crown molding

I'm attempting to install crown molding in several rooms. The first room went fine. Now in the bathroom and master bedroom there are some ceiling areas that are lower than others (lets say dips). This is preventing the two ends of the board from matching up with the adjacent pieces of molding.
Does anyone have any suggestions on how to rectify this problem? Thought about digging the ceiling drywall out where it's low (I suspect the finish product would'nt look very good). Also thought about filing down the molding to match the undesirable contour of the ceiling; this would probably be fairly time consuming.
Thanks for any incite...
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Someone suggested that you could lay a bead of caulk on the top of the molding before installing it. I haven't tried it yet, but it might work if the gap is not to big.
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Lew wrote...

SNIP
Would something like this help?
http://www.ferche.com/page17.htm
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Jake Jarvis
http://www.justwoodworking.com
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You don't say how low the ceiling dips, but I would presume that the best way to install the molding would be to establish the lowest part of the worst dip, and install the molding to that height. Obviously the top of the molding won't be touching the ceiling in many places, so you'd need to cut an install an appropriately angled backer board all around the room on which to nail the molding.
Then you're faced with the problem of the gap around the top - you could caulk this if it's not too bad, or maybe you could use something like "Great Stuff" if the gap is fairly large. That would require sanding or sculpting to shape afterwards..........
If the ceiling dips are more than a couple of eighths worst case, you could be left with something that looks just plain bad.

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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (Lew) wrote in message

Find out what the installed profile is of your molding, the measurement of the bottom of the crown molding to the top when oriented properly for installation. Let's say 4" from bottom to ceiling. This is easily measured on your miter saw table by laying the molding face up, and using the fence as the ceiling. With the molding raised up in the fence to mimic the ceiling install, measure from the fence to the front of the molding, which would be the bottom of the molding on the wall.
Figure out how bad the dip is in the ceiling. Let's say 3/8". Take the profile height of your molding of 4", and add the 3/8" dip to it to have a measurement of 4 3/8". Measure this amount down on the corners of the room on the affected wall, pop a line on the wall using these reference marks, and installed the crown molding to the line. (Make sure you have marked the studs as you must shoot into the studs doing this). Install the molding and caulk the crack with elastomeric caulk like "Big Stretch". Good elastomeric caulk (NOT NOT NOT painter's caulk at .99 a tube will act as a good adhesive.
A good tip: When I have the molding in place, I use a screwdriver to hold out the molding on the top joint to the correct position and shoot the molding to a joists where I can, definitely where it touched the sag. Although you can see the shaft of the trim nail for me a 2 1/2" 15 ga.) where it is away from the ceiling, it will be covered up when you caulk the space closed.
If it is only a couple of joists that are sagging, and not too much, depending on the size of the crown molding I will do a combination of cutting into the sheetrock ceiling and moving the crown down. You need pretty big crown to do that, so none of that 2 1/2" stuff if you are splitting the difference by doing both. With big crown, say the 5" stuff, you can hide 1/2" pretty easy with some patience.
Remember, you will hardly notice the top profile of the crown. But YOU WILL notice the bottom edge of the trim no matter what because you will be looking right at it with a light shining in such a way as to highlight it going up and down on the wall.
Robert
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Robert....great post....thanks for the detailed instructions. I've read your info about four times and I'm ready to go to work....Thanks again.....Lew
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Robert L. Witte) wrote in message

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First try and get the lengths of molding the same as the wall length. If this is not possible then make the joint at a stud . If neither is possible make the joint on the bench and glue a backer plate to the back of the crown [essentially making the crown the wall length]. A backer plate all around the room as has been suggested is another solution.
So long as the lower edge is continuous is the main concern gaps between the molding and the crown generally are not noticable unless they are excessive ...mjh
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"Lew" < snipped-for-privacy@cox.net> wrote in message
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Thanks for all who replied. Never thought about finding the lowest dip in the room then installing the bottom off all molding on this line (what do they say, think out of the box).
Looks like I can proceed this weekend with some confidece.....Again, thank you.
Lew
snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (Lew) wrote in message

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