Cutting firewood with a table saw

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Many years ago I made some small logs into lumber using a RAS, chain saw, rotary planer on the RAS and even a bit of hand sawing and planing. Unless you really love terrorizing yourself I suggest you find someone with a bandsaw or buy one (always nice to add iron to the shop) or else get out a decent ripsaw and have at it. Trust me, doing it with the wrong tools is just *way* to exciting!
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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I agree with the idea that the bandsaw's "the" tool for the job but if he makes a sled for the table saw and secures the pieces of "firewood" to the sled, I think he's going to be safe enough. Free hand would be a whole 'nother matter.
rhg
Tim Douglass wrote:

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On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 17:46:02 -0500, Robert Galloway

It depends a bit on the size of the blocks. If they are small enough that you can get through them with a cut from each side on the TS you may be OK, but fully buried cuts are particularly dangerous in full rounds because of the tensions in the wood. I'll just leave at the statement that *I* wouldn't do it.
Tim Douglass
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On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 16:17:00 -0700, Tim Douglass wrote:

I appreciate the excellent advice, and I'm certain that you're right. Probably that advice is the most sensible, but you may underestimate the terror I experience at the thought of sharp things spinning at horrifying speeds next to my skinny little fingers. It's been a couple of years and i still haven't done anything with the pieces. I mean, I've still got ten fingers and I'm pretty enthusiastic about keeping them.
Unfortunately, a band saw isn't in the cards at the moment, because I need a big strong one for resawing purposes and I can't afford it, unless some widow or orphan puts one up for sale cheap and I beat the rest of the vultures to the prize. I'm just not the vulture I once was, alas.
So, bearing in mind that I won't hold any well-meaning advisors liable for any digital destruction, how 'bout this idea: Somewhere I have a jig I built for a router, made to level a slab of maple 1X2s I put together for a counter top. Router slides back and forth on a track, leveling the surface below-- similar jigs have appeared in every router book ever published, I imagine. These chunks, BTW, are split into quarters, some of them into eigths, so they alread have one or two more or less flat sides. Assuming my router jig can safely flatten one side of a carefully blocked-up chunk, the table saw should then be able to cut another side perpedicular, flat side down on a sliding table. And after two flat sides, cake. Right? None of the chunks are more than three or four inches thick and no more than a foot and a half long.
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That will certainly work, though it's a lot of work. Given your fear of your table saw, maybe you should go that route though. If these are already split, aren't the split faces flat enough to slide across your table saw steadily? Unless your wood is really twisted it would seem (admittedly a guess, since I cannot see the wood), that you are making more of this than you need to.
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On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 15:20:27 +0000, Mike Marlow wrote:

Maybe you're right. The faces aren't really very flat; they rock back and forth quite a bit on the table, but maybe I should just give it a shot. I could hot-glue a shim under the high corner to stabilize the piece. I don't have a planer either, and in the past I've put a decent face on rough lumber using the router jig. It's quite a bit faster and (with my limited skills) flatter than hand planing or beltsanding.
I think that anyone who isn't scared of the table saw is severely lacking in imagination, since it's the tool that causes the most accidents. In a way I envy more phlegmatic folks, but I guess I'm more attached to my fingers than I am to my peace of mind. Ideally, I suppose, a smart person would take all reasonable precautions, pay attention, and not worry unduly. If at all possible, I try to devise a foolproof way of making tricky cuts, so as not to rely at all on luck. I've probably got more featherboards and pushsticks than anyone really needs. Hey, I drive like a little old lady too.
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Fri, Aug 6, 2004, 5:42pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (ray) says: <snip> I think that anyone who isn't scared of the table saw is severely lacking in imagination, since it's the tool that causes the most accidents. In a way I envy more phlegmatic folks, but I guess I'm more attached to my fingers than I am to my peace of mind. Ideally, I suppose, a smart person would take all reasonable precautions, pay attention, and not worry unduly. If at all possible, I try to devise a foolproof way of making tricky cuts, so as not to rely at all on luck.
That pretty much describes my feeling on it.
I've probably got more featherboards and pushsticks than anyone really needs.
I don't have any featherboards, and I usually have to make a new pushstick, any time I need one. Seeing as I make them out of leftover chunks of plywood, and it takes about 30 seconds to make one, no biggie.
Hey, I drive like a little old lady too.
That's scary.
JOAT Jesus was a Ford man, that's why he walked everywhere.
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flatten the faces before you get near the table saw. if the router jig works for you, use it. planes are lotsa fun to use though. consider getting one....
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Robert Galloway wrote:

How about using a froe and then planing them flatter. Dave in Fairfax
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Nothing wrong with that idea at all. I thought he was looking for a "power" approach to the problem. I usually have more toys than time and use hand tools when I think the experience is a whole lot better (reduced noise and dust) or I think the end result is a whole lot better (scraper versus belt sander). Otherwise, for me it's the power tool route every time.
rhg
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I agree. Saw mills used to use circular saws. Nothing but a big tablesaw.

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wrote:

There *are* a few differences between a sawmill and a tablesaw besides size. Probably the two biggest factors are the total size of the piece (Very big for the sawmill, too massive to kick easily) and the diameter of the blade vs the size of the piece. If you look at a lot of old sawmill pics you will see saws that are 7-8 feet in diameter cutting 2 foot logs. The point where the blade is in contact with the tree is traveling almost vertically with relatively little angular motion to generate kickback. The saws also have a rather wide set to prevent binding.
Tim Douglass
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Tim Douglass responds:

Ayup. And the dogs on the carriage do a pretty fair country job of holding the log in place, anyway. Too, there is NO ONE anywhere near a kickback area should one occur. The operator is off to one side--in a steel and plastic cage in modern versions, with an array of controls in front of him.
Charlie Self "Inanimate objects are classified scientifically into three major categories - those that don't work, those that break down and those that get lost." Russell Baker
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What? are you saying that you are to stupid to fixture something so it won't kill you?

a
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wrote:

If you see it that way, yes.
Tim Douglass
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Good excuse to buy a band saw? Make friends with someone with a bandsaw. Really the best way to go. If you just want to make a few pieces of veneer, your suggestion of a sled sounds as good as any but the bandsaw's the device that was created with this kind of thing in mind. rhg
ray wrote:

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take it to a sawmill
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