drill presses

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I Googled rec. woodworking and "drill presses" but didn't find much. My 30 year old Craftsman is sick. Too many parts need to be replaced so I'm looking for a new drill press. Up to $999. Any recommendations?
Max
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Max wrote:

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Max wrote:

not enough information there to make any meaningful recommendation.
radial drills are nice for being able to drill wide stock and angled holes, but they tend to lack rigidity. I really like my mill/drill, and a used one will be in your price range, but it 'aint even slightly portable (which might or might not matter to you.) a nice stout 50s era floor stand press is a good all around machine, but might be hard to come by. the chinese have done a pretty good job copying those, and grizzly carries a fairly complete line of that, so if that's what you're looking for, grizzly might be a pretty good place to start looking: <http://www.grizzly.com/products/mach-specs.aspx?key80000>
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The Grizzly model #G0482 looks good. I'm not at all familiar with Grizzly products. Are they good quality?
Max
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Compared to what? They definitely can be. Their low-end stuff is definitely low-end. However, much of the higher-end stuff (any DP over $500, for sure) seems to be good quality and a good value, from what I've read and my own limited experience. I have one of their 16" bandsaws (maybe 10 yrs old) and it's very solid with lots of cast iron, yet adjustable so it can be tuned/tweaked as necessary. I've been very happy with it. Popular Woodworking recently published an "Endurance Test" on the Grizzly G7944 Drill Press ($250ish), and they liked it a lot. Some quotes: "powerful, accurate, and a dang good deal... I recommend it without reservation... a solid machine at a super price". (Note that they do publish ads for Grizzly, if you're cynical about that sort of thing). The quill travel on this model (3.25"?) leaves a bit to be desired, and even their $600 model only has 4.75". But if you look around the archives here, I think you'll generally find praise for Grizzly's higher-end equipment, and especially for their customer service. As far as tables, I'd imagine you'd want to make or buy a larger table for almost any DP if you want to do much serious woodworking with it. Mine is melamine-coated particle board with aluminum t-tracks and a fence, with replaceable square inserts in the middle, which also allow a sanding drum to be used flush with the surface of the table. Good luck, Andy
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If you are going to go with a Grizzly, take a look at the slightly more expensive G0521. Amazing machine for the price IMHO. 3 Phase motor I think though... By more expeisive, I mean $1200 after shipping and all...
It has two interesting features in that it is capable of being run in "tap" mode where the motor automatcially reverses rotation at a pre-set depth so you can tap holes automatically... And it has a qull stabilizer which means that anything you clamp to the quill can be made to stay rock solid. i.e. mortising attachment or multiple spindle head.
But note that it is a VERY heavy machine... And they only import 3-4 at a time for re-sale... And I've told a dozen customers about them in the past week.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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My son-in-law bought a G04582 a couple of years ago and it is a good machine. I was amazed at the value. Grizzly is like any of the tool manufactureres - some dogs and some very good equipment. I have owned one of their 1023S cabinet saws for about five years and would match it with anything in the $1,000 to $1,700 price range. It cost $900 (with shipping) when I bought it. My son in law also bought one of their G0500 8" jointers at the same time and it is a jewel. Even Fine Woodworking judged it a best pick in one of their tool reviews. And they don't even advertise Griz.
RonB
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Max wrote:

I have a 8" grizzly jointer and a 15" grizzly planer. I also have a delta contractor's saw and two delta drill presses, the benchtop 12" and the cheaper varible speed floor standing model. The bench top delta is surprisingly good. No runout. A little under powered. The floor standing model is good as well.
I'm also very happy with both my grizzly tools. I'd say the quality is about even between griz and delta. Although the grizzly tools will have chinese motors if that matters to you (it doesn't to me so far). My porter cable 80gal compressor has a brazilian motor. In a production environment, maybe it matters. But I can't tell the difference between any of them in normal operation.
I went with the delta floor standing DP because the cheapest variable speed grizzly DP at the time was around $1500. I paid about $450 or so for mine. If VS doesn't matter to you, I wouldn't hesidate to get the grizzly DP. They have a good reputation for customer service and have been around quite a while now.
The only issue I've heard with buying from them is that the shipping companies are often rough with the packages. Some people have received boxes torn open with missing parts or severe damage. Grizzly is good about fixing the situation when this happens. Both of my griz tools arrived in plywood boxes with no damage at all.
brian
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Max wrote:

Don't know if it's what I want yet, but Pop Wood just listed Delta's new "Drill Presses for Woodworkers" in their Best New Tools column. Table tilts in two directions, T-slots, replaceable insert in the table center, easy-clamp edges, and a 6-inch stroke. One 17" model and two 20's.
Laser is optional. :-)
I'd like to know more about these babies. The article didn't happen to mention what they cost. A quick run on The Google puts the 17'' at around 4 hundred, or 500 if you want to spend more.
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The new DP by Steel City Toolworks looks pretty sharp - heavy duty, 6" quill stroke, less than $500 IIRC. http://www.steelcitytoolworks.com /
If I needed a DP, and I couldn't find a good 50-year old behemoth, I'd definitely look there. Then Grizzly. Totally depends on what you need it for, though. Andy
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The Steel City DP looks pretty good. Good numbers. I would prefer a slower speed on the low end, say 150. I do a lot of metal work also. I'm not impressed with the table.
Max
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Woodworkers Supply has the 20" for $789.99. At this point I'm thinking I want a 20".
Max
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Max wrote:

