CPOworkshop.com Experience

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A threaded insert has wood threads on the outside and machine threads on the inside. A T-nut will have some sort of flange, and often have spikes to keep it from turning. The T-nut spikes can't be trusted to keep the bolt from falling out if the piece is lifted, while the threaded insert can.
If you'd like pictures, just type in "T-nut" and "threaded insert" in Google.
The nut/washer washer/nut system also works well if you can go through the piece. The threaded inserts and T-nuts work well for things like legs where going through the piece is impractical.
*snip*

Hope this helps,
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

Yes, very helpful! Thanks!
Bill
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Look up blind nut. They would allow you to use machine bolts. If lag, cut the end off square to protect the concrete. Lag bolts through 1 1/2" pine would last 20 years, no problem with strength if you pre drill the hole so the wood does not spit. Use 1/2" bolt.
--
Jim in NC

That should do it.
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Two different parts that are both there at the same time. The bolts are just to the side of the wheels, but only the wheels or the bolts are used at any one time. I agree with the comment of using casters on a screw on plate. You can use two fixed non steering, and two all direction plates, or use all direction plates. I liker the latter better.
--
Jim in NC


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In case anyone remains interested, I put a scale drawing of my rendition of the the mobile DP baseboard that you-all helped me with this week.
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Take a look if you like. I should probably round off the outside corners for the sake of my ankles... The drawing should be good enough to help me select my materials. I'll fine-tune it after I settle on suitable castors/wheels.
Bill
Morgans wrote:

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Bill wrote:

DUHHH, 2 by 8's are NOT 8" wide (etc.)!!! At least I caught it myself! There's another illustration of why it's important to draw the picture... so you don't make screw-ups like that!!! To my credit, the 2by4's are drawn 1.5" by 3.5"...
Bil

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"Bill" wrote:

---------------------------------------- Once again a mountain out of a mole hill.
Consider the following:
3 Pcs, 1-1/2" x 7-1/2 x 31-1/2 (Cut from a 2x8x96")
2 Pcs, 1-1/2" x 3-1/2 x 31-1/2 (Cut from a 2x4x96")
2 Pcs, 1-1/2" x 3-1/2 x 29-1/2 (Cut from a 2x4x96")
Assemble in a 31-1/2 x 29-1/2 configuration with 3" deck screws grinding off a deck screw tips that break thru.
Mount a 1/2-13 Tee nut in each corner adding a 1/2-13 x 3" carriage bolt and hex nut to lock bolt in place.
These will serve as adjustable mounting feet.
Add 1/2-13 Tee nuts as req'd to secure drill press foot plate with 1/2-13 hex head bolts and washers to the wood base.
Want to move drill press?
Grab 2 wheel moving dolly you all ready have to take the trash cans to the curb and you're in business.
Don't have a dolly yet?
Get one.
Less than $30 and it will save your back
Lew
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On Sat, 8 Jan 2011 07:32:41 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

Hell, it'd be much easier to have him lag a pair of 3' long tubafores to the base through the provided holes. One tubafore, 4 lags, 4 washers, and Bob's yer uncle.

HAND TRUCK. (corrected your spelling, Lew) This is a dolly: http://tinyurl.com/3xg9yt5

Seconded. Buy a pneumatic-tired job. They're good for 600# and you can easily take things up and down stairs with them GENTLY. I have this one and just got some metal cut for fenders: http://www.harborfreight.com/heavy-duty-hand-truck-95061.html I wish I'd bought this one, with 13" wheels: http://www.harborfreight.com/bigfoot-hand-truck-97568.html
P.S: The thing speakers stand -on- is a podium. A LECTERN is what they stand -at- to speak.
-- You and I have a rendezvous with destiny. We will preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on Earth, or we will sentence them to take the last step into a thousand years of darkness.? -- Ronald Reagan
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Depending where you buy your lumber, those dimensions may not be all that accurate. I measure each board to insure the sizes are consistent. It is amazing the variation of sizes in a stack of 2 X 6's.
Of course, if you are going to rip them, it won't be a problem. It did not used to be this way. Now every manufacturer/retailer is a liar.
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Michaels" says...

