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Michaels" says...

Which is why companies run by dyed in the wool safety freaks tend to go under.
If there is no such thing as overkill then one would rip up the floor and pour a new footing for each tool.
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That sounds like a trip hazard, though it would probably be better on the feet than a concrete floor.
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"dadiOH" wrote: .

--------------------------------------- That's why 1/2-13 T-Nuts and carriage bolts exist.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Sorry, I'm not sure of the point you made (about these nuts and bolts).
Bill
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I wrote:

"Bill" wrote

-------------------------------- Adjustable feet. Put one in each corner.
Lew
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I would consider using 4 - 4" free casters, inset so they only raise the platform an inch or so. At each of the corners, put a 1/2" lag bolt with a hole drilled though sideways at the top to put a small bolt to use as a handle like a small C-clamp. You could use machine bolts, but then you would need to weld some brackets to secure a nut, ect.
The idea is to roll the machine to a location, then thread the bolds deeper into the base, which lifts the rollers off the floor. Only take a few moments to have a self leveled base set up. I use a heavier steel version for my industrial delta 10" cabinet saw.
--
Jim in NC


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Morgans wrote:

Interesting idea Jim. If I understand your design, to move the DP, you have to lift one corner of the base manually, pull the spindle castor down, and then put something (say a lag bolt) in the hole to stop the spindle on the castor.
Not having much experience, I was thinking that the wood might fracture on the bottom of the base unless the spindles are at least a couple inches long--but I guess the wheels alleviate some of that sort of stress when they are rolling.
Should I see what sort of wheels Harbor Freight has in stock, or is this a $100 feature..lol. I find the idea very clever!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Does anyone see a way to combine Jim wheel idea with the rectangular base built out of twobyfours using overlapping joints that we were talking about earlier? I can't see that those wheels have anywhere to hide in the base unless I add in an "axel" for each of them. It's been good food for thought. I'll keep thinking on it. Mobility is good.
Bill
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While I disagree with the idea of a mobile base for a top-heavy DP, you can buy them already built for $70 from Grizzly. Just add a couple thicknesses of 3/4 baltic birch ply for a bolt-down base and Roberta's yer auntie.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Heavy-Duty-Mobile-Base/G7314Z
-- Some people are like Slinkies ... not really good for anything, but you can't help smiling when you see one tumble down the stairs.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Much of the value, for me, is in learning how to do stuff myself (but I Know I don't need to sell you on that). You have to start somewhere, so I'm starting at the bottom on this project! ;)
A few years ago, in another forum, folks were giving me a bad time because I was interested in carving my own banjo pegs (while there are machines that can spit them out faster than you can talk about it). The end that matters is done with a tool resembling a pencil sharpener--which of course, if you look in the books, you can build yourself if you don't want to fork over the $40-$80. Reamer for where the peg goes, extra. If you want to carve pegs for a viola or another instrument, you'll mostly-likely need another set. Even if you do buy the pegs, you'll need to at least buy the reamer to do a proper fitting. Maybe in the coming years we can finish this instrument together...
Bill
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That's precisely why I buy magazines. People who have invented very expensive items advertise them there with large, detailed pictures. I use those to make my own, being the chea^H^H^H^Hfrugal guy I am.
I took the best features of the existing glare guards and came up with the lightweight, tough, very durable laptop glare guard which I sell.

Sometimes it's easier to buy premade items like that. But you can just as easily take a look at the tools used, and then make one yourself. Existing plane irons can be retasked into tapered peg sharpeners. Finding used tapered reamers is usually not too hard, either.

What are the custody agreements, sweetie? (Viola, NOT banjo! ;)
I have an extra copy of FineWoodWorking's _Making and Modifying (Woodworking) Machines_ if you're interested. $12 delivered.
-- Some people are like Slinkies ... not really good for anything, but you can't help smiling when you see one tumble down the stairs.
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2x4 frame. A couple of layers of 3/4" ply on top. Casters bolted to ply underneath.
Gives a nice flat easy to clean surface, 2x4s give plenty of stiffness and hide casters.
As for the bolts, get some long cabinet levellers and T-nuts--should be able to find 'em at Home Despot, if not then Lee Valley has them. You can adjust the levellers from the top with a screwdriver or drill a hole to take a piece of welding rod or whatever for a handle.
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You could do it like my very recent post, or you could make a base (perimeter only-add wood for where the DP sits and bolts to the base) by laying two 2x4's directly on the floor parallel to each other. Add 2x4's at a 90 degree angle to those first two 2x4's to form the perimeter and more across the top to set the machine on. Don't make joints, other than the fact that the second layer is sitting on the first two on top of the first ones, and screwed together.
Mount the base type casters on the bottom of the second layers. If you used a 2" wheel, your base of the first two 2x4's would be off the ground by a little over 1/2". You could use taller wheels and longer bolts, or use 4x4's for the first two pieces and use 4" wheels. I never use less than that, or the wheels are too hard to move over slivers of wood and screws and crap that are on the floor.
--
Jim in NC


