Early Projects

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On 9/27/2015 2:54 PM, BenignBodger wrote:

I only had one shop class, in 8th grade. It was in 1958-59. We all made two things, a turned bowl, which is still around, and a lamp. My lamp was the best one of the class (honest), couldn't wait to show it to my folks. The last day of school I went to get it and it was the only one left, and it was NOT mine, it was crap. (I think Scott Phillips made it) I'm still miffed about it, I bet he still has my lamp.
BTW, we did segmented bowl turning as our first project, and I don't recall wearing any safety gear, no face masks, dust masks, hearing protection, nothing, and we were a bunch goofy little kids. Our shop teacher had all his fingers, but had a wooden leg. Today, I wouldn't let kids, other than mine, in my shop, let alone 25 or so weirdo's I didn't know, all together acting like fools... Different age I guess.
--
Jack
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On 9/29/2015 7:27 AM, Jack wrote:

That would be a pisser. Getting off the point a bit, Scott Phillips really sent the message of doubt to me when I sort'a kept up with his show during the building of his brand new and relatively elaborate shop. It was not a year later I was watching the show and he had so much crap piled up that some of his machines were buried. That simply told me that he did not use the shop for anything other than a different place to film his show. You would have thought that they would have cleaned up for the show. Anyway....

it. I blame the down fall of responsibility and respect on the parents. Even when I was a kid the teacher was respected and the kids pretty much acted like they had a brain, well at least when we were in the shop. IIRC our shop teacher was missing part of one of his fingers. I do recall that I saw him doing more than just teach. We lived in a relatively new neighborhood and a block away next door to where I went to HS a large new apartment complex was being built. I saw him on the second story roof attaching faux corbels under the eaves and I acknowledged him as I walked to school. The previous year in his Jr.High shop class we spent our free time in shop class cutting out those corbels from treated fence posts on the BS. ;~)
Times have changed.
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On Saturday, September 26, 2015 at 11:18:21 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Spent the weekend out of town, 45th class reunion, so I'm just now respondi ng.
Other than building fences, repairing barns, etc., my first project was a s ide table, in 9th grade Industrial Arts class. I had no idea what a dowel rod was, then, so on the top of the legs, I carved a dowel protrusion on t he end of the legs, to fit into the tables' hole. The teacher made a poi nt of showing the class what I did. I don't think the table exists anymor e. I think I tossed this table in the fire about 7 yrs ago, when cleaning out the old barn.
I do have my first picture frame, though. It holds a pic of my Dad, who p assed away when I was young. The picture hangs in my old shop. I need t o place it in my newer shop.
On behalf of a non-participant, here, Mom was (girls were) not allowed to t ake shop, when she was in school. She had to wait for her brothers to fin ish the class, before walking home with them. She was able to sneak a proj ect in, while waiting. I'm thinking 1942 she finished high school. She m ade a small book case for her books. She still has the book case.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote:

Our 60th was this month.
Lew
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My Earliest was a chicken coop up against the shop. I was 5 or 6 likely six. I got my drill press / drill / table saw / all in one machine from a newspaper add with the money Granddad left me. I still have parts for it, the all metal high speed motor finally died and I was glad. Holding a high speed drill with your hand and the bearings were 50+ years old took some steel.
The one Mom was proud of was maybe 10/12 somewhere in there when I took a single horn side of a dear rack and mounted it to (threaded the bone!!!) the top of three offset and decreasing diameters of turned oak wood. Then I put Mahogany varnish. It sits in my workroom as both Mom who used it for her necklaces dad kept his bola ties. I use it as a hat rack now.
It was my first turning project - bolt through the center except for the small one that was a face plate screw affixed.
Martin
On 9/26/2015 11:18 AM, Leon wrote:

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On 9/26/2015 12:18 PM, Leon wrote:

My first project was a napkin holder, made in shop class in the seventh grade. A bottom with two vertical sides glued onto it. I decided to make my sides trapezoidal, one angled up, one angled down. An odd choice, but creative, I suppose.
It was the bottom that was the real challenge. Our teacher gave us a board perhaps 10" x 6" x 1/2". We had to plane one edge to be straight, square and smooth; jointing it by hand, in other words. We'd make a bunch of shavings, then take the piece up to the teacher for inspection with a try square. He'd mark the high spots with the edge of a pencil and we'd try again.
I probably don't need to tell you how many times most of us had to repeat this process before the board passed muster. I was proud that my napkin holder would fit about 2" of napkins; better than most. Some of the kids planed their boards down to nothing and had to start again.
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On 9/29/2015 9:09 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

LOL. So you built a napkin holder and many others built "mulch".
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*snip*

Or fire starters. Of all the tool scraps, I think plane shavings work the best. :-)
Puckdropper
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On 9/29/2015 11:24 AM, Leon wrote:

Almost correct. Industrious tyke that I was, I made *both*. :)
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On 9/26/2015 12:18 PM, Leon wrote:

Don't have the first project. Pool cue rack made of scrap shoe molding found at a nearby home construction site. Hacked into pieces with a pruning saw and nailed together for a Father's Day present. Very bad design since the cues were stored horizontally, leading to some very curved cues. Fortunately, the cues and table were very cheap and Dad wasn't much of a player. Probably made when I was ten.
About a year later, I made this toy boat, which I still have in the basement storage, rotten rigging and all... https://flic.kr/p/yhAbLy
Plans were from a library book, guidance from Dad, but he had me do all the actual work, after showing me how on scrap. The showing part was important because much of the work was done on his DeWalt 1400 RAS. Basic shaping of the redwood hull with the jigsaw attachment after ripping and crosscutting a 4x4 to size. Further refinement and hollowing with a coping saw, chisels and sandpaper. Tapered the mast and booms with the disc sander attachment. Edge treatment on the stand with the molding head. (I remember that as being a bit scary.) Made a form and used a tin can on our Coleman camp stove to melt the lead for the keel weight. Had some awkwardness pouring the lead because the leather gloves were too big. Mom made the sails. I never finished the rudder system - testing in the bathtub showed an uncorrectable 30º starboard lean.
Different times.
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