The one who sold the contractor the lumber to build my house sure was. Went to replace a floor joist and was surprised when a 2x8 wouldn't fit-- it turned out to be 1-1/2 x 7. And built in the '60s so can't blame antiquity (although the '60s being the '60s one _could_ blame altered states of consciousness).
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They should all start out the same size from the same manufacturer.
Lumber shinks differently as it dries.
I have a huge dip in my great room floor. WHen laying the hardwood I went to the basement and laid a level across three joist...all about level. Then I measured the width of the lumber and found 11.25 down to 10.625" right beside each other. Two years old. GRRRRRR.... They all started out the same from the same supplier.
In the 60's wood sizes were changing to consistant dimensions. Not sure when it actually happened bu the slide from actual 2x4 took many years.
The one who sold the contractor the lumber to build my house sure was. Went to replace a floor joist and was surprised when a 2x8 wouldn't fit-- it turned out to be 1-1/2 x 7. And built in the '60s so can't blame antiquity (although the '60s being the '60s one _could_ blame altered states of consciousness).
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I would put the wheels inside the rails, not outside, your ankles will thank you if you do that.

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J. Clarke wrote:

I think that's a good suggestion. I like decreasing it's foot print's width by 12" too! Thank you!
Bill

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I think this is about the last version in case anyone would care to see the pictures (3). This version is more streamlined--maybe I'll leave the "license plate"... lol!
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Thanks, Bill
Bill wrote:

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Fixed or swivel casters (no 'O')? Final dimensions? (all 3, please)
I'da lagged on two tubafores and slid it on a metal sheet when I needed to move it. Or eyebolted the 2x4s and slid it on those.
-- You and I have a rendezvous with destiny. We will preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on Earth, or we will sentence them to take the last step into a thousand years of darkness.? -- Ronald Reagan
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Larry Jaques wrote:

swivel castors (I just grabbed the first think I could find from the "SketchUp Warehouse" for the diagram).

37.5" x 30" x 6 1/4" including lug "feet" (I'm over 6' tall).
I was tempted by the fancy "Nut Levelers" krw wmentioned (which have 1.5" flexible bases) over the primitive "hex nut feet" (found on the end of a standard 1/2" bolt). However the latter have nothing to break or wear out.
Similarly, on the "Corner Bracklet Levelers" krw mentioned. They would seem to be great until their connecting screws need to be tightened--and then, if you'll pardon the pun, you're screwed (because the frame on this will not be easily accessible. In my experience, screws of that nature, even on some of my chairs, get loose.
Both of thse pieces of hardware are very interesting though--I am glad to learn of them! If the "hex nut feet" have shortcomings in performance, maybe they can be be overcome with appropriate castors or the like. The difference, compared to the corner bracket levelers, at least, is the accessibility.
Bill
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Actually, these were the ones I was thinking about (kinda expensive though):
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page#09&filter=leveler
The advantage is that the screws aren't taking weight. You worry too much.

You didn't understand the product. You drill a hole through the top surface. The screw heads (hex or slotted, depending on the device) are then exposed. This is great for uneven floors, as garages tend to be.

The idea of the corner brackets is to get the feet as close to the corners as possible. In your drawing they're too close to the center. Is I mentioned, any of the base hanging over the feet is worse than useless. Get the feet as close to the corners as possible (i.e. make the base as small as possible).
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Okay, I got it now. I didn't realize the intent to drill through to the top. Only 3/8" diameter. Interesting product, priced well. You suggested I worry too much but I think it's worth worrying about dust jamming the hole/nut, x4.

Yep, I agree. They should, and will, be moved closer to the corners. Thanks!
Bill
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Nah, a screwdriver will clean that out in short order. ;-) Sawdust won't build up in the corner levelers. It'll just fall through to the (open) bottom. The others might have a problem with sawdust clogging the holes.

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Not really an issue. My table saw and my radial arm saw both have adjustments that one performes by turning Allen screws recessed into the tables. While they get full of dust, the shop vac or dust collector will pull it right out. On rare occasions I have to take an awl and pry a chip out.

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