bisquick joiner questions

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That is an interesting technique. I'll have to find a few pieces of scrap and give that a try.

I live about a mile from the Everglades (a large swamp). Humidity is one thing we have plenty of :-)
John
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You buy yourself a couple of magic glue bottles first (coupel of bucks). One is a roller / brush / narrow nozzle for general gluing. The other is a specialist biscuit-slot filler and wiper. They aren't expensive, you don't need the $50 Lamello one. However biscuiting is a rapid build task with a lot of fast glue-up involved, so it's worth having something.
Then you glue the slots first. Keep the biscuits dry, because good biscuits in good slots won't fit easily if they're wetted beforehand.
Oh, and buy yourself a clean _white_ rubber mallet and don't let it get used for anythign other than carcase assembly.

Just recut. Sometimes you abandon it and recut a new slot alonglside it. I never worry about leaving odd voids of unused slots behind.

Don't do a), because biscuits are all a standard thickness.
I've never done b), and if I were tempted to, then I'd use rectangular biscuit spline stock instead of cut-downs. You can slide most biscuiters sideways to cut a slot.

I often freehand, but I'd advise the straight edge. It's often quicker (one clamp is quicker than 4 eyeballings)

I'd disassemble, but this is usually because I'd be short of space to make the next panel.
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Yes, I had noticed that a stout blow with the flat of the hand is often necessary to get the pieces to set tightly together. Which is kinda hard on the hands :-)
John
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It was written:

I have a rubber "dead blow" (shot-filled) mallet of black rubber and yes it will mark the wood, but covering it with an old heavy sock prevents that and lets me use one of those many socks whose twin has gone missing.
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On 13 Feb, 05:15, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry) wrote:

If you think black rubber marks the wood now, wait until someone has used it for breaking up bitumen / emptying the cat litter tray with it, and you didn't notice because it was already black.
With my white mallet, I can _see_ that it's clean.
I don't use my hands for this because they've often got glue on them.
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I see your point, but not even my wife would use a rubber hammer to break up asphalt!
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says...

Does she give lessons? I'd like to send my wife, and my mother, over ...
<wink>
-P.
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D. All of the above. Lamello makes a dispenser that will place a measured amount of glue into the slot and it is applied to the sides of the slot. Then put in a dry biscuit. Unfortunately, if you like to drop the biscuit virtically into the slot rather than slide it in horizonally like I do the glue in the slot on the mating piece sill drop out when you invert the board. In this case I paint the inserted biscuit with glue and then add the mating piece.

Recut if you can or put a little extra glue.

b.
ABSOLUTELY use a straight edge.

a.
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I recall a thread here years ago from someone who sanded his tabletop and the next day found that it had depressions in it, and coincidentally, they all seemed to be right where the biskits were. Very visible after the finish was on.
Turned out that he'd sanded within twelve hours of joining the panel. The biscuits had swollen, expanding the wood slightly, and then returned to normal size. He had sanded before they'd shrunk.
And at a wood show once a guy who was demoing a biscuit joiner said that glues these days were so strong the wood fails before the glue does, you might as well use the biscuits just for alignment, and not put any glue on 'em.
So for my last several panels I haven't put any glue on the biscuits or in the slots. Everyplace except where the biscuits were. Oldest one is two years old. No sign of a problem.
It appears as though there might be more than one way to do it. :-)
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When gluing up panels, there is no need for the biscuit, strength wise. In this situation, I don't glue them either. Try making a T joint with plywood though, and things are different. Even if the glue is stronger than the wood, the wood that you are gluing to is only 1/64" thick (the outer ply). In this case, glue the biscuit, it needs it.

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@gmail.com says...

Yeah, if I'm doing a benchtop or something from narrow stock I just use dry bisquits as locating mechanism also. But for mdf joinery or t-joints I sure do put glue on them. I often use bisquits in situations where they are the crucial long-grain surface in a cross-grain joint.
-P.
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I seem to recall some discussion here a few years ago in which someone pointed out that gluing the biscuits introduces moisture into the wood that can cause problems with the finish if not given ample time to dry. And since the biscuits are on the inside of the piece, it could take weeks for all the added moisture to wick out. In any event, for simply joining panels, the buiscuits are purely for alignment so glue is unnecessary, IMO.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

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