converting cuting list to materials list... need help

I am looking at a set of plans which has a very detailed cut list and am a little at a loss to convert that list to a materials to purchase list. For example, 3/4 x 2 3/4 x27; many such pieces on the list I have.
Is anyone aware of software that could help me come up with what I am looking for? Some cutting diagrams would be great too.
Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@accent-travel.com wrote:

Go to www.cutlistplus.com and download their free version. The learning curve is not too steep, and it's really practical. But, it assumes you already have material on hand that you are trying to use efficiently. You'll have to start off by lying to it. For instance, tell the program you have 100 pieces of 3/4 X 6" X 96" in stock (or whatever width and length you intend to buy). Then put in your cut list and the kerf width of your saw. It will show you the best layout to use the least amount of wood. Then, see how many boards it uses and only buy that many, plus one or two for screw-ups.
DonkeyHody "Every man is my superior in that I can learn from him." - Thomas Carlyle
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I had good luck with the free version from Drummond:
About Us A Brief History of Our Software
In 1986 R&R Drummond first released Plywood Planner for the Commodore 64. We developed our second release, CASP'er, (Computer Aided Sheet Planner)for the IBM-XT as the industry progressed toward the PC. With the arrival of Windows 3.1, we developed The ITEMIZER version 4, which supported a windowed, point- and-click interface. The ITEMIZER version 5, was designed for the Windows 9x operating systems. Version 6, added Power search routines that analyzed many more layouts.
Our current primary product is The ITEMIZER, which provides for manually re- arranging the cutting plans after they are automatically generated. Also, we developed Snap-It for hobbyists and the CutMizer Service for those who favor our expertise to do the cutting plans for them.
Snap-it has been discontinued in favor of MINI-MIZER, which is a limited ver- sion of The Itemizer and has more functionality.
With every new software release, we strive to improve the quality of our pro- gram and efficiency of the layouts, while adding useful support features. We regard customer feedback as a crucial part of the development process.
Our technical support is free and we strive to make it a same day service. Please don't hesitate to contact us. We are interested in your success and saving some trees can't hurt...
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www.Cutlistplus.com and www.sheetlayout.com
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Does sheetlayout do a better job than clp in laying out sheet good cuts?
Gary (just got clp and had minor issues laying out drawer parts on 5x5 baltic birch)
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The cut list programs are good, but have limitations. You can feed all sorts of information into the computer, but unless you know what the wood dealer has in stock, and where a knot may fall, it is of little value. If the cut list program says you need a piece 6" wide, but you can only find 5" wide boards, what do you do?
You must be able to figure out the total board feet you need. While a board foot = 144 cubic inches, 144 cubic inches does not equal 1 board foot. That example you give mathematically (.75 x 2.75 x 27) comes out to 55.68 cubic inches, but the real thickness for buying wood is 1", not the finished 3/4". IOW, it needs at least 74.25 cubic inches of raw wood to start with.
From some experience and perusing some of the available woods, you can figure out the right combination of boards to buy. That 3/4 x 2 3/4 x 27 is just over a half a board foot. If you need 6 of them for the project, you'll need just over 3 board feet, which means you'll probably have to buy 3 1/2 to 4 to get them all. If all you can find is 4" stock, you have quite a bit of waste. If you find 5 1/2 stock, you have more waste, but if you find 6" stock, you are in business. You need (2.75 x 2 + saw kerf + jointing) to get two pieces. One 8' board will do, but chances are, they come in 10' lengths and you have to buy the full board.
Factor in the other pieces you need. That 4" board is ideal if you also need some 1" wide parts also. You must take the list with you to verify all of that stuff.
I figure the total board feet I need, then plan to buy at least 10% more for waste, even up to 25% in some cases. Some is waste, some is eventually used for a small project or some other odd piece you need down the road. Some guys buy extra in case they mess up a part, but since I've never, ever, cut a piece of wood wrong, I don't factor that in. Nope, no need for me to do that, just those other guys.
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I successfully use a cut list program but I learned to use it. Use it to determine how many BF you need and tell it you can get stock 5" wide, or pick a number that suites you.
Buy that amount of BF taking in mind that you should allow for knots and or waste.
Measure your purchased wood and determine the usable sizes of what you bought and enter the pieces and sizes into the program OH inventory. Doing it that way you get pretty accurate results.
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