Circular saw recommendations?

Page 6 of 9  


LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2011 9:08 PM, Max wrote:

...
...
A quick search didn't find a distributor w/ online prices listed for the larger OSC saws but a 2000 review of the 10" in FWW had it listed for $2500 or thereabouts; I've probably underestimated the larger based on that.
I did see that Freud and some of the others now have 16" blades in the $100+ price range; I guess the larger cutoff saws have generated some demand. I might have to explore what is now available; I'm still using the same blades I got with it originally; they're much heavier than what one is used to; almost like a (very) small sawmill blade. Hence, at the rate a small shop uses them up they can be resharpened almost indefinitely unless one were really, really abusing one with highly abrasive woods or huge amounts of dirt or foreign objects in reclaimed material.
That was the hardest on blades in VA; we tried to reuse as much original material as possible from those old places and would also buy or dive material from scrap of others that were being razed or gutted by those who didn't try to refurb but just built new inside the old structures(+) as raw material sources for those we were refurbishing/restoring.
(+) We tried once bidding the demolition on one of these w/ the idea we would retrieve instead of just demolish and lost our shirts. The contract had a time performance penalty and in the end to meet it it was either go to the demolish route or hire so much extra labor to salvage what we needed that it didn't pay. :( It was almost heartbreaking to see what went to burn piles out of some those places...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/10/2011 9:04 AM, dpb wrote:

Well, not _too_ badly...
<http://www.tools-plus.com/original-saw-3541.html
(Of course, this is just the "entry-level" model... :) )
If one really were looking for larger RAS, the place is the used market; they really don't bring top dollar. Of course, you'll generally need 3-phase power or a converter; very few industrial will have single-phase motors just as most Unisaurs or PM66 or other gear from such sites will be. Still, for equivalent $$ one can get a lot of machine.
What I still covet is a 16" or larger Crescent or similar old jointer; I just don't do enough work to justify it any longer. A local shop in Lynchburg would give us evening/night access to theirs...what a joy to surface an old 3x12 or such salvaged old-growth beam in a single pass on the way to turning it into panels or other architectural details...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I, for one, just love old timber wood and water-logged salvaged wood. This link might interest you.
http://www.aquatimber.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/10/2011 2:28 PM, Robatoy wrote: ...

Hadn't seen that particular one, thanks...there are several.
In the US SE there's quite a lot of cypress and SYP being reclaimed the same way; lesser amounts of other hardwoods (obviously, given the indigenous species).
It just pains me to the core to see old timbers go under the wrecking ball that are perfect inside needing only a little TLC to remove the foreign material and resurface or resaw... :(
Heck, I save every old tuba-X from the old sheds and barn addition and everything else out here and will eventually use most of it somewhere...it's only 100 yr-old (roughly) SYP but there are 18- and 20-ft 2x6 w/o a knot or more than very small ones all over...
There are some more recent vintage (late-50s) 20- and even a couple of 24-ft 2x8 and 2x10 Doug fir joists in the haymow leftover from when we built the feedmill and associated bins into the loft. I can't imagine what one of those would cost at a lumber yard today if one could even find such a thing...
I'm not sure what I will do with them; I can't bring myself to cut them up... :)
I've a picture or two of the barn under construction just after WWI--the cost of the timber used for the scaffolding would cost more than a good sized house finished today, I'm sure... :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw a couple of old houses being demolished in Buffalo the other day. I was pleased to see how they were doing it. The organization is "Buffalo Reuse". See:
http://www.buffaloreuse.org/GreenDemolition/GreenDemolition
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/10/2011 3:31 PM, Nova wrote:

Kewl...
Was too young back then to have thought of their expedient... :) (or :( more like it) altho access would have a trick where the particular house was located w/ large equipment like shown there. But it's the trick for speeding up the demo but still have mostly salvageable stuff in the end. Hate to see the old plaster castings/carvings in ceilings, cornices, etc., get destroyed as well...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/10/2011 2:15 PM, dpb wrote: ...