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Morgans wrote:

Jim,
Thank you for all of your posts this morning. I read them very carefully. I like your design above. I'll be looking for some wheels that have total height of about 4+ inches. You say "don't make joints" but I assume you intend butt-joints for the four twobyfours on the floor (otherwise it could be pushed over sideways?). The SYP going across the top will overhang by about 4 inches on the sides to account for the wheels which will be attached to them. I hope that doesn't end up feeling like a safety hazard. I may need to put up rails (like at the bank) so that you need to enter the DP area head on... LOL.
It's too bad I don't have a DP to help me drill those 1/8" holes near the ends of half-inch diameter bolts. Maybe I'll pick up a few extra drill bits while I'm at the store.
Thanks to everyone who has helped and to everyone who is following along. Mike, would you route with an ogee or a roundover bit around the top (j/k)?
(And to think, 3 days ago I was just going to mount my DP to a piece of plywood...and judging by my floor, the DP would never have been level!).
Bill

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Bill wrote:

You would have had one if you had just built the damn base instead of obsessing over it :)

I still would. Specifically, to two pieces each 3/4" thick.
and judging by my floor, the DP would never have been

It doesn't have to be. Or are you worrying about the ply sitting on a non-flat floor? The wheels handle that well enough.
--

dadiOH
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Bill wrote:

No. The lags are to manually thread up/down to lift the wheels off/on to the floor. __________

I don't know what you mean by spindles. Are you thinking of casters with a stem that goes into a socket? Don't...think of casters with a bolt on base. A plate. ______________

Lots of casters here... http://www.outwatercatalogs.com/lg_display.cfm/catalog/2010_master_catalog/page/1047/highlight/caster
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

I have a hard time visualizing that with the bolt on castor but I'll keep trying.

Yes, I was. Thanks.

http://www.outwatercatalogs.com/lg_display.cfm/catalog/2010_master_catalog/page/1047/highlight/caster
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Bill wrote:

What's hard?
1. A wood base with a plate caster in each corner.
2. A lag (or bolt and threaded insert) near each corner.
Turn the bolt/lag one direction and it goes down eventually touching the floor. Keep turning and it will lift that corner off the floor. Repeat with other three bolts/lags and the whole shooting match is off the floor and won't roll. Repeat in reverse and it will be sitting on the wheels and will roll.
Seems to me you have three decisions to make...
1. Do you want it on a base? Useful IMO.
2. Do you want it to be moveable? Personally, I find that desireable.
3. If moveable, do you want the ability to make it unmoveable. Again personally, I have never had that need or desire.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

I see. So the unit rests on the four lag bolts all of the time it is stationary. With the wheels on the bottom of the base, that means the lag bolts would have to extend beyond the height of the castors. Perhaps it shouldn't, but the thought of subjecting each bolts to 1/4* 260 poundse pounds of continuous force makes me hesitant. One good push and they all bend or snap??? Maybe I just don't fully appreciate the strength of a half-inch diameter bolt...they are pretty ominous looking... Maybe I'll try making a SketchUp drawing.
Thanks! Bill

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Bill wrote:

The reference to a "threaded insert" is very helpful to me. I assume it has some sort of flange and should thus be fit from the bottom. A washer and nut at the top, and two washers and a lock-nut on the bottom and it would be good-to-go, no? Maybe another threaded insert at the top?
Q1. Two attach the 2by8 SYP to the top of the frame (to which the DP is secured). I assume to use 2 3/4" screws with the top board pre-drilled. 4 of those on each end of each board ought to hold the darn thing down, no? It may also give me a chance to test out the 10-Amp DeWalt drill I bought myself on sale for Christmas. :)
Q2. I assume you position "coasters" under your lag bolts to prevent disintegrating the concrete.
Thank you for the lesson!!
Bill
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