Clear finish for "wet look"

I am looking for a clear finish that will give the surface a "wet look". I am taking a project I am doing in MDF and using automotive sealer/resurfacers and fillers to get a glass smooth surface that I paint with a black lacquer. The surface is perfect, but does not have the "wet look" I am looking for. I think I can get that with an automotive DAU75 clear urethane, but that stuff is about $45/qt with another $35 for catalyst. Is there a cheaper solution that anyone has in mind?
I have tried the epoxy that Home Depot sells for things like bar tops. That does the trick, but it is hard to control and tends to run down vertical sides without a lot of attention.
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How about a high gloss water-based polyuurethane?
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FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

That is then, after curing fully, buffed to a fare-thee-well.
Bill
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eganders wrote:

Clear, high gloss, nitrocellulose lacquer, properly flattened and rubbed.
"Wet" looking does not necessarily mean thick.
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wrote:

That would be my recommendation. You will get the ultra high gloss for the clear look from buffing, not just from the way it lays on. Poly won't buff out well but lacquer will. Go to a music store and look at some high end guitars. They are usually nitro lacquer and some of them look like they're still dripping.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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I second this post.
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I still build the odd custom loudspeaker system. When I do, I go after a 'piano' finish. I sell two blacks: piano- and camera black. (Also 330.000 other AutoCryl colours) Both are the same product. Sikkens AutoClear. Piano is without a squirt of MattingClear.. Stupid money for the material, I know, but the only sure-fire way to get the 'wet' look with high build and durability. It is a pain to work with and safety is an issue. However, it sprays beautifully and lays down like glass. When you get to the final stages, you have no way of telling whether it is still wet or if it has dried. It is cheaper to buy the right product than to rub your fingers to the bone. I rent a spraybooth when I do this. And clean your equipment afterwards...with THEIR cleaner as the last step. I have been at this since 1976, always searching for a better way to get that mirror/wet look. The only switch I made was from DuPont's Imron to Sikkens products.
Oh...before I forget... as a finish for a cocktail table or bar top... NO liquid will leave a mark.
r
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Consider it added to my notebook. <G>
My M.L. Campbell dealer also does Sikkens.
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Sikkens (Akzo Coatings) is split into several divisions. The stuff I am talking about is automotive stuff. Their stains and paints are handled through a different network.
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Could you refine the last statement a little more? Do you mean by no liquid, either hot or cold will leave a mark or white ring where the glass has been set down?
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Well, if it's better than Imron then it's darned near indestructible. He said it was "Sikkens Autoclear" which is an automotive clearcoat. That means that it should stand up to being run through a carwash a few hundred times without any ill effects.
"NO liquid" is probably a bit strong, but nothing that I would want to drink should leave a mark.
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Liquids, hot or cold, which you can handle like a normal drink, stuff you'd actually put to your lips. Nope, won't hurt it. Alcoholic beverages won't touch it either. Not even the most vile liquid of all, Old Milwaukee, will leave a mark. *ducking*
I'm glad you asked for clarification. There are a couple of members who will cite some obscure paragraph PROVING that Sulphuric acid at 1100 dC WILL leave a mark.
In one test, we actually used an off-the-shelf paint remover. Circa 1792(IIRC?) was the brand. Just dulled the shine a bit, quickly polished right back up with some compound. I am told that the automotive boys now have paint removers which will touch it. Maybe someone here can shed some light on that.
So, day-to-day normal use will keep that top looking new. Even a well attended commercial bar (on solid oak, 5 coats) has no stains on it. At the waiter's station, there is some wear from the aluminum trays, but after 5 years, still looking pretty good. I would dare say, that it wears about the same as solid surface. And, most importantly, it doesn't look like that cheap super-thick epoxy. If there is a more wear and stain resistant, great looking finish available, I'd love to hear about it. I know there are finishes which get you there most of the way for less money, but I doubt there is a better one.
I'm always open for suggestions, because my method is expensive, but my customers are happy. It also puts the quotes into a range where solid surface pricing starts looking attractive.
r
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