Buying A Table Saw

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I have about $
I have about $500. to $600. to blow on a table saw I was at the local HD and saw a RIDGID 10 In. Cast Iron Table Saw Model TS3650 did some research on the web sounds like a nice unit. I was woundering if you all know of a better one for the money. It will be in a stationary place.
Thanks :)
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yeah, me too. Or less after Christmas Mike in Arkansas
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The Patt's wrote:

The herculift works well. The motor is adequate. It cuts well enough. The downside: A 2.5" dust port, not a 4", ligher trunions, service and parts issues are not very good, the fence is quite light (will it survive a decade of heavy use?), 3rd party add ons are harder to find, etc. All in all, for $550 or so it is a fine saw if you are not a heavy user and can live with the minor problems. I am not sure that there are "better" ones. The Jet has advantages, as does the Delta but they cost more and have shorter fences. Griz is nice as well and a bargain. My prediction: If you but it you will probable be satisfied but will not really love it.

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wrote:

Personally, I'd see if I could find a deal on a Delta Contractors saw. I think you will find it to be a little more beefy and while the fence could be better you can always add a better fence at a later date. You should be able to get very close to the $ 600 figure.
Mike
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I found two Delta 10" Contractor's saws in the local advertiser. Think one was about $125. Needed a motor, of course I have several 5 hp single phase 220v motors for $137 so the total price isn't too bad for a used saw. -Rick
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The Patt's wrote:

Lowe's has the Jet JWTS-10JF for $598, less 20% for a pre-tax price of $478. Factor in the $100 Lowe's gift card rebate on top of the 20% discount and you're under $400. I don't know how it compares to the RIGID but the price sounds good to me. Al
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You guys go on and on about the "RIDGID" CRAP!!! I advise anyone wanting to purchase ANY tool to do their homework first. Ridgid has a forum on thier website. READ THE REVIEWS!!! Most people outside the powertool industry don't realize that Ridgid "powertools" are NOT owned or operated by the Ridgid pipe tool company. Ridgid powertools are imported (from the lowest bidder in CHINA) by a company by the name of TTI. TTI leases the Ridgid name from the pipe tool company. Check out the local service. This thing is a piece of machinery just like a car. It will eventually fail. When it does, where will you get it fixed and how long will it take to get it fixed? The last thing you need is to be in the middle of a job and have your tool crap out on you and the repair guy tells you it's going to be a MINIMUM of 3 MONTHS before he even looks at it. This is the case here in New Orleans where there is only one repair shop for everything south of Baton Rouge. He's in no hurry to get your tool done because Home Depot only reimburses warranty claims to authorized service centers ONCE A YEAR!!! All that aside, Ridgid and Ryobi are HOME DEPOT ONLY TOOLS!!! Home Depot has an exclusive market for these tools. You can't go to the local tool house and compair prices....THEY DON'T HAVE THE TOOL!!! Home Depot sells the "select" tools from the major manufacturers i.e. DeWalt, Makita, Milwaukee, Porter Cable using a 6% markup. This I know because I sell tools and I see the price lists. NO BUSINESS CAN OPERATE ON A 6% MARKUP!! Where do you think they make their money? On the Ridgid, Ryobi, Work-Force tools, the $6.82 3/4" shackels, the $1.26 O-rings for your faucets. Do what you want with your money, but be advised, Home Depot and Lowes and all the "Big Box" stores aren't there for you to save money. They're there to make money. And, they're making it hand over fist at the expense of the un-educated and uninformed public.
wrote:

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duh

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Usenet babbles:
snip of lotsa nearly accurate stuff.

Yeah. You see YOUR price lists and think they're the be-all and end-all.

But you're there JUST to save the public money? No business is going to last if it doesn't make money. Even little one man stores have to feed, clothe and house the owner, so there to make money.
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
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On 14 Jan 2005 08:35:38 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

My price lists are not the end all and be all. I'm sure when you get as big as Home Depot and Lowes there is another SMALL price break.

No, Charlie, I'm here to make money just like everyone else with one exception; I'm not offering MY INFERIOR in-house brand to my customers at the same price as my Porter Cable, Makita and DeWalt. I'm also trying my damnedest to educate the public. See my followup to Barry's post.

Charlie Self

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Usenet wrote:

How come the two little guys I shop at beat HD on this stuff every day?
Do these store owners live in tents, out back? Are they registered as a 501(C) charity? Do the store employees donate time?
No! <G>
You need a new price list.
Barry
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Barry,
I never said that Home Depot sells everything at a 6% markup.
As for the two tool houses you frequent, no, their employees (the few they have) don't donate their time. The owners don't live in tents. And they are not charities. I never implied that they were.
I do, however, have a few questions for you.
Where do you do your comparison shopping on Ridgid and Ryobi?
What advantage would any company have in selling their product to only one distributor?
If Home Depot is the only retailer of Ridgid and Ryobi what would be the purpose in selling those brands at a 6% markup?
Are you a contractor?
Do you sell tools?
Do you work for Home Depot?
Do you work for TTI?
Do you work for Ridgid, Ryobi, or Milwaukee?
How many different models of the major manufacturers do your 2 little guys have?
How many tools do your 2 little guys have that Home Depot doesn't have?
What other services do your 2 little guys offer that Home Depot Doesn't offer?
Look, people, I'm not here trying to get you to buy any particular brand of tool. Ridgid, Ryobi, Craftsman, Chicago Electric, Emmerson, and any of these other cheaply made power tools have their place. That is, in the hands of homeowners and not in the hands of contractors and serious woodworkers. I really believe that Home Depot doesn't care one bit how much they rip off the american public. I know (and the knowledge is out there) these lesser, cheaply made tools (ESPECIALLY Ridgid) are in some cases being posed as equal in if not superior in quality to the tools put out by the major manufacturers. Ridgid power tools are of the same caliber as CHEAP Black and Decker tools with one exception.... Black and Decker knows their $39.00 circular saw is a $39.00 circular saw and they sell it as such.
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Usenet wrote:

I don't. I compare them on a tool by tool basis to other brands. So far I've bought one tool, a Ridgid jointer. The jointer served we well, and I sold to another person here on the 'wreck, after buying a DJ-20 from on of my "little guys" for $1099.

Why would I care?

There isn't any.
I understood your post to say that HD was selling DeWalt, PC, etc... at a 6% markup.

Many!
See for yourself: <http://www.coastaltool.com/ <http://www.toolsplus.com/
In store prices are often lower than those on the sites.
I'm not the only 'wrecker who patronizes these guys. FWIW, both are across the street from HD stores.

Also many!

Only web service and direction to a tool repair shop for out of warranty repairs.

Smart users do homework before they buy, no?
I snipped some of your other questions for brevity.
Barry
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On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 20:36:22 GMT, B a r r y

Thanks Barry for proving my point!!!
The other guys don't live in tents or work for free or own a charity. Because they have the other tools and services that HD doesn't.
By the way I did notice that you completely avoided my last paragraph in my reply.
The HD brand tools (Ridgid and Ryobi) ARE NOT UP TO SNUFF    with the major manufacturers.
I'm sorry you feel the need to get so defensive about spending your hard earned money on something a REAL tool person thinks is crap.
I'm sure you also get defensive when you throw a bar-b-que and have Wal-mart brand pickels that you paid Vlassic prices for and your brother-in-law (who happens to be a chef) picks on you for your ignorance and arrogance.
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wrote:

Unfortunately, I'm totally confused what your point actually is.

Probably because I didn't feel it was relevant in my reply.

At certain price points, they certainly are, at others they're not. When I bought my one Ridgid tool, a 6" jointer, I felt the $379 price was an decent value. I still do.
Ridgid's new 5" ROS is a good looking tool at it's price point. I've never bought a Ryobi tool, as one has yet to fit into my plan.

My General 650, DJ-20, X5 band saw, Veritas & Lie Nielsen planes, collection of Bosch and PC routers, PC & Makita sanders, Makita and DeWalt drills, Senco nail guns, Hirsch chisels, Starrett measuring and marking tools, etc... are all crap? You're right, _I DID NOT_ know that.
I appreciate the education.
Thanks again!
Barry
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On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 23:19:45 GMT, Ba r r y

Barry,
As a tech. for the past 14 years working for both DeWalt and Makita and repairing ALL major manufacturers tools, and as a professional woodworker, and now as a salesman and repair tech. for a local distributor in the New Orleans area, I think I may have a little more expertise in the power tool industry than you.
And again, maybe you shouldn't be so arrogant and so pompas.
END OF DISCUSSION!!!
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"Usenet" wrote in message

Naaaah ... you just think it is.
Question: On your informed crap-o-meter, please rank, in best to worst, the following:
B&D, Ridgid, Ryobi power hand tools
... which seem to be favorite the choices of the yuppie housewife in her DIY mode.
Reason I ask is that someone fitting that description is asking me, and I don't generally buy those brands (except my older Ridgid planer, which I basically stole, and is still going strong (knock, knock))
Thanks for the public service, cher. ;>)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
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To the question of margin, Usenet clearly does not understand the dynamics of a competitive marketplace. Let us assume that Ryobi has no sustainable cost advantage over other manufacturers. The price (margin) that can be charged at retail, therefore, is constrained by the retail prices (margins) of competitive product. Having the exclusive ability to sell a product does allow one to set prices freely without fear of price-shopping on any exact model. Selling that product into a competitive market against more widely-available lines means that unless there is a premium value to the brandname, unlikely in the case of Ryobi, then the profit-maximizing price will be the same as if the product was not sold exclusively by a single retailer.
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Another issue related to this discussion is the price pressure the big boxes can exert on the manufacturers. While the spread between the big box's retail price and other sellers cost may appear to be trivial (e.g., 5-10%) it is likely the big box extracted price concessions from the manufactuers that yields them a spread of 20% or more. Home Depot and WalMart are two widely cited companies who exert this kind of pressure.
One example I'm familiar with due to geographic proximity press and knowing one of the former executives is Troy Built garden equipment. Troy Built filed for bankruptcy reorganization a few years ago because they gave such big price concessions to Home Depot that they were cutting their own throat. What they didn't understand was that not all business is worth having... they were far better off selling through their traditional channels and doing lower volume. As I understand it, doing the higher volume to meet the HD contract demands raised their marginal costs and made them unprofitable.
John
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John Grossbohlin wrote: ...

...
Another example is Rubbermaid which was forced into bankruptcy by their deal w/ WalMart...when WM went to China, Rubbermaid couldn't match price and lost the shelf space--then they could no longer support the ramped-up manufacturing space and there they went... :(
Buy WalMart (and other boxeers) and support the Communist Capitalist Chinese... :(
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