I just picked up a used Delta 17-900 and it seems very solid but I haven't had a chance to use it much. I have two DP related questions:
Is the oscillating feature good to have or is it a gimmick feature that takes away accuracy?
Why does Don Dando always start a new thread with a different subject when answering a post?
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On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 01:38:48 GMT, "Max"

Latest issue of Popular Woodworking gave the Delta line , a 17" and two 20" machines, a"Best New Tool" rating for 2006. I've neither used them nor know anything more about them, but you might want to check it.
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I'm
You did a google on "drill press" and didn't come up with much? Try again. The best way to start is to look at what is out there, make a list of what you think you want in a press, might want, don't want, etc. and then start a discussion that hopes to compare your list to the experiences of others.
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-Mike-
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"Mike Marlow" wrote

Yep, that's what I'm doing. So far, so good. I've read some good info and I thank those who have offered it. I like the Grizzly G0521 that Joe "Autodrill" suggested but it has a 3 phase motor and I'd rather not get into phase converters & such. Sears has a "fairly new" 20" DP that looks interesting. I can get a Delta 20" from Southern tool for $699. not a bad price. Getting it narrowed down.
Max
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I
phase
How about this - what do you want the drill press for? What types of work? How much use will it ever see? How did your old one serve your needs before it gave up the ghost? Do you need more than what it was, or do you simply need to replace it.
It does not do much good to say "I think I want as much capability as I can get for a reasonable price", or like statements. Of course, we all want that, but it's a meaningless qualifier. "I want the best quality I can get at a reasonable price" is equally meaningless. The lowest quality and the least functional may be all that you will ever need and would therefore make spending any extra money foolish. What most people will be able to offer when you don't qualify your needs, is their own experiences and preferences. Though that may be helpful to some degree, it is more likely to result in suggestions that are all over the map, and in some cases not even relevant to the average hobby shop operation.
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"Mike Marlow" wrote

I do hobby work and, on occasion, some work for friends (who feel the quality is good enough to pay for). I use a drill press primarily for metal work but my time in the shop is spent about 50-50 on wood and metal. I have a dedicated mortiser so I wouldn't use the DP for that. I *do* occasionally spend money foolishly. I don't play golf, drink excessively, fish, hunt, or chase women. My wife and I travel in an RV about 4-5 months out of a year. When I purchase tools, it's with my wife's agreement but with money from a 401K that I built up in a business after retirement from a government job. So I get the pension, the 401K and a piddling SS check. My wife gets her money from her 401K and a piddling SS check. When I buy tools, I look at how much the tool will be worth *to me*. The object of posting as I did is to get a variety of opinions from a variety of users because I do a variety of things, within it's capability, with a DP. Any recommendations?
Max
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about
Well Max - I'll take a stab. You really didn't give me anything to go one with what you wrote above so the best I can do is to tell you about my experience. I have a Sears press that I picked up cheap. It's probably a middle of the line drill press overall. It's a 17", 16 speed (I think), 1 1/2 HP, floor model press.
I do light metal fabrication (typically 3/8" and under thickness steel), and woodworking on it. It has served my needs very well. For this type of work, any other capabilities would be lost on me unless that capability was a shapely brunette to operate the press in the nude. I've tried to get the shapely brunette to operate my drill press in the nude but she tells me that wives don't do those things.
I find that I almost never change the speed on the press. I keep mine set slow enough for steel and it works just fine for wood boring. So, from that standpoint, even the capability that I have is lost on me. I do think the floor model has served me well over what a table top model would have served. I have lowered my table to accomodate large pieces many, many times. I've used that capability enough to say that a table top would have not filled the bill for my needs. The press drills straight and predictably, and it holds bits when I tighten down the chuck. Can't ask for more than that. It has a good work light mounted in the head and I use that every time I use the press.
If I could ask for improvements on the press it would be for quick locks on the table. To lower or raise my table, I have to "unscrew" a clamp that holds the table on the riser column. Not a real big deal, but a quarter turn cam lock would sure be nicer. As well, to tilt my table I have to grab a wratchet wrench and and extension and a socket to loosen the nut under the table. It's a real nuisance. There is not a lot of room around the nut and it's just a pain to have to grab tools to make this adjustment. A quarter turn cam lock would most certainly be better here. I don't tilt my table a lot, but I have done it enough that it annoys me every time I do it. But... I'd have to think twice before I was willing to spend an additional $100 for this feature.
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"Mike Marlow" wrote

I appreciate your response. It seems that you might have the same model DP that I have; model #113.213872. I would make the same criticisms that you've made. It has been a good performer but I'm ready for a new one. I will probably spring for a 20" model, either Delta, Craftsman, or Jet. Thanks for your input.
Max
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