Brad point drill bits

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Bill wrote:

If your bit and dowel as are they should be, the dowel isn't going to go in without much force which will likely break the dowel or split what it is going into . You need a hole the size of the dowel. Unless you make your own, dowels are normally hard wood. A 7/32 bit is to drill 7/32 holes.
--

dadiOH
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says...

Generally speaking you want to use a 1/4 inch bit for a 1/4 inch dowel unless you are using some kind of proprietary system with special bits and dowels.
7/32 would be the pilot drill for a #18 straight shank wood screw in hardwood or the clearance drill for a McFeelys #12, among other uses.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Thanks for the explanation. I know better than to try to put a square block in a round hole, but I was trying make sense of all of the "off size" drill bits I was seeing (like 7/32"). I know they sometimes cut off-size dado's to accommodate plywood that is thinner than it is supposed to be and I thought perhaps the situation was something like that. But your explanation (for screws) makes the most sense.
Bill
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Actually that is the exact way you would make your own dowels.
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It is reasonable to think this however in reality.....NO. To those that have done this before it is reasonable to assume that a 1/4" "store bought" dowel will either slide through or have to be pounded through a 1/4" hole. My experience has shown that dowels are not precicely made and their diameters differ slightly. Further, dowels are available in a wide variety of woods, birch, maple, walnut, and oak be the most common, some are hard some are softer.
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Define "made for them". Lee Valley does not manufacture, but they have a division that does. From the Lee Valley web site Veritas Tools (our research, development and manufacturing division) continues to be one of the most innovative hand-tool design firms in the world, producing unique and high-quality products.
Like every manufacturer, some parts are usually made by others. I've never been to their facilities to see what they have and what they buy, but I'd guess a mix. Companies that maker heaters or air conditioners buy motors. GM buys tons of parts, etc. Veritas my be buying forgings.
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wrote:

and many other tools, but also subs considerable product. Anything with the Veritas name is DESIGNED by Veritas/Lee Valley and a fair amount of the precision finishing and assembly is also done in house.
It will all be unique to them, not a copy of someone else's stuff although some is a specific rework of another company's product to make it their own (apparently their brad point bits which are high quality product modified to make them better - to Veritas design standards)
I guess in todays world that IS manufacturing.
My apologies
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thank you. I copied the list. There are a couple there with which I'm not acquainted. BTW, I noticed tonight that Home Depot had a 6 piece Brad point drill set for 14.99. I didn't bite.
Bill
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I bought a set from Rockler several years ago with 1/4" hex shanks. Most of them are fine, but I tied the 3/16" for the first time a few months ago, and it has the shank on crooked. They no longer sell that set, so I can't get a replacement. I used to think much better of Rockler. I am not amused....
Doug White
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Doug White wrote:

You are (at least) the 2nd person I've seen make that comment about the Rockler bits. I don't want to be not amused either. Thanks. Bill
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Stubby bits whip less, would be preferred for dowel joints. No experience with this make, just an example:
http://tinyurl.com/2da37jt
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http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00966264000P?prdNo=2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2
Don't know if they are good or not as I've never tried them . Lee Valley has some very good ones (made in USA last I looked) that were highly rated in Fine Woodworking a few years back. I've been using them quite a while and like them a lot.
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http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00966264000P?prdNo=2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2
Lee Valley has a set of 7 from 1/8 to 1/2 for 54--those are IIRC the top rated bit in Fine Woodworking's shootout.
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http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00966264000P?prdNo=2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2
I

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2081568/30005/170-Piece-TiN-Coated-Brad-Point-Drill-Bit-Set-With-Drill-Bit-Gauge.aspx
And
if that's too many...
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wrote:

Chinese bits. The TiN coating just makes them LOOK expensive and/or good.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

>http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2081568/30005/170-Piece-TiN-Coated-Brad-Point-Drill-Bit-Set-With-Drill-Bit-Gauge.aspx
The actually work fine, the ones that aren't bent. At that price you can afford to throw a few away.
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On Dec 3, 12:03am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Cheap tools are chrome plated for the same reason, to disguise cheap metal and poor finish.
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On Dec 2, 9:03pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I bought some TiN coated bits from Crappy Tire a few years ago. Like you say, it just makes them look expensive. They were obviously made from pot metal: did not stay sharp after drilling in wood and bent easily. The TiN coating also wore off quickly. Beware of crappy Chinese bits.
(Beware of Chinese anything -- you never know about the quality control, even in the best brands-- I just had to toss out a Chinese- made Makita 4-inch angle grinder a couple of weeks ago after very little use. Somehow, they are not very good at keeping the smoke in and it escaped from my grinder motor when I was cutting some 1/8" steel. I went & got me another Makita --5" this time--that said "Assembled in the USA", but I almost got the German Hilti for only a couple of hundred bucks more.)
Luigi
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On Wed, 8 Dec 2010 13:58:51 -0800 (PST), Luigi Zanasi

Weegee, did you cover up the warning label on top of the gearbox? Yeah, the one which states, categorically, "DO NOT SIT HERE". I'm sorry for your loss, nonetheless.
-- Invest in America: Buy a CONgresscritter today!
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On Wed, 8 Dec 2010 13:58:51 -0800 (PST), Luigi Zanasi

whiz-bang drill bits from a 'wagon jobber" Pretty expensive bits - were supposed to be the best thing since sliced bread.
When the guy came by a month or so later to see if he could sell us some more the boss told him they were GREAT - if all you needed them for was "drilling arse-holes in balsa-wood teddy bears."
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