Dovetail Jig Questionj

Hi all:
The response to my question last evening indicates that this is the place to begin.
I am considering the purchase of a Dovetail Joint Jig. I already own a set of Dovetail Bits with a 1/2 in shank. Every Jig I have seen this far comes with a 1/4 in shank dovetail bit and a 1/2 in template adapter. Is it worth my while to look for a Jig which I can use my 1/2 in shank bits in? Or will it be an Industrial size one which is far larger than I need? Or should I throw in the towel and accept the I can't use the bits I have and get a jig with the smaller bit? I am just getting into this so this may seem like a REALLY elementary question. I apologize in advance.
Richard Shelson
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No need to apologize. It's REC.woodworking.
So, Richard, what do you want to build? How many DT's do you want to cut? Through, half-blind, or some of the more specialized ones? Do you already own a good router, or is it one of the weekend warrior, less than US$100 kind from the local home center?
Buying a dovetail jig to match a set of bits you have seems a little like choosing a truck, because you were given a set of snow tires by a family member. You MAY not end up with what you really needed or wanted, in order to save really very few bucks.
Dovetail jigs run from cheap/useful/limited function to expensive/versatile/industrial quality. A Google search of the rec.woodworking archives will reveal many good, but personal, insights. You'll also find quite a few folks who believe that cutting them by hand builds character, craftsmanship and points with discriminating observers. That may be true, but if you're trying to build a kitchen full of drawers in your spare time after work, a jig looks mighty helpful.
Patriarch
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I use 1/2" shank bits with my Porter Cable 12" dovetail jig. It works just fine.

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Richard, Most dovetail jugs use 1/4" or 8MM shank sizes to accomodate the space between the fingers of the jig. In addition to the bit, a guide collar is also needed, preventing the use of the larger-diameter bit shanks. I do not recall ever seeing a dovetail jig that would use the 1/2"-shanked bits.
Tom Hintz www.newwoodworker.com
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Tom Hintz wrote:

http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/cnc_joinery.html (-:
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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I own two Porter Cable jigs...
The "cheap version" and the Omnijig(the very heavy duty version) and they both use either the 1/2" or 1/4" dovetail bit with no problem. The same guide collar is ALWAYS used in dovetail jigs regardless of bit size.
Tom Hintz wrote:

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Take a look at the Porter Cable 12".

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snipped-for-privacy@newwoodworker.com (Tom Hintz) wrote in message

The leigh d4 will work with 1/4", 8mm, and 1/2" bits. You use a 5/8" collar for the half inch. The only advantage I can see to the 1/4" bits would be narrower pins.
brian
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