Bolt threads


I need some knobs etc for a few jigs. I am in a metric country and cannot get knobs etc like your mail order companies have and need to order. I know what 1/4-20 and 5/16-18 means in Imp terms but what is a 10-24 thread?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 06 Aug 2006 11:07:30 +0200, Phil Hansen

.190" diameter @ 24 threads per inch.
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.engineersedge.com/screw_threads_chart.htm
http://www.sizes.com/tools/thread_screw.htm
http://www.skgrimes.com/adapter/index2.htm
Wilson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.190 dia. x 24 tpi

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom and Wilson gave good links.
History, As I Know It To Be: Early in 20th Century, machine tool industry and automobile companies needing machine tools developed a new screw bolt system (along with drill sizes with numbers and letters) for their needs. This need had to do with the torque applied to the machine bolts, which in turn required greater holding power on the threads before the threads failed. Bolts in the new standard had improved thread dimensions with complex relationships between pitch, depth, and other factors (like the steel used.) Out of that need came the Unified Thread Standard http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Thread_Standard
This is from a book for introduction to Machine Shop: "The term 'machine screw' refers to a system of numbering used to identify machine screws smaller than 1/4 of an inch. The number system refers to a series of individual screw sizes within both the Unified National Coarse (UNC, or NC) and Unified National Fine (UNF, or NF) Series..... <for example> is identified by the number 12-28. The First part for he number specified the gage size of the body of the screw. The second part of the number specifies the number of the threads per inch. ... For Machine screw 0-80, 0 specifies the size (diameter, 0.060 inches) of the screw, and the 80 specifies the number of threads per inch.... In the number series, diameters range from 0.060 to 0.216 inches (for the UNF standard.)"
Another article at www.wikipedia.org stated that in 1949, British, Canadian, and USA merged tread standards and included the imperial measurements bolt sizes into the UNC, and UNF threading standard for pitch, depth, and so forth.
Way more than you asked, I know.
Phil

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dang, you're like me...someone asks you what time it is, and you tell them how to build a clock ;-).
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I live in the US and purchase Metric handles from time to time for my tools, (Grizzly jointer), etc. that have metric fittings.
I get them from Reid Tool supply, https://reidecom.reidtool.com/xephr/qbe/homepage
I dont know if they will ship ex-US, but they get there supply from somewhere. Many of the items seem to come from Italian and German companies. So you might scan Reids catalog and search out the company names and see if they can provide local supplies. What part of the world do you live? I dont recognize the .za.
Darrell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

10-24 means a #10 shank (3/16 inch) with 24 threads per inch. Jim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 06 Aug 2006 11:07:30 +0200, Phil Hansen

I would just order one of the assortment kits and when you see it you will know more than we can tell you. You will also have a handy supply, just remember to mind your stock. I had to do the same thing for metric hardware many years ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 06 Aug 2006 11:07:30 +0200, Phil Hansen

Thanks to all for the explanations and links. Some useful info there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.