Centering router baseplate

My PC 690 with plunge base is mainly used to rout circles using a template and template guide bushing. The problem is that the bit is not centered in the bushing. I cannot move the bushing or the baseplate. The bushing fits tightly in the hole and the baseplate is attached by tapered screws in tapered holes.
Is there a simple way to correct this?
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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of the correct size and either drill countersunk, slightly oversized holes or flatten the taper in the existing holes. You could also goto http://www.patwarner.com/round_subbase.html Good Luck
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Gerald, to get a really close tolerance you may have to make your own. Basically you use the baseplate you have for the coutersunk screws that hold it to the router, then you install the new baseplate from lexan (or what have you) and plunge thru it with a 1/4" router bit. Now you get a perfectly sized hole saw(starret are good -lee valley I think) I beleive 1-3/8" and using the 1/4" pilot hole (the holesaw also has 1/4" pilot bit) you drill the bushing hole and with another holesaw you cut the relief for the bushing. This should make a near perfect centered basplate. I downloaded an article that told all this but I can't find it right now. Do a search for hitachi M12V router baseplate. I am on dialup but if you can't find it, ping me and I will look it up for you. Hope this helps. Good luck, Lyndell

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"Gerald Ross" wrote: :> My PC 690 with plunge base is mainly used to rout circles using a

There are at least a couple of solutions depending on the size of the circles.
If the finished circles are large enough to allow the use of a circle cutting jig, the problem goes away.
If the circles are to small for a jig and you are stuck with a guide bushing, then as others have suggested, make your own baseplate.
Lew .
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Make your own baseplate... mount it on the router base and plunge a bit through it to get a centered hole. -- JeffB remove no.spam. to email
Gerald Ross wrote:

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Here ya go Gerald. It is a repost of the original website I got it from but is the same article. It is for the M12V hitachi router but the basics are the same for any router. Lyndell watch the word wrap
http://www.canadianwoodworking.com/forum/showthread.php?p 421
----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2007 9:14 PM Subject: Centering router baseplate

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You can get close; see pin & ring system, ask for instruction sheet if desired. ****************** http://patwarner.com/sundries.html *******************************************************************

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wrote:

1.) Drill the tapers out to flat bottomed holes of 1/2 the base thickness. Slightly enlarge the screw holes. Replace the screws with flat heads, leaving them loose. Install the bushing and a centering cone. Tighten the screws.
- or -
2.) Make a new baseplate out of plastic, 1/4" ply, MDF, or hardboard.
If you've got extra bases, mark this one as centered with a Sharpie. Each time you use it, simply check the centering with a cone, and you're good to go.
As far as #2 goes, it's a good habit to get into. Lot's of times, a square base, bases with larger or smaller holes, etc... are handy. Making a base can be done in minutes, usually with scrap material.
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Bonehenge (B A R R Y) wrote:

Thanks! You win the prize- A free vacation in Tadzukistan. This sounds like the simplest correction so far.

--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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wrote:

Thanks, but one minor correction is in order.
Replace the existing flat head screws with round heads. A flat interface between the back of the new screw head and it's mating surface is required.
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On Fri, 28 Dec 2007 17:05:34 +0000, Bonehenge (B A R R Y) wrote:

Pan head screws would work better. Flat on top and bottom so they won't have to be recessed as far as the round head ones.
BTW, the DeWalt 618 (I think that's the number) comes with the oversize holes, the panhead screws, and a centering cone. Works great.
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On Sat, 29 Dec 2007 08:41:35 -0800, Larry Blanchard

Bosch does the same with the 1617, but they make you get your own cone.
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