Course hand saw for resawing

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Read. It says set your set by hand. If you need 2" wavy for your needs then do it. The taper is in the upper part as that is where the drag/tug occurs. Close to the teeth there is more power in the saw than drag. If you need more add more. If you are cutting a $50 board, then use what you want to do.
Martin
On 6/15/2016 10:07 AM, steve robinson wrote:

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On Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:39:27 -0500, Martin Eastburn

So you now finally agree ripsaws have set
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I ALWAYS said they did - from Zero to about .1" is the spec. Martin
On 6/16/2016 2:22 AM, steve robinson wrote:

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Not sure why I'm getting back in this, but no, it does not say "set your set by hand". It says the manufacturer of the saw performs the setting by hand (that particular manufacturer does pretty much everything by hand).
John
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They set to the middle ground. If you are sawing exotic and hard to get wood, you don't want a .25" kerf unless you have to. Set it yourself to the size you want for your specific job or use the generic set. Martin
On 6/18/2016 2:24 PM, John McCoy wrote:

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As I pointed out elsewhere in this thread, Lowes and Home Depot have them (they're crap, but they're there).
There are several on-line vendors of quality saws who will provide them sharped as a ripsaw.
John
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http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pF886&cat=1,42884,63338
https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/panel-saws-panel-saw-rip-cut-
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"Spalted Walt" wrote in message wrote: >>I haven't seen a ripsaw in a hardware store in 40 years.

I posted those references too... back on 5/30 before this discussion spun out of control! LOL
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You seem to be the one that isn't reading. See those words "heavily taper ground". Those are the only handsaws without set, and those are to all intents and purposes non-existant (I doubt any have been made since before WW2).
John
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Those are the saws that are used on Hardwoods. How many of you use a handsaw on hardwood ? Most use it on pine or sometimes ply. Fur and Pine are not hardwoods. If you have a lower cost saw it is for construction. If you have an expensive saw it is for hardwood or both.
Martin
On 6/9/2016 9:34 AM, John McCoy wrote:

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On Thu, 9 Jun 2016 22:05:48 -0500, Martin Eastburn

Many Hardwoods are actually far more resinous and softer than some softwoods
Oak, Elm, Teak will not cut without set infact most hardwoods won't unless your using timber that has a moisture content below 10%
In years gone by it was rare to see timber off the rack hitting those levels as all timber was air dried
Most seasoned timbers came into the shop around 15 to 22%
Infact it was common practice to cut up your sections straighten and square them off then leave them in the building you were working on for a couple of months before you worked them .
The only exception was the old cabinet makers shops who would have a fire going year round , but the sections they used were small in comparison to general construction / joinery.
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What? I think I agree with Larry, you're just making absurd statements to troll the group.
Of course I use a handsaw on hardwoods. So, I'm guessing, does everyone else in the group (you, perhaps, excepted). This is a group for cabinetry after all, not carpentry.
Offhand I can't recall ever using a handsaw on ply.
John
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2016 13:37:31 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

He is arguing about a specific saw that was marketed by disston for a very short period of time, suitable for one purpose fine accurate cuts in thin stock, if he bothered to check on the disston website , it also states that many tradesmen actually added set to the saw.
This was one of the reasons why it got dropped , although a fantastic product its market was limited as other saws were just as good but serviced a larger section of he marketplace.
The manufacturing process for sawblades in the 1800s couldnt produce the fine grade steel with suitable tensile strength , blades were generally a lot thicker than they are today to take out the whip .
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It's hard to tell, actually, what he's argueing about. He started out by saying ripsaws have a different tooth shape (true) and no set (false). Since then he's made a variety of ludicrous statements, most of which suggest he hasn't actually done any woodworking in decades, and doesn't really remember what he did.
John
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So you are an old school wood worker and are without a table saw, bandsaw (sliding table naturally) or any power tools.
I use a saw to touch up and do small work. I don't work myself to death sawing a lot of wood by hand. I use my mind not my back.
Martin
On 6/10/2016 8:37 AM, John McCoy wrote:

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Well, there's certainly no evidence in this thread that you use your mind.
Personally, I use the right tool for the job. I use a handsaw for cutting tenons, because I'm in no hurry and it's easier than setting up the tenoning jig on the table saw. I use a handsaw to cut long boards to rough length, because that makes them easier and safer to handle on the table saw. I use a handsaw for other small stuff, when it's easier or quicker than going to a power saw. Whatever is the right tool for the job.
John
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You appear to have a unique definition of "set". Since your definition is different from everyone else's, your comments are hard to understand.
Hacksaw blades have set. It's not alternate tooth set as would be done on a crosscut or ripsaw for wood, but the teeth are still set.

So are the teeth on a crosscut saw. As you say they are triangles (viewed from the top), the trailing edge of the triangle is full width of the blade.
John
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On 6/4/2016 10:31 AM, John McCoy wrote:

John look at a tooth. Rip is full width and is all there. A crosscut is angle cut to make and half of the metal is gone.
The shape and use of the tooth is completely different.
Martin
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On Monday, June 6, 2016 at 7:24:15 PM UTC-7, Martin Eastburn wrote:

The way to tell isn't to squint at the teeth; rather, make a cut and look at the kerf. A ripsaw makes a flat-bottom kerf, because the teeth are chisel-like with the edge perpendicular to the cut, while crosscut teeth have alternate bevel (makes a 'W' bottom kerf).
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Well, that would work. But on a sharp saw, the difference between a rip tooth and a crosscut doesn't need squinting, the reflection off a crosscut tooth is pretty obvious.
John
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