Brush cleaning question

Can I get some suggestions as to what makes the best brush cleaner for oil-based polyurethane. Applying multiple coats to gumball and candy dispensers can eat up throw-away foam & cheapo brushes.
Thanks to all in advance
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just stand it up in a jar of mineral spirits. when you're ready to use it, squeeze the excess out. This will leave enough ms's in the brush to allow better flow out of the poly on the next coat.
jc

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wrote:

I use regular paint thinner. If I'm using the brush soon, I'll leave it in the thinner. If not, I'll do a final cleaning with lacquer thinner before putting the brush away.
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Whatever finish you are using, always start by dipping the brush up to the ferrule in the cleaning solvent before you start. Let most of it drip off, brush some clean paper with the brush to remove the excess and then you are ready for the finish. Makes the clean up much easier. JG

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it first, of course) and use it without cleaning it particularly well.Or maybe at all. I have done this with brushes and forgot about them for literally months and used them without a problem. Worth experimenting with cheap brushes and when your swmbo isn't looking.
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says...

And then have water vapor condense on it before you dip it into your poly, thereby ruining your finish.
that might work with water baased finishes, but i'd never try it on an oil based (actually, i'd never try it, but the reasons would be better for oil based).
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@valid.com says...

experience: I did about two thousand square feet of oak and maple flooring and used this trick on lambswool and brushes and never had the problem.

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now, the possible condensation issue was the first thing that came to my mind.
be well, work wood:
jc
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storing natural bristle bushes suspended in diesel fuel or kerosene between uses. I have tried it and it works. (Although I can't attest to long-term results, they claim to have some brushes 15 years old in good shape doing this.) From their Q&A at http://www.epifanes.com/qanda.htm
:Devise a rack system (ie. coat hanger) that will hang your brushes :suspended just clear of the bottom. Fill the container with Diesel :(yes, Diesel) or Kerosene until the ferule (the metal part) is :halfway submerged. This will ensure that the bristles are underwater. :This is where they will live. When it comes time to use the brush, :simply rinse out the diesel two or three times with common mineral :spirit, spin and use. After use, repeat with two or three rinsings, :a spin and back in the diesel. This method will keep your brushes :clean and supple for years. we have 15-year-old brushes that are :in great shape. The diesel has enough cutting capability to keep :the varnish from clogging up the bristles but, is oily enough to :keep the bristles soft.
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Wash in used solvent, followed by two more washings in clean solvent followed by spinning the brush "dry," then comb it (a fork works as well as an actual "brush comb") and put it back in its wrapper. Pour the solvent from the second and third washings into the first jar of solvent to conserve it and keep it out of the waste stream. My ten year old varnish brushes are in better condition than new.
Never dip a brush in finish all the way to the ferrule. You'll never get it clean, and the bristles will never again lie smooth and parallel.
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wrote:

otherwise the next time you use it its like painting with a shaving brush.
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Whack it across the edge of your bench several times.
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bynot wrote:

12 hours using a foam brush. After using the brush, I simply put the brush in a ziploc bag until next time. I tried to remove all the air from the bag each time. Worked well for me, as I was down to my last foam brush.
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