Do I need a table saw?

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I have an old heavy Sears tablesaw. Besides, I have a hand circular saw, jigsaw, reciprocating saw, and a radial saw. The tablesaw takes space in my garage and I have not used it in a while. I do not make fancy things like furniture etc. Just crude stuff for my projects that is of secondary nature (like an enclosure for a phase converter or a doghouse for a generator).
So, what I am getting at is, are there any real life needs for a tablesaw given that I have other saws. I suspect that the answer is no. If so, perhaps I can sell the tablesaw and free up some space.
Any thoughts? Do I need a tablesaw?
i
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NO, the RAS wil do all that more safely. Wilson

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Ignoramus21895 (in ezOJe.1$ snipped-for-privacy@fe67.usenetserver.com) said:
| Any thoughts? Do I need a tablesaw?
If you don't use it, then it doesn't do you any good to keep it. In my case, I'd give up almost any other saw in my shop before I gave up my table saw.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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That's the exact reverse for me where I use the table saw almost everyday but hardly touch my radial arm saw. All that is I know is the tool that I get rid off today or misplaced is the tool that I will need to buy tomorrow - so I'm keeping everything and let the wife bitch until I built the storage/shop in the backyard.
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I am afraid that I mis-named one of my tools. I do not have a radial arm saw. What I have is a tilting saw like a cutoff saw, that can do miters of various kinds. Good for cutting boards at angles.

I already have storage in my backyard... And my wife has been patient, but her patience will run out one day!
i
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That's a miter saw. Most are 10" or 12" blades.

Keep the saw trade the wife. Next year my wife will be 60 and I'll trade her for two 30's.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Okay, yes, that's the name. Thanks.

I do not need to trade my wife to get more people, she can make new people by herself, with a bit of help from me.
i
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Since you don't have a RAS you may just want to keep the TS.
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I worked for a company (29 years) that sold both. Table saws out sold radial arm saws to a point it wasn't even a race. The radial arm saws did beat out the table saws in one area though, they beat the table saws back to the service department for repairs, probably by a 100 to 1 ratio. RM~
PS, In all fairness, I will say that this was in the days before very many direct drive table saws were sold. They probably evened up the score a tad.
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I have access to both and use both.
TS excells for ripping, RAS for crosscutting, especially for repeating complicated cuts.
If you have both, you'll use both.
If you have one or the other, you'll be prefectly happy, and doubtless become a partisan for your prefered machine.
A RAS needs space along a wall, versus a TS needing space all around, which is probably more important a consideration than any other for most people.
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My first large saw was a RAS. I used it for about 6 years amd built most of the furniture in my house with it. Then I added a TS and never used the RAS again. About 8 years later I added a CMS and used it untill I up graded to a cabinet saw. I use the cabinet saw for everything now and seldom use the CMS. More than anything I think the quality of the saw determines how much you are going to use it. I have absolutely no problem making repeated exact length cross cuts, miters, and compound miters hundreds of times with the TS and a proper jig set up or sled.
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wrote:

silly me assuming equal quality. The RASes I've used are old, solid Craftman units from the '60s. The TS is similar vintage.
I've not seen any current production RAS that I'd buy apart from the Delta 12" model the Borgs have for cutting millwork to size.
That model looks comparable to current Unisaw/Powermatic offerings, for a price point in the same ballpark.
It's always been evident to me that building a usuable TS is a much simpler matter than building a usuable RAS. The lack of the RAS equivalent to a Grizzley contractor saw would seem to indicate that manufacturers agree--though I've never seen DeWalt's (irrc) offering up close.
I don't find ripping comfortable on an RAS, but my wife's uncle has only a RAS and a miniscule shop and thinks I'm foolish for wanting a CS rather than an RAS.
At a similar price point, the machines are more or less interchangable and it comes down to preference.
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My table saw is an old Craftsman model with cast iron body and two big wings.
i
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On Tue, 09 Aug 2005 17:10:04 GMT, Ignoramus6689

The TS is an early '60's Craftsman with a cast iron top and a shop-made roller stand. About the size/weight/motor of a modern contractor saw, but only a 9" blade. The fence is fussy, but it stays in place once you set it up. An outfeed table and you're in business.
Both RASes are late '60's vintage 10" models, and hold their adjustment for literal YEARS, my usual victim in hobbyest use for my Dad and me, SWMBO's uncle in moderate commercial use.
I'm still buying the 5HP Powermatic with my lottery winnings.
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Yeah, I hated ripping on a RAS also. I was not fond of ripping 2' and shorter pieces on a RAS.
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I keep my tablesaw, turned sideways, on top of my homemade rotary phase converter. It does not take as much space as it used to, because it is stored more effectively now.
i
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Excuse my ignorance, but what in tar nation is a "rotary phase converter" ?

everyday
I
built
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It is a device that produces 3 phase power from single phase power. A rotary phase converter can be made in several different ways, but they always include a large 3 phase motor that is called an "idler". That idler, as it spins in the magnetic field generated by the single phase leg, produces phase shifted power in the third leg.
The challenge is to make the idler spin up. Once it starts spinning, it can continue to run on single phase power.
My phase converter has a 10 HP idler motor, and start capacitors that are used for starting (and are never switched off sincethey are continuous duty).
Its pictures and the story can be seen at
http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Phase-Converter /
My rotary phase converter cost me $45 to make. A similar new RPC would cost approximately $600 plus shipping.
i

--


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On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 19:40:58 GMT, Ignoramus21895

No, but it's usually a lot nicer than using the circular saw, especially for ripping. If you've got one, it's worth hanging onto- sure as anything, you'll need it the day after it leaves your garage.
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If you need to ask, then you don't. Jim

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