Fence for Miter saw station?

Anyone using an after market aluminum fence on their miter saw station? I've seen a few advertised in magazines. I'm going to start planning mine and wondered if it's better to make my own fence or buy one? I'd like something that is at least 60" long on either side. I was thinking with a purchased fence, it would at least be dead on flat and I wouldn't have to worry about that aspect of the project.
Thanks
Chris
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You'll save yourself a lot of time and anguish by buying one in my opinion. There's a few types on the market that are generally popular. Biesemeyer and Unifence are two of them. They both lock down on the front rail only. A third type of fence that's not as popular, but not all that rare either is a fence that locks down both sides of the table. It's called an Excalibur which I happen to own and use. I'm happy with its operation.
You can read a comparison about the first two here. http://benchmark.20m.com/articles/UnifenceVersusBessy/unifenceversusbessy.html
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My apologies. I missed the fact this was a miter saw station. You can forget everything I've said. I was thinking tablesaw when I replied.
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"cbodnar" wrote:

A few years ago, Norm had a miter saw station project on NYW.
Might want to take a look.
Lew
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No experience with such fences but do have an opinion\input... as always.
I'm getting ready to build a station for my slider miter. I am planning on 8 feet on the in-feed side and 6 feet on the out-feed with 2 feet in the middle for the saw. I will use 3/4" MDF. I'll build an L- shaped affair with gussets for stability. It will sit on top of the table with slots in the base for front to back alignment. On the out- feed side I'll make the fence double thick. The back piece will be shorter by the depth of an aluminum T-slot channel so it can carry a flip stop. The front piece will have a ruler applied and horizontial slots so I can adjust the fence to set the ruler.
My thoughts on a miter saw are using it mostly for cutoff for near lengths and non-critical miters, etc. If I am building precise furniture or other items I try to use the TS for most of cross cuts so I am not so critical on the fence for the miter.
Flip stop: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=21332&filter=flip%20stop

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So how do you square the ends of a long board? Easy on a mitre saw, seems a bit difficult on a table saw when you have to both move the board and hold it square.
D.
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Derek Lyons wrote:

Long boards /are/ a PIA on the table saw. From the days before I had a table saw, I made a crosscut guide for a portable circular saw that had a fence for the board being cut and another to guide the saw. I'll put a photo on alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking so you can see what the "improved" version looks like.
These days I cut long boards to length by throwing 'em on the CNC and routing both ends to +/-0.0015" accuracy :)
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"Morris Dovey" wrote

Ahhhhhh...., the Morris Dovey CNC cut off saw/router. NOT portable or to be thrown into the back of a pickup.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

Would 20' capacity and under 50# qualify as "portable"? If so, it'd be easy enough to build a portable CNC cut-off machine, but why bother?
Now if I could just come up with a CNC 2x4 *straightener* :)
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On Mon, 11 May 2009 16:37:19 -0500, Morris Dovey wrote:

It would be easy enough to straighten it. Until you let it go again...
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You are correct sir. Yes I use the TS for "most" cross cuts but it's not an absolute. I will tune up the miter to make precise cuts when needed. It is capable. I typically create a fresh zero clearance insert, put on the good blade, dial in the cut angles, etc. Once it is dialed in it is pretty good for the day but I handle it pretty rough the rest of the time so the setup isn't something I want to rely on unless it has been cheked and tuned recently.
On May 11, 11:15am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Derek Lyons) wrote:

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cbodnar wrote:

To the first question, "no" personally...
As to the other, I'd ask for what end purpose you're after.
I've never seen the need for an extended fence for the miter saw--an extended support if not in fixed bench in shop, yes; longer fence itself, no.
Reason for the above is that at least for me the fence is long enough for short pieces that have precise needs such as for furniture mouldings, etc., and for the long pieces such as architectural moulding, etc., there's sufficient flexibility in the pieces themselves that getting sufficient accuracy just isn't a problem.(*)
What you're up to and how that fits obviously I don't know... :)
(*) I do make and use blocks and other fixtures to set proper angles of things like crown, etc. I just haven't ever found that I needed a fence of additional length as long as the end wasn't flopping off the end of the bench.
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I recently made a miter saw station, complete with pineywood drawers to hold stuff. The miter saw was placed with the right edge near the halfway point of the table, so there's 2' on one side of the saw and 4' on the other.
For repeat cuts, I simply screw a block into the top of the table. I've got a 4' track, but haven't installed it yet.
I'm still using the fence that came with the saw, and it works well. To make a cut, just be sure the piece is tight up against the fence and everything else works itself out. A longer fence is /not/ necessary.
One more tip: build your table so it supports the entire saw capacity. Mine aligns the front of the saw base with the front of the table, and that creates problems cutting wider pieces.
Puckdropper
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I've used the Glide Stop from http://www.jadawley.com in a few different applications and have been very happy with it. Very accurate, and pretty beefy too.
JP
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A little pricey but very very cool. More than I need for the home shop but clearly a good consideration for the production shop.
Thanks for sharing.

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I made this stand. It has served well for many years. I did design a stop on the left hand side that can tip out of the way to be able to deal with warped or twisted stock. I designed it with 2 feet on the right, the saw, the rest available on the left.
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base_images/zp/job_site_miter_saw_stand.gif
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Thanks for sharing.
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DanG wrote:

Nice illustration.
However, I'm confused by measurement "A." Assuming the material is 3/4" plywood, shouldn't "A" be minus 3/4" instead of plus?
Maybe I'm just having a brain cramp. :-)
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Interesting.
My plan is to have two tables, one at each side. Then I'll hang a platform for the saw in between them. The platform will be 1" thick (or thicker) plywood with a 2x4 running across the front and back on the underside that laps over the legs of the two tables. This will attach to the table with vertical slots in the table legs so I can adjust the height initially and when ever needed. Then the platform will have slots for the saw hold downs so I can adjust the saw front- to-back to align with the fence system..

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