Dremel Tool Questions

Page 1 of 3  
I have been a woodworker for about 20 years and have never used a Dremel tool. I plan to purchase one, but cannot decide between the more full featured tools such as the 400-6/90 Variable Speed XPR (corded) or the Dremel 8000-02 10.8V Variable Speed (cordless). It is always nice to carry the tool anywhere and not worry about a cord. Anyone have comments or suggestions--even about a different model or brand? They are both about $120 from Amazon.com if you include a spare battery with the cordless model.
Thanks for your help.
Bill
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You are a caveman. There are m/c accessories that I think are needed and come in some units' kits: a flex shaft, a 90-degree right angle attachment, an possibly a mini saw (yup a 1-3/4" skil saw!). Then there are things that would be really good: a bench stand, contour and detail sanding attachments, tile and grout attachment?, etc. I pick a "dremel" first anytime I need a small drill bit (incl. pilot holes), there are 3 std. collet sizes, with matching drill bits. You will also want an accessory kit for renewable, I have had five. For me, I want grinding cut-off wheels. The large(r), thick(er), fiber -reinforced are much better, lasting much longer. Breezes through screws. So many uses, not to mention an indispensable tool. Sanding is a blast, goes right through a 2x4" with the wheels.
This is an easy link to just read some accessories, they're always on sale, and the whole set is only 1x or 2x what one accessory costs.
http://www.canadiantire.ca/browse/subcategory_landing.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id 08474396672871&PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id„5524443285494&bmUID86162342616

-
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Ray wrote:

I hardly ever use mine anymore. I used to use it for coping, with a round rasp bit. For that use the cordless version wouldn't run very long. I picked up a Collins Coping Foot a while back, which made te Moto-Tool obsolete.
My cutoff and hand grinding tasks are done with an 18v angle grinder, with most small cuts just as easily done with a decent Hacksaw and file. I've never found the Dremel all that useful for sanding, drilling, or routing, as I have better tools for those tasks.
Wanna' buy mine?
I can take some pictures, and you can make an offer. <G>
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think I'll pass, but thanks for the info and the offer.
wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Ray wrote:

Even though you don't want mine, I'd suggest getting a good trial on the cordless before buying if you think you'll use it a lot. I can't imagine Dremel has the same quality of battery as a modern DeWalt, Makita, etc..., based on the price of the tool.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
B A R R Y wrote:

Actually Dremel was one of the first manufacturers to use a lithium ion battery in a cordless tool--it has plenty of power and lasts a good long time.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 3 Aug 2007 21:39:48 -0400, "J. Clarke"

I hadn't heard about the LiON model, but I still wonder how they do it so cheap. I see the Dremel 8000-02 going for ~ $75, in a full kit.
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
B A R R Y wrote:

Relatively small battery most likely. But then Dremels are like razors, give away the razor, make your money on the blades. Kodak used to do the same thing with cameras.
They charge about 35 bucks for the battery.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the corded varible speed. I made a federal card table FWW 12-05 and used dremel to make the 6 routes per leg to add string inlay. For the straight routes I attached a base with edge guide I purchase from Stewart McDonald ( the guitar making supplier) This came with a small blower to remove sawdust, which doubled the price and could be done without. http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Tools/Dremel_rotary_tools,_attachments/Precision_Router_Base.html The curved part was done same tool without the edge guide. No experience with cordless but cant imagine why I would use it since I have a cordless drill. A cordless drill is very expensive to replace batteries ask about Dremel battery
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Dremel tool does not become obsolete like many other brands. I bought a corded model in the Spring of 1981 for a specific task. I still have it use it occasionally. For Christmas my son bought me a Dremel accessory kit that includes a circle cutting jig that threads on to the Dremel. I had no idea that the end of my 26 year old Dremel would screw off so that the tool would perfectly fit on to the circle cutting attachment. 26 years later new Dremel attachments fit the old tools. I would say to go with the corded model as the battery will certainly expire sooner than later.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

I have one of each. Don't bother with the battery powered one - the battery dies in a few minutes, and the thing suffers from a lack of power. I never use the cordless one any more.
--Steve
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve wrote:

Is that the 10.8v lithium ion version or the older 4.8v?
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
10.8v
On Fri, 3 Aug 2007 21:40:53 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Ray wrote:

I have the corded version, my buddy has the cordless. Cordless is nice of course, but the corded one has a lot more power. Plus, you don't have to worry about charging the battery, or the battery deteriorating. Buy the corded one. If you like it, you can always get the cordless later.
Get one of those big accessory kits. They're cheap, and really helps with the principle "a solution looking for a problem". Harbor Freight has them all the time.
A Dremel is quite versatile. I don't use mine all that often, but when I need it, I'm glad I have it. Sharpening, cutting, sanding, shaping, I have tools that can do all that, but ever try to deepen a 2"x1/2" mortise with a router? Vertically? A chisel works, but why use hand tools when you can use a power tool?
HTH.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a Foredom "Bench Lathe" - a 1/6 HP mounted variable speed motor with twin shafts (think mini-grinder) with a flexshaft. I got it 20 years ago, and I was using it today to buff some delicate 1/2" ebony pieces.
If you carve, or work with small pieces, it's very handy. Foredom doesn't advertise much, but they have a great reputation.
The PDF catalog is available here
http://www.blackstoneind.com/foundations/store/documentwarehouse/documents/301Catalog_AllPages_May2006.PDF
(it's a lousy PDF file. I don't think Foredom is web savvy). But before you buy Dremel, check out other products on the same genre.
Foredom is popular with jewelers. Check out the variety of handpieces. I think they have more that 20. There's 3 different drill presses. I also see a milling and table saw attachment. Or they have the pieces where you can make your own.
I haven't checked out the Foredom catalog is a while. Some cool stuff.
How much horse power is the Dremel?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If it's a tool you haven't needed in 20 years why is it so important to now prcure said tool in a format that will enable you to carry it with you wherever, whenever?
ROY!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Ray wrote:

I have the cordless version. The battery takes forbleepingever to charge up, and 60 seconds to charge down. I bought a Harbor Fright corded version and that is going strong.     grumble     jo4hn
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can't recall the last time I used mine with wood, but I use it with metal all the time. The reinforced cutoff wheels are great for cutting and shaping small metal parts. Maybe if you want to make custom brass hardware?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Similar situation here. I don't use my Dremel on wood very often, but I have been using it a lot to fabricate the profiles for the metal blades I use in a scratch stock.
--

If you want to reply via email, change the obvious words to numbers and
remove ".invalid".
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Ray wrote:

G'day Bill, I have a GMC dremel knock off, corded, and although I don't use it often when I do it's indispensable. I'd also agree with the fellows who recommended against the cordless version. A mate gave me one a number of years ago and it's a pain in the proverbial. Whenever you need it the battery's always flat, and once charged it never lasts long. Id also go with the kits, they make the machine into a real problem solver. regards John
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.