Can router tear out be prevented.

I just build a cabinet largely with my router. I got more tear out than I was happy with. I tried one pass, treee passes, hitting the wrong side, going slowly, going fast; nothing helped.
Any suggestions. I was almost desparate enough to try masking tape.
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need more info. Tom Wade roted:>

Someday, it'll all be over....
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going
A few things I've found that have helped are a sacrificial piece of wood butted up against the end of the piece experiencing the tear out. Another method is to do lighter cuts. However, the most effective method I've found to eliminate tearout is to route a piece of wood longer than needed and then cut it down to exact size with the tablesaw. Not always possible and certainly is a little more wasteful, but there it is.
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A longer piece is a good idea, too. AFA tearout in the middle of the cut, lighter passes takes care of a lot of that. And wood choice. I found Oak to be very brittle. Also, I always try to route using a router table to eliminate another factor in bad product: me.

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Do you mean on the ends? If so, clamp a piece of same-size scrap to the edge and just continue the route onto that.

going
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hardwood or ply? free handed router or table? what kinda bit? how much stock removal on a pass? how fast are you going?
Wade Lippman wrote:

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On Fri, 03 Oct 2003 04:17:08 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

I don't use a router very regularly, but the quality of the bit is usually in direct proportion to the price. Don't skimp on router bits. Buy good brand name bits like Freud, CMT, etc.
Also, check which direction the grain runs and go with the grain. In woods where the grain changes direction...well, you're on your own.
I don't know what "hitting the wrong side" means. But, I've read somewhere that doing a climb cut helps eliminate tear out, but be VERY careful when doing this.
As a last resort to your Normite ways you could try using moulding and panel raising hand planes. :-)
Layne
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Ditto - here's what I found:
1) When routing all round including end-grain, first do the ends first, so that when you do the sides the bit routs away the torn-out part.
2) Using an end-block tightly clamped to the tear-out end of the work, of a timber of similar (or greater) hardness should prevent tear out.
3) you can start at the 'wrong end' of the end grain and gently 'back-up' the router holding it very firmly and moving slowly (but avoid burning) for about half an inch will shape the tear-out end without splintering. Then you can rout the right way as normal.
Also make sure the mits are sharp and clean of pitch build-up.

going
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On Fri, 03 Oct 2003 04:17:08 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

If the tear out is at the end of a board, clamp scrap to the end, and rout right into the scrap, or rout the edge before final cutting to length.
If the tear out is mid board, mind the grain! It sounds as if your possibly routing the wrong way. Think of the router bit as a plane blade, and you'll probably better understand what I mean. If all else fails, this guy <http://www.patwarner.com/ has some excellent videos and books with pictures that can help explain proper direction.
Check your library, they may have the resource you need, and you've already paid for it.
Barry
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On Fri, 03 Oct 2003 10:21:42 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .
said. . .:
snip

amen to that. . . the local library is a great source for books and magazines... my local "branch" library actually ordered a subscription to FWW after i suggested it might make a good addition to the periodicals collection
Traves
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On Fri, 03 Oct 2003 06:19:32 -0500, Traves W. Coppock <newsgroups-AT-farmvalleywoodworks-DOT-com> wrote:>local "branch" library actually ordered a subscription to FWW after i

I've found many librarians to be extremely helpful to anyone who actually uses the place. I think the good ones get great satisfaction from making their library as usable as possible.
Don't forget, these folks often have to fight for their municipal budget money, happy "customers" help them keep a library they can be proud of.
I seriously doubt very many people go into library science with dreams of becoming millionaires, they usually love what they do.
Barry
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On projects that matter, I have made the habit of running the router "backward" around the object at least once. It will normally not cut the full profile because the bit is not being pulled into the cut, which leaves a small amount remaining to be routed. Make a final smooth controlled pass in the right direction. Seems to help me.
###### Keep the whole world singing. . . Dan G (remove the 7)

than I

going
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