Dado blade

I'm not a pro, hell I'm not even really a hobyist. To make a long story short, I've recently picked up a dado blade for my table saw. It's one of those rotating, expando type with two blades. I've got minor problems at the extremes of width (slightly concave/convex dados) - but I can live with that for the types of projects I'm working on.
I have one issue, however, that I can't live with. The blade width is set by rotating the two halves against each other and the width expands/contracts to whatever width you want.
Herein lies the problem. No matter how tight I crank the nut when mounting the blade, there's slippage in the two halves of the blade that cause the width to expand (it always expands and never contracts. No matter what width I set it at, or how hard I crank the nut after it's mounted, the slippage occurs. I can't keep it set on any width as very soon after it starts spinning, it starts slipping and starts to open up.
Any suggestions?
Thanks.
Jason W. Paul
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I suggest they outlaw that type of dado blade. I think you will get much better results from a stacked set, even a cheap one. Ed
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Clarification for a newbie...
Would the blade on this link be a stached dado that you speak of?
http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=productDetail&productId3863-000061089-SD2 08
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http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=productDetail&productId3863-000061089-SD2
Yep, that's is a "stacked" dado set.
Simply a _set_ of saw blades, usually 6" or 8" in diameter, consisting of two outside blades that look like your typical table saw blade; a number of varying thickness "chippers", with two or more teeth, that are mounted between the two outside blades on the table saw's arbor; and a set of "shims", plastic or metal, that are mounted between the blades and chippers to adjust the "stack" for a desired width of cut.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/13/04
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Hi Jason,
I have been a amateur woodworker (for want of a better term) for almost 15 years now. I bought my first dado like yours about 10 years ago (Sears Excalibur) for about $75. It is not perfect and requires numerous adjustments to get a decent fit. However, I have used it on everything from pressure treated 2 x 12 for garden/deck to fine Pennsylvania cherry for a raised panel blanket chest for my wife's 50th. Sure, I had to chisel some flat bottoms etc, but it has served well for these years.
I must have arrived at another level of woodworking or something, because I tired of all the minor inconvenience and bought a Freud SD508 for about $160 (Amazon) - just last week - has not arrived yet.
If I was sure that I would progress with woodworking, I could have saved myself $85 and some grief over the years.
On the other hand, now have the Sears for "rough" projects & the Freud for fine furniture.
Just my 2.
Lou
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Ummmmm..........yard art?
Go get a good stacked dado set. There is no compromise here. The money will be well spent and savings in not messing up good wood will be worth it.
Jason Paul wrote:

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Chect out www.harborfreight.com We have a store here in Raleigh and you can get internet priced from the store with a copy of the page. I bought one (from the internet, it was not available in the store) on sale for around $29 it is an 8" stacked carbide tipped. I haven't used it yet, but it looks pretty good. Frank
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As has been extensively reported here, you take your chances with HF dado blades. For the exact same stock number, some are pretty good and some stink. I lucked out and got a good one, but there's a lot who have gotten $20-60 worth of Chinese junk.
I've come to the conclusion that made in Chinese isn't necessarily going to mean it's junk. It just that the chances of it being junk are better than average. They seem to have a pretty crappy quality control system.
I'm guessing that the better quality suppliers pick and choose the bettter stuff and dump the poorer quality stuff down hill.
On Sun, 02 May 2004 10:06:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@bellsouthNOSPAM.net wrote:

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