Delta jointer motor repair (and story)

Has anyone here had success getting a Delta motor repaired? I'm just curious about the approximate cost, a new one from Delta is $263.64 + $8 shipping.
This is for a used Delta 37-190 6" jointer that I brought home today for $180. A decent deal, right?
I tested it on some pine in the guy's driveway, it ran for several minutes and handled a number of passes on a 2x4. He had upgraded to a used 8" and had a pretty good shop going with plenty of examples of his craftsmanship in his house. I could tell he was upgrading to second generation tools, about where I'd like to be in 3-5 years. So although I knew the unit was used, it seemed to be properly cared for. Everything was flat and rust-free and there were no signs of neglect or abuse.
We took it mostly apart so I could fit it in my car. I got it home and put back together, re-setting all the blades to within 0.002", and adjusting the tables and the fence stops to dead on. (This all took about 2 hours, but I was pleased with how accurate I got the knives.)
Then I turned it on and off a few times, just to make sure the knives were set and balanced. I smelled something hot, and I figured the belt was re-setting. But the fourth time I tried the power switch, nothing happened. It looks like the motor is dead. (Although I still have some reading to do tonight to see learn how to diagnose it with a multimeter.)
This seems to be a case of just getting what you pay for when you buy used, it's always a risk after the warranty period is gone. Any suggestions on how I can still keep this sweet deal from going sour?
--
Steve Hall [ digitect dancingpaper com ]

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This doesn't sound too promising... Assuming that the motor is a capacitor start, capacitor run motor, the either the run capacitor has self destructed or the field coil has a short. If it is a capacitor start, induction run motor, then the field coil likely has a short.
What I would do is to take it to an electrical motor shop and get them to evaluate the motor. It might be easy to spend more money repairing the motor than a new one would cost.
Jim
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On Sat, 27 Jan 2007 23:40:17 GMT, Steve Hall

I agree with Jim. Take it to a motor repair shop and have them estimate the repair. They may want to charge you to look at it so ask first. Our local guy will apply the diagnosis cost to the repair or to the cost of a new motor if needed. Also, I wouldn't be too concerned about buying the motor from Delta. You can probably get a better price locally or online.
Mike O.
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Before doing that, be sure the wood chips did not get into it during the move. (if it is an open motor)
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Sure it's not the switch or the thermal overload tripped on the motor? Fast way to kill a motor is turning it on and off many times in fast successions.
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On Sat, 27 Jan 2007 23:40:17 +0000, Steve Hall wrote:

Just an update...I took the motor to a place to evaluate and it ran perfectly for them. Brought it home and it now works for me, although about every third time, it throws the GFI when I turn it OFF. I guess maybe the switch (not original) is going bad. But for now, I have my first jointer, super smooth and straight!
--
Steve Hall [ digitect dancingpaper com ]

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