Cutting Thick With Small Tools

Can I get recommendations on the best way to cut 1/8 to 1/4 inche thick slices off of materials like wood and soft metal that are up to 4 inches in diameter?
I'm thinking of getting the smallest bandsaw that would accomodate these sizes,but I don't know much about how accurately I can do this.
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Can I get recommendations on the best way to cut 1/8 to 1/4 inche thick slices off of materials like wood and soft metal that are up to 4 inches in diameter?
I'm thinking of getting the smallest bandsaw that would accomodate these sizes, but I don't know much about how accurately I can do this.
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

Are you talking about cutting thin "cookies" off the ends of round stock? If so, I'd do it with a miter saw.
But if you're talking about ripping thin strips off lengthways, then I'd use a bandsaw. However, I don't think a small (benchtop) bandsaw will give you satisfactory service if your primary purpose is to cut 4" thick stock. You may manage to make the cut, but the narrow blades those saws use will be wandering all over the place. I think you'll need a standard 14" model to be successful.
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Are you going to hire an apprentice to go and find them as they fly all over the shop? <G>
A jig can be made where the "keeper" end is inserted into a block, then pulled or tapped out after it's cut. The jig will work on miter and table saws.
Personally, I'd do it with a decent, well-tuned 14" band saw with a zero clearance insert.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote in

For round stock, a lathe and a cut-off tool.
--
Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Anthony wrote:

I'd recommend a horizontal band saw or power hacksaw (with appropriate blade [1])
[1] Power hacksaw blades for cutting wood can be made using 1" band saw blades cut to length and punched for mounting holes
--
BigEgg
Hack to size. Hammer to fit. Weld to join. Grind to shape. Paint to cover.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'd second the horizontal bandsaw idea. IIRC, the Jet one is fairly inexpensive, and it'll do that particular job really well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree. Horiz bandsaw is the only way to fly in this case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

You best bet is probably to buy them already cut. Many materials suppliers will cut them for you - of course you will pay for the service. And I'm saying that as someone who spent thousands on tools to do a bad job of work that would have cost me hundreds to have done...
Another option would be to buy flat stock of your intended thickness and then cut it into circles on a vertical bandsaw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 05 Nov 2006 05:06:17 -0800, Searcher7 wrote:

The term "soft metal" is pretty vague. Are you contemplating brass, copper, aluminum, low-carbon steels?
Whatever metal is involved in this arrangement will determine your minimum bandsaw equirements. And yes, the other posters are correct ...if you are going to cut any appreciable quantity of this material you definitely want a horizontal bandsaw with recirculating coolant. The coolant also acts as a lubricant, reducing the load on the blade, bearings and motor and extending the life of the unit as a whole while increasing the speed of the actual cut. For cutting thick metals, you need a STOUT blade and high blade tensions on a VERY rigid saw or you are just going to make nested saucers, not disks.
DoAll makes nice saws ... but they are industrial in nature, built like a tank and priced like one, too.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks everyone.
I can see that I'm going to have to worry about cutting metals with a bandsaw another time. I'll obviously have to outsource that work. Recirculating coolant is definitely not an option. And I need something with the smallest possible foot print anyway.
The immediate project will involve cutting 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick "plates" off of Delrin cylinders that are 4 inches in diameter, so I was hoping that perhaps I could get away with a 4 X 6.
Any specific recommendations?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York. ********************************************************************************************************** Bill wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A 4x6 bandsaw will cut that just fine. Use a coarse blade -- 10-12tpi.
With any such "first cut" material, you'll have to true up these disks on the lathe or mill afterwards.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Some that take the time to tune the blade angle are reporting very accurate sectional dimensions from consecutive slices of such material.
I have seen people report .001" over a 2" round
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rex B wrote:

I'm still in the learning process concerning how to tune my mini-lathe(and mini-mill), but I guess tuning the blace angle on a bandsaw is much easier.
Though, that kind of accuracy is not a necessity. I would want dimensional consistency determined by the human eye.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Searcher7 wrote:

I can't seem to find a 4 X 6 at Harbor Frieght.
I do have an opportunity to get a used 12" 1.1/8 HP Craftsman 2-Speed Band Saw for $100.
Any reasons to stay away from this?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Searcher7 wrote: ...

...
'12"' sounds like a vertical woodcutting bandsaw. If so, the blade speed is WAY too fast for metal.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.