Can I hang cabinets from metal studs?

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I am building some cabinets to be hung from as yet unbuilt wall.
I want to build the wall from 25 or 26 gauge steel studs (whatever they sell at Home Depot/Menards) instead of woood studs.
Will screwing the cabinets into the metal studs be enough support?
Brian Elfert
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 09:50:02 -0500, "longshot"

Why? If the cabinets have backs, and are screwed to the studs, why is this less reliable than screwing a piece of plywood to the same studs?
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Because the studs are only about 1/16" thick. The screw could easily be pulled back out compared to being screwed in to 2 or 3" of wood.
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Leon wrote:

What's the plywood attached to? :)
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I think metal studs are only designed to carry a vertical load, by attaching the plywood , you are spreading that load out over a 4' by 8' span
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enough to pull four screws out of the metal studs, it will not pull four properly-sized screws out of plywood, nor will it be enough to pull out, say, two dozen screws holding the plywood to the studs. (Numbers picked out of the air to illustrate the point. Direct relationship to reality should not be assumed.)
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The plywood is on the back side of the front face of the stud. The screws that hold the plywood go through the steel first and then into the plywood.
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 17:39:36 GMT, "Leon"

Where did this "2 or 3" of wood" suddenly come from?
I was commenting on the comment that said that "plywood" would be an improvement. But this very same plywood screws into the very same studs, so I fail to see an advantage.
Now if you're suggesting a 2 x 3 stud inside the metal studs for a backup "nailer" then we are on the same page. That's what I would do. Pretty much like is sometimes done for door and window openings.

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OK, steel studs are 3 sided. Think of the letter C. The Plywood is attached behind the front face of the steel stud. The screw goes through the front face of the steel stud and then into the plywood. The screw has the thickness of the plywood to get its holding power. If the screw simply went through the steel stud it would strip and pull out of the stud. Then the cavbinet screws are screwed into the plywood.
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 02:06:49 GMT, "Leon"

Gotcha
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Brian Elfert wrote:

Is the wall in the basement? If so then no - too much rust potential. I would _guess_ at the same issue in a kitchen. Others may have different opinions.
...Otherwise someone else can answer as I don't know. But if I were making the wall I would install cross bracing where I was going to place the wall and "make it work". Probably by making sure those studs had "hangers".
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www.mcfeeys.com sells cabinet hanging screws for use with steel studs

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As others have said, no unless plywood is added where the cabinets are to hang. Why would you want steel studs? Do you live in Hawaii where termites are a significant problem?
Dave
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Weight. Wood studs are much heavier than steel.
I'm converting a semi trailer to an RV. I plan to use 2x3 metal studs to frame walls inside of the regular trailer walls. I can then add wiring and insulation easily. the cabinets will hang on these walls.
Brian Elfert
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writes:

Considering the weight of a semi trailer, do you think that wood studs would make a noticeable difference considering every thing else that will go into the trailer. Is 14,600 pounds going to be much worse than 14,000 pounds?
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snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net says...

When in doubt, Build it stout!
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lgb wrote:

I think steel is stronger, isn't it? when I worked Demo for a summer, the steel walls where a lot harder to tear down. just one steel stud will flex and bend etc. be get two or more secured and there very secure, could be wrong, just what I remebered
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I can't imagine steel studs are stronger than wood unless you get into 20 gauge or heavier. Do they even make load bearing walls from steel studs like they do with wood studs?
The fact that steel studs flex so bad is probably a sign that the studs are not very strong.
I don't need strong walls for my RV. I just need walls that can hold wiring and insulation along with holding up cabinets.
Brian Elfert
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Brian Elfert wrote:

Your solution has already been posted, Brian. Take your choice: Transition to wood studs where the cabinets will be hung or, and this I think is the winner, use the 2"x6" notched to backup the steel studs.
As for the strength, the metal studs which I've seen installed used construction adhesive AND screws to fasten the wallboard. Think torsion box when that job's done. The weak point is sticking those screws through that thin piece of metal and then subjecting it to the weight of the cabinet trying to pull it out. If it was merely the shear force of the cabinet trying to reach the floor you'd probably be okay but load that cabinet up and have a door that swings wide, etc. and you introduce other forces on that fastener which the steel stud may not hold all that well.
Just out of curiosity, how big is this semi-trailer RV going to be? contain? You just going to haul it some place (hunting area) and park it or actually travel around pulling it with a tractor?
As others have said, it's an interesting project. Hopefully you'll post some pictures as it progresses
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