brush puller

What are your recommendations for a brush puller?
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On 10/28/2014 7:14 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

Work hard. Take frequent breaks. Slow down when you start to get tired. Keep hydrated. Ibuprofen is your friend. Treat minor wounds promptly with antibiotic cream, and sterile bandages.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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Frank Thompson wrote:

If you've got a tractor with a frontloader I have a design for a device that will handle up to a 4 inch tree .
--
Snag



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On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 04:14:06 -0700 (PDT), Frank Thompson
Explosives.
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 04:14:06 -0700 (PDT), Frank Thompson
Needle nose pliers. Grab the wire rather than the spring and the brushes should pop right out of the motor.
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Ed Pawlowski posted for all of us...

Has the type of brush been determined?
Now Ed you are being too gentle. I would use: a slide hammer to jack them out. an air chisel and do a little trim job or blow torch.
For field work I use a flamethrower.
For a woman I would use the Rick Harrison Micro Touch or the shaver of the month club. I mean whom doesn't like those little shavers?
--
Tekkie

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On Wednesday, October 29, 2014 4:07:02 PM UTC-4, Tekkie® wrote:

My apologies for my lack of specificity. The type of brush is the plant ty pe.
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On 11/1/2014 6:25 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

What kind of brush motors do you use at the plant where you work? (I know; I'm being obtuse.)
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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All you need is some heavy rope and a pickup.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
mMLdm7RgQ
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I pulled an old pussy willow shrub from my back yarf years ago with my old Firenza (Vauxhall Viva HC/Magnum) using an old truck rim and heafy rope. Tied the rope to the rood, run it over the upright rim, tied to the bumper hitch, and give it a yank. Popped the roor right out of the ground (rim as close to the root as bossible to give good lift)
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On 11/1/2014 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

> >

Only time I took out a tree at my place, I used a sawzall, and a very large number of HF blades. That dirt and sand mixed in with the roots really smooths out the saw blade edges.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 11/1/14, 8:16 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I liked a pickaxe and a hatchet and a sharp sharpshooter. Dulling a blade isn't so bad if it's easy to sharpen. I might use a chain saw, but I'd clean up the root with a brush first.
If I could cut some roots, I could use a chain to yank the stump enough that I could cut the others.
Sometimes it was easier to cut the stump flush. One way was with a pickaxe and hatchet. The other was with a shovel, brush, and chain saw.
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On 11/1/14, 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I like the rim idea, but I bought a chain for stuff like that. Seeing nylon stretch made me very nervous.
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Watering works better because heavy rain makes the ground too slippery to pull on.
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wrote:

When wirking with a rope, throw a heavy blanket over it - or rie an old tire in the middle. Not enough energy in the rope to move the tire more than a few feet - or the blanket.
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On 11/2/14, 4:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The empty 4WD pickup probably weighed 2 tons. There may have been a ton or more on the rope, and it seemed to stretch a long way. If it was 50 feet and stretched 10%, that would be 5 feet. It seemed like a lot of energy to me.
I think it was 1/2" nylon, with a minimum strength of 5670 pounds. Ropes aren't required to spend 12 years sitting in classrooms, so a rope may not know its breaking strength. I guess that's why the safe load for 1/2" nylon is only 473 pounds.
In 1971 I worked on Alaskan purse seiners. Aft, on the starboard gunwale was an L-shaped pipe weighing about 40 pounds. At a certain point in making a set, it was supposed to be removed and laid on the deck. The deckhand who did it had decades of experience, but once he forgot. We saw the line catch it. A second later it was gone like a shot. It splashed 100 yards away. I was glad it didn't hit the skiff man. That showed me the awesome energy in stretched nylon.
After that, I served on a 900-ton ship. Depending on how the tide was running, mooring at the pier could be a special challenge. One technique was to come in fast and catch a bollard with the forward spring line. The nylon would absorb the shock, swing the bow to the pier, arrest the ship's motion, and start it backwards, where the aft spring line could catch it. The energy in nylon was awesome, but if it parted, the snapback could be fatal. I've just read that for that reason, manila is preferred for mooring lines.
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In wrote:

I agree, and I did think of that but I didn't mention it. That's because in my case it was 6 separate arborvitae bushes and two arborvitae tree stumps, so I was able to individually soak the ground in and around the roots of each one before doing the pull-out. Plus, mine were near a large driveway and I was able to keep the vehicle on the driveway while pulling out the bushes and stumps. But, when the OP said "brush", I was picturing a large area of brush and no easily accessible individual root systems that could be watered and soaked.
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In typed:

Wow. I originally wasn't going to watch the video since the name of the poster was so similar to a spammer's name.
But, I did watch it and it's a good thing that this was in a country where the driver of the pickup truck is on the right side. If one looks carefully, he apparently did get out okay. And, given the whole setup, it is hard to imagine that anyone could miss seeing what was obviously going to happen with this plan.
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Oren posted for all of us...

Chains don't store kinetic energy so they just break and you're done. Straps & wire rope do store it which make breakage spectacular. I'd rather be strapped than wire roped, these can be lethal!
--
Tekkie

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