only shellac can be recoated as is.
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 17:54:45 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

That's a valid concern. I think the assumption here is that the varnish is plenty tough enough and it will hold up for a long time.
Tried & True is a pretty unique product. Applied correctly, it is reasonably tough stuff and easy to replenish.
I don't think you would get the same protection from Watco. Watco is mostly thinner with some linseed oil, resins and metallic dryers. I don't think it qualifies as "long oil". And I've seen cases where Watco was used and the wood easily stained with water rings.
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 00:08:17 -0800, Jim Weisgram

For most varnishes, except polyurinestain, that's true. Do a quick scuff to give it tooth, dewax it with mineral spirits (taking no chances that it got a squirt of Pledge), then rub on another coat.

I've tried honey (t&t) before and it was OK, but I much prefer Waterlox. It's much easier to rub on and I feel that it's a tougher product.

If Watco stained with water rings, it was from too few coats. It's not as sturdy, as you state, though. Other products are better.
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 05:36:07 -0800, Larry Jaques wrote:

T&T have 3 different products. Not sure which one you're referring to. I meant the oil/varnish mix. Sounds like you may have mean the oil/ beeswax mix.
I got started using T&T on bowls and such because it's non-toxic. It worked so well I started using it elsewhere. But shellac is still my favorite finish.
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 18:15:50 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

No, the 'good stuff', the varnish oil. It's thick, thick, thick, like honey which is starting to crystallize! I wonder if that can is still usable...

Waterlox Original in Satin is mine, bar none. A definite step up from Watco, especially in odor.
-- The art of life lies in a constant readjustment to our surroundings. -- Okakura Kakuzo
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In article <c3e9b771-4b2c-4ff0-994e-8e204e754525

If your polyurethane is giving you a "cloudy, yellow finish with a Saran wrap feel" perhaps you should not let the cat pee in the can next time.
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