Delta 36-426 Am I trying to cut beyond this tools capabilities?????

I have a Delta 36-426 and am trying to cut 1 1/2" hard maple.
I've tried a Freud 30 tooth combination blade. Got one cut out and was unable to make a second cut.
I've tried a Delta 24 tooth fast ripping blade. Machine locked up and no go.
HELP!
Is this just more than my saw can do or am I missing something???????
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Make the cut in two passes. Cut 1/2 way through, flip (keeping same side to fence) and finish the cut.
I have the 36-444 with a 1 1/2hp motor. Ran 8/4 mahogany with one cut using a Freud 24 tooth blade. Just went slowly. If you hear the motor change pitch, slow down.
dave

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...you guys have fun...if this is a sincere post then I'll give ya the Delta 36-426 is contractor TS 30" Unifence. Not much else makes sense on this post so I'm gonna pass on further comments.

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Maybe he mounted the blade backwards?
scott
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"ashe" wrote in message

Do you have the saw plugged into a long extension cord? Do you have a splitter installed? Are you cutting reaction wood and the kerf is closing on you and bogging the saw down?
Dave gave you good advice for starters .. make two passes. .. either flip the board as he suggests, or do two, or more, successive depth of cuts in the same kerf, referencing the same face against the fence.
Even then, that sometimes won't work on reaction wood.
If the wood is closing up on you pulling the saw down, make sure you have a splitter installed ... that is the safest way to handle the situation. If that is indeed the case, and you have no splitter, it is possible to wedge the cut past the blade ... although that is best left to someone who has done it before, as it can be a dicey operation. Obviously, you would not attempt to wedge a kerf with the saw running, and start up can be surprising. That said, reaction wood is often not worth dealing with after a cut, so you may just want to grab another piece.
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Yea, I tried sticking a wedge in the cut too close to the blade while the saw was running, won't do that again. lol dave

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This is a sincere post and ClemsonDave is correct... I am using a Delta 10" contractor ts 30" Unifence. I'm clearly not experienced which is why I've asked for help. That being said, thank you all for the advice.
I do have the blade on correctly, I'm not plugged into an extention cord, but I do not have a splitter installed. I think that was a very good idea. I will also try cutting in two passes. Slow and steady wins the race.
Again, thank you all for your words of wisdom.
P.S. I'm a she not "he" Scott. Might also explain why I'm having some trouble :)
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On 15 Apr 2004 19:41:41 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (ashe) wrote:

ah, c'mon Ashley.... don't get the bums started....
all of us were beginners when we started. gender doesn't have anything to do with mechanical aptitude. upbringing, maybe....
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (ashe) wrote in message news:

I think it's 99% certain that your troubles reside with the wood, not the saw. As a woodworker, you will find that some wood turns out to have internal stresses that cause the piece to want to close up the kerf and so bind the blade. the forces involved can be quite amazing and definitely capable of stalling a 1.5 HP table saw. This tendency is especially prevalent with thicker stock (i.e. more than 4/4/) and especially a problem with maple. It has do with the way the tree grew and/or the board was cut out of it at the mill and/or the stock was dried by the kiln and/or the species involved. Maybe you can control for some of these factors, but, bottom line, solid wood works differently from a homeogenous, predictable product like, say, MDF or plywood. Obviously, it is dangerous to have the blade saw with the power to the motor, so you must do everything possible to avoid it.
Although not its main purpose, the splitter can help to prevent binding and you should put the stock one back on the saw for ripping, or better yet, buy one of the better ones that Delta and Bies. sell. Using a rip blade helps too.
..The ideal solution is to rough rip stock that experience tells you may be problematic slightly overwidth on the bandsaw first, then go to the table saw. A bandsaw cuts differently from a circular saw and is less prone to getting bound up and much less dangerous when it does so. Of course, maybe you don't have a bandsaw yet, in which case you will need to find workarounds with the tablesaw, like those suggested.

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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (ashe) writes:

My apologies for not checking the headers first.
scott
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Ashley that only means two things: - You're smarter than most of us because you noticed the problem and stopped to ask - You're smarter than most of us, well, just because you are
Put that splitter back on, quick. Some other sincere questions: the blade nice n' sharp? blade at right height? you standing off to one side in case of kickback? got'chur safety glasses on? gotch'ur push sticks handy? keeping your fingers/hands clear?
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In my previous post I referenced ClemsonDave when I should have referenced Tom.
Didn't mean to put words in your mouth ClemsonDave.
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First try the other suggestions, such as blade binding etc., but you can also put on a smaller blade, I assume you have a 10" changing to an 8 1/4" will still let you cut to 2 1/4" but there will be less load placed on the motor.
Bernard R
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...never experienced "machine lock-up" on a belt-drive (have smelled burning rubber though) and can't believe that it would happen with 1 1/2" anywood with a good blade unless things (binding against fence, blade square to the table, etc) are so out of whack that the thermal overload on the motor took over. My first thought was electrical. Do the lights dim when you bring the saw under load? If so an earlier question was asked about extension cords...undersized will reduce the power to the motor (but will give heat in the shop if that is desirable and doesn't get to bon-fire stage). You say no so next question is are you running 12ga or 10ga wire to the machine in the first place? (IMHO 14ga wire should be outlawed but builders sometimes like it to save a few pennies per foot). Did you check the power cord connection to the switch and motor?
Maybe switching to 40 tooth carbide blade will help...I am alone here in my praise of the Oldham blades (sold at HD for around $17) for general use...rougher cut but they take a beating like no blade I've seen elsewhere and jointer clean-up at 1/32nd gives me the same results as the 60 tooth version.

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I've managed to stall a link-belt equipped Delta Contractor, when ripping salvage 2x4 stock that closed up on the blade. I'm not sure of the wood; it was 'spacer' stock for keeping the metal banding off the 'good stuff'.
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