Easy sanding primer

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I need a primer that sticks well (wood) and is exceptionally easy to sand. Dry sand.
International makes/used to make one that was originally developed to fill the grain on Phillipine mahogany but last I looked it was $100+ per gallon. It was wonderful, dried ready to sand in 2-4 hours (lots of xylol IIRC) but it is way too pricey. Auto body primer works but is lacquer based and meant for spraying.
I need something that can be brushed and/or rolled, don't care if it is water or oil base as long as it can be dry sanded in no more than 24 hours (the International dried in an hour or so, easily sanded in maybe 2-4 hours).
All suggestions welcome, actual experience with the recommendation counts :)
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dadiOH
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On 4/16/10 3:08 PM, dadiOH wrote:

;-)
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Have you tried shellac?
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Robert Haar wrote:

That would sand well but I need it to fill as well. Maybe Zinsser's shellac base primer? never used ot, don't know.
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dadiOH
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coats and sanding between coats.>ww
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What is the reason for priming?
Are you putting a clear coat over it, or just paint? Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Two... 1. seal the wood 2. to provide a very smooth, defect free surface for paint.

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"dadiOH" wrote:

Couple of coats of 1/2 lb shellac followed by a coat of 2 lb shellac.(Allow 24 hrs between coats).
Wait two weeks, then sand smooth with 220 grit, wipe with a tack rag and paint.
A lot less cost than shooting epoxy high build primer at $100/gal.
Lew
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For paint, these are my two favorites:
http://www.zinsser.com/product_detail.asp?ProductID 
I use this even under the high performance finishes. Actually, just about under all my painted finishes. Goes on easy, sanding time is short, and you can build up coats with it. I use it on kitchen refinishes and have never had a problem. It lays out great and sands cleanly.
The other would be the 10th one down here.
http://www.sherwin-williams.com/pro/sherwin_williams_paint/sherwin_williams_paints/primers/interior /
this might work better:
http://tinyurl.com/y7tlza9
It is the SW "Easy Sand". Good stuff if the wood isn't beat up and not too dirty.
For really rough wood, I like to prime it with the one above the Easy Sand, called the Pro Build. That stuff isn't like anything else on the market, and why they don't market the daylights out of it I don't know.
You can't spray it; it has to be rolled or brushed. It has so much silica in it, it will fill oak tubules with just a couple of coats. It dries fast, covers everything, sticks well..... I would think they would look at it as a premier product.
It is NOT good for smooth surfaces though like birch, poplar, maple, etc. It leaves the surface too rough and requires too much sanding to get back to smooth.
As always, just my 0.02.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

http://www.sherwin-williams.com/pro/sherwin_williams_paint/sherwin_williams_paints/primers/interior /
Bingo. The product data for it sounds much like the International I used to use. I suspect the shellac base Zinsser would serve too. Or plain shellac + pumice (or whiting).
Many thanks to you and all others forthe input.
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On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 13:27:22 -0400, the infamous "dadiOH"

If it's a small amount you need to fill, the blue (well, it was blue back in the late '80s) 3M sandable putty works really, really well. http://fwd4.me/8dT They appear to have a whole lot more to offer nowadays, including flowables.
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Benjamin Moores Enamel Underbody [ oil] I would use it 1-2 coat and sand with maybe 220-320, finish with Satin Impervo thinned with Penetrol to the point it was just almost to thin and the finish looks sprayed on, use Tack cloth and real good China brush. There might be other sandable primers but this stuff sands fast as thats its purpose. I have doors I can see myself in like a mirror that look great after 25 years. Only P&L Effecto and Moore Impervo line flow out perfectly, and I tried everything sold here. The Penetrol makes it work, but universal tints ruin the flowing out somewhat so factory powder pre tinted is best, like White.
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wrote:

Sherwin Williams has a very good primer formulated specfically for bare wood. It dries slowly (you will need to wait one day), oil based, very good quality.
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If you are using a pigmented paint over it (or an oil based finish such as polyurethane, boiled linseed oil, Tung oil, etc.) I'd suggest using Plaster of Paris to fill the grain first, then prime and top coat. It's cheap, fills open grain well, dries fast, sands easily (and disappears with an oil finish). Plaster of Paris was commonly used as a filler in furniture factories in the past. I've found it works great with white oak, red oak and other open grained woods under an oil finish. I've also used it to smooth out construction grade BC plywood before painting where the finish was sort of important... a rare situation but it worked fine.
John
PS, It's also better than glue and sawdust for fixing gaps in dovetailing when an oil finish is planned...
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On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 18:47:12 -0400, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Interesting. I'd heard of using pumice with shellac although I haven't yet tried it. Do you mix the plaster as you would for a normal use?
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Yup... mix it as usual or a bit looser. Spread it with a taping knife or plastic bondo spaltula and push it into the surface to insure a good fill... It dries fast and then you can sand it off.
Pumice does work with shellac. My last piece, that I had at Woodworkers Showcase, was a shellaced knitting chest made from white oak and walnut. The grain was filled with pumice.
John
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Some French polish techniques start by oiling the wood and then sprinkling on a light dusting of pumice. The pumice abrades the wood under the pad, thus creating a wood filler. I've found it faster just to lay on a few heavy coats of shellac, then wet sand with naptha and finish with a pad, no pumice, no oil, which has to be spirited off. Open grained or curly woods look deeper when you don't muddy them with an opaque paste.
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On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 15:08:51 -0400, the infamous "dadiOH"

Oh my Crom! Priming mahogany? Thats a mortal sin, innit?

What are you doing?

I recommend Waterlox Original Sealer Finish, and nothing else. Medium sheen is my fave, and I still steelwool/wax it later. It's an oil based, quick-drying finish. Rubbed, it's dry in half an hour, say I. Brushed, it's sandable-dry in 8 hours, says Waterlox. 26.3% solids. (Satin 28.1% solids) http://fwd4.me/84E
I haven't tried their TB3809 Marine Sealer (for use with their TB3940 Marine Finish), but it has 26% solids. http://www.waterlox.com/Portals/Documents/product_specs.pdf
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I've used shellac under lacquer with great results. Straight from the can, 3 lb cut, slop it on, wait a couple of hours, then sand level. This was on white oak, and the lacquer finished dead flat, like a pane of glass.
One of the guitar making sites I read recommended drywall mud (joint compound) under paint. Also good under a clear finish if you tint it with water based stain to match the wood color.
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Father Haskell wrote:

I use that (mud) sometimes, works well for smoothing and sanding but not for sealing. Of course, the first topcoat seals it but the more topcoats I have to put on the more opportunities I have for messing up :)
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