Drying red oak in a kitchen oven

Hello All,
I have several stacks of 1 1/2"x4"x30" pcs of red oak from a tree we took down about 6 months ago. they've been stickered and stacked in the basement near the furnace to dry. I have a project which would use about 12 pieces but I know the wood is not yet sufficiently dry. I'm wondering if I might accellerate the drying process by using a kitchen oven. Has anyone tried this and if so, would you share the process, upside and downside? Thanks.
Harry VanW.
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wrote:

Well, the biggest downside I can see is that they probably aren't going to fit into your oven. :-)
I'd be very concerned about drying it too fast, and causing it to check and crack. Perhaps your library has a copy of "Fine Woodworking on Wood and How to Dry It". Or see http://www.ripsaw.com/woodbook.html -- it's also available from Amazon.
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Not a good idea. The wood will warp and the interior cell will not dry out consistently. Kiln dryers heat the wood to about 140 Deg. and have a dehumifier to suck out the water. My brother has one, it takes around 2 weeks for a stack of green wood.

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Lowest possible heat, the lowest heat, with the door closed, otherwise with the door open it will keep working to attain the set heat and hence, way over heat. It is something to experiment with on worthless greenwood FIRST but I would also tend to agree with Harry, the dehumidifier should be a serious nessesity though I don't think your amount of wood would take that long at those sizes, per small batch. Trying this I would use that stuff that is painted onto end-grain to keep it from splitting, unless it is made for air drying only of course... I don't think it'll work, honestly.
--
Alex
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with the

heat.
would
nessesity
sizes,
end-grain
course... I don't

The heat _is_ the dehumidification. You merely need to vent the moist heated air. For those who want a bit more systematic approach to kiln-drying http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/publications.html has great information.
BTW, oak is one of the most difficult woods to dry because it tends to honeycomb - ray figure splitting.
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I know that, but you have an enclosed heated environment of heat from which the humidity must be removed, hence.

A wild goose chase in the needs of a simple and quick solution...$$$

So, won't that end-grain sealer work on the "warm" setting?

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Alex
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which
No knowledge is a goose chase. Even if you think you've got it all.
Had you studied wood, you'd know what honeycomb is, and that it is the most common oak degrade. End checks are self-limiting by the nature of their origin.
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Oh that's good George... anyone can tell how oak dries by "looking" at the bundled firewood at your local supermarket. It's obvious. And frankly, had you studied common sense you wouldn't be screaming
"NATIONAL STUDY OF WOOD DRYING ON A GOV'T WEBSITE"
towards the idea of a quick solution for a little stickered stack. Lighten up, it's just a little human situation.
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Alex
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bundled
studied
up, it's

Faint hope that the original poster might have found dry kiln schedules published in that material of some aid. You know, approached it sensibly, armed with knowledge versus bullshit.
I see you are beyond help until you realize you realize how much you need.
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Sat, Feb 5, 2005, 10:54am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@thinkso.com (Scrub) wonders: <snip> I'm wondering if I might accellerate the drying process by using a kitchen oven. <snip>
I've heard of drying wood in a microwave, but don't recall hearing about drying in a kitchen ovenr.
But, before you listen to everyone that'll tell you it can't be done, why don't you give it a shot first, and tell us how it works out.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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