_Just_KNEW_ shouldn't have mentioned that; that got me to drooling again...
<http://www.mlsmachinery.com/onlinecatalog/imagesFrameset.asp?id &354&pic=2&size=0>
I asked for a quote; we'll see what they say... :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When you see 3 belts driving a cutterhead, something serious is about to happen. <G> The SIZE of that beast! So... they're going to ship it UPS?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/11/2011 10:10 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Yeah, they'll just load the UPS truck on the semi, no problem... :)
From FL out here will have to enter in to the picture for sure. I bought a JLG 40H 40-ft boom manlift the year came back to the farm owing to needing the reroof job on it and the house plus several other high jobs could see including trees. Broker was in FL while machine outside Chicago--he had arrangement w/ private trucking and guaranteed it for $600--ended up costing $800 but he kept his bargain. It weighed about 12k lb and took up most of the load; if they can find shared load one of these is probably about 2000lb and doesn't take up much space so shouldn't be _too_ bad but it's been a while since I've shipped something sizable; fuel surcharges have to be a factor.
I've not heard on this one; they sent a $3500 quote for a 12" Crescent w/ a "make an offer" disclaimer. I'm sure I'll manage to fight off the urge, but it's a temptation, sure... :)
BTW, they've a nice-looking 16" General up north closer to you; somebody has even retrofitted it for single-phase...
<http://www.mlsmachineryusa.com/onlineCatalog/details.asp?cat 70&auct=0&liq=0&id%925&p=1&rpp>
That'll prep some stock for the carver... :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Awww maaaan..... they have CNC's too......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/11/2011 8:16 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Go for it...you know you _need_ it.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Infeed" and "outfeed" are meaningless terms when talking about cross- cutting on a RAS. It's a lot easier to lay the thing on the RAS table and prop up the ends with saw horses or stools or a rope tied to the ceiling than it is to work out some kind of movable or low friction support for the ends as is needed with a table saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2011 3:42 PM, J. Clarke wrote: ...

I never talked about "infeed" or "outfeed" (intentionally, anyway; I won't say I didn't write something confusingly inadvertently :) ); there I was indending the directions to be those when ripping.
It may be easier for a one-time deal, surely; but the solution (and imo which isn't so humble :) ) the only way to have a RAS workstation is to have it in a long table that supports the largest majority lengths of material used for both crosscutting and ripping. Mine sits in a 20' section w/ roughly equal distances both directions. Now granted that's a little more than most have room for but it now sits in the alleyway of the barn that's 66 ft unobstructed so it's not a problem. The 20' is because it fit the full length of the garage wall shop in TN and I've not enlarged it.
Again, of course, this is a 16" puppy and I had it that size owing to doing mostly ante- and early post-bellum renovations in Lynchburg, VA, and surrounding counties when I got it to handle the sizes of materials we were finding in them.
I'd have been happy w/ a 14 or even 12 but got lucky and an acquaintance working at the old Lane furniture (then the new production facility was almost new) got me a deal on this one out of the old facility in Alta Vista.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2011 7:08 PM, dpb wrote:

He who is plonked is a little slow and prides himself when he can find a statement that can be understood in a way. Helps him think of himself as an expert. They are in feed and out feed tables as you mentioned, making the comparison to the TS. As you well know they don't change names because you happen to use them for cross cutting also.
Did I just say that? ;~0
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2011 7:26 PM, Leon wrote: ...

Chuckles...speak clearly into the microphone, please...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
@swbelldotnet says...

If any part of a 2x10 fits onto the infeed or outfeed table on your table saw it must be an amazingly small saw.
You need an additional support for cross cutting long boards that is neither infeed nor outfeed but an end support.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Read it again. I do not know what YOU are talking about.... and that's okay by me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Roller infeed support or a 8+ foot infeed table is REQUIRED for any kind of accuracy on a RAS.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The usefulness of a RAS does not negate the fact that is proportionally easier to make a serious screw up than with any other power tool. A Big ol' beefy 12" Delta, from industrial yore, is a mighty fine piece of gear which will do things other devices won't. BUT, you best be really careful, be very alert, and make sure there's no hidden cuppage or twistage (suck on those two words, spelchucker) in your stock... or a know even. Now add the instability of the sheetmetal, stamped pieces of shit that Craftsman put out and you have amplified the danger by a large percentage. A sloppy arm with a wonky motor with crap bearings and a whirling, toothed wheel of death hanging, spinning in mid air over a work surface is just NOT my idea of a device that makes me all comfy-womfy in terms of safety.
BTW, all you proponents of the RAS... If you ever need to cut an end off a 12' x 1x6.. do what I do. A Swanson aluminum Speedsquare and a circular saw. I can get a pretty nice cut anywhere any time without first have to clean all the crap off the RAS table and move countless objects d'art so I can manoeuvre a hunk of lumber, through a shop just to do that simple operation on a very dangerous piece of crap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.