deflection in router bits

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I would demand and expect my 1/4" drill bit to not wobble in my drill press. I realize that the RPM is higher on the router, but the principle holds true. Maybe I'm just lucky as I've not ever experienced what you reference. I still suspect that the bit is bent as it doesn't take much as you move the router around, lay it on its side, etc. I had a buddy buy some cheap router bits - total waste of time and money. I have mostly 1/4" shank carbide bits, I expect to pay $20 -- $30 per bit, I have them resharpened, some are over 20 years old and still work fine.
On 2/18/2015 7:10 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

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On 2/14/2015 6:19 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

A two bearing bit, top and bottom, is a convenience thing. It is some times easier to use one or the other depending on the orientation of the bit to the work and or pattern. Typically a straight cut bit with a bearing is a flush cut bit.

Well that is not entirely true. If you are flush cutting veneer or laminate a 1/4" flush cut bit is more than adequate. and those are typically bottom bearing bits. In thicker cuts if is best to not cut so much in a pass that you hear the chatter. At that point your bit is over loaded with what it can easily handle and does not deliver the smoothest cut.

The smaller the diameter of the cutter portion of the bit the faster you need to run. Once you start using bits that have a 1" or greater cutter you need to slow down the router speed.
A 1/2" shank bit will typically deliver less chatter however it does not prevent you from removing too much material. You can still over load a small diameter cutter on a 1/2" shank bit.
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On Mon, 16 Feb 2015 10:40:19 -0600

I've not seen a straight cut bit with a bearing at top only so the definition should be a straight cut bit with a bottom bearing and may also have a top bearing with a collar to secure it.

true doesn't have gradations
i turned the light not entirely on

a laminate 1/4-inch shank flush cut bit that doesn't deflect under no load is adequate
more adequate or more better

or once you start using bits that deflect under no load
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wrote:

They are common, handy for routing around a template that is on top of what is being cut.
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dadiOH
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On 2/16/2015 10:53 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Great cor cutting dado,s with a router and template/straight edge guide. http://www.cabinetmakerwarehouse.com/amana-tool-flush-pattern-plunge-45464?gclid=CjwKEAiAx4anBRDz6JLYjMDxoQYSJAA4loRm_4pJw-l8Xuvkz0ZQpWKG2C4HijvPaR1aGf0FVu6hQRoCu9Tw_wcB

Not always true.

Look, I am only trying to help you out. If yo want to get into a pissing contest, you win.

Then you have a defective bit or it is not properly mounted in the router.
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On Mon, 16 Feb 2015 15:31:40 -0600

now I know, just hadn't seen them as another poster pointed out too

it is, a partial truth is a full lie but I just figured your reply was meant to be polite instead saying I was full of it

Yay! wait what'd i win
settle down is rec.woodwroking

I'm leaning toward a poorly engineered bit but I still have a couple of tests to do with it
so possibly defective by design but still a chance that it's defective in materials although it appears fine
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On 2/14/2015 7:19 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

I'd just put a dial gauge on it and check for runout (powered off of course). You could have anything from true bending of the bit, a slightly dirty collet or sleeve, dodgy bearings, bad seating, or some combination. 2-1/4" for such a bit sounds more like a pattern cutting bit rather than a standard flush-trim bit but I guess that the difference is more a matter of degree. I've never seen flexing of even a 1/4"-shank router bit used at normal loading.
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On Mon, 16 Feb 2015 13:18:50 -0500

it's a 1-1/4-inch x 1/4-inch shank

I've never used any bits longer than 3/4-inch with 1/4-inch shank so first time I'd seen it
as mentioned will remove bottom bearing & allen screw just to see of there's an imbalance
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