Biscuit joiner

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Oh noes!! Hurries!!! Maybe that $ 40.00 discount is still happenins!!!
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wrote:

O N E more day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!\
Actually with all the stuff I got I realized a savings of about $201 including tax.
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"Swingman" mused

don't vary all over the place in thickness.
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RE: Subject
I don't have a dedicated biscuit joiner, just use a wing cutter in a router when biscuits are necessary.
Other than having a dedicated tool with it's obvious benefits of keeping a tool set up and speed of operation, what else am I missing?
Lew
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That set up can not make some of the cuts that a dedicated Plate Joiner can make. Namely, a slot in the face of a panel to hang a shelf on.
For edge to edge, or edge to end applications you are all set.
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Leon wrote:
> That set up can not make some of the cuts that a dedicated Plate Joiner can > make. Namely, a slot in the face of a panel to hang a shelf on.
OK, gotta fess up, have a small straight bit for that one.
Lew
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Cutting a slot in the middle of the face of a board, such as would be made in an upright to hold a shelf.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I do the same sometimes, when I don't feel like marking out. I slot both edges at the router table, stick biscuits wherever I want and glue the edges together.

Other than the speed of whipping it out, you can't undercut a door jamb with a router. <G>
Stationary biscuit joiner tables do exist, and they're a lot like your setup in a router table.
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I don't own a plate joiner either, but have been doing the same sorts of joinery with dowels and a doweling jig. I've also pondered "what I might be missing". As best as I can figure it, the only thing I'm really missing is speed. From watching things like New Yankee Workshop, it looks like it takes less time to pull out a biscuit joiner and cut some slots than it would to pull out the drill, chuck up a bit, adjust a depth stop on the bit, and then move the doweling jig around and drill the holes.
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I used to use round dowels, and I wouldn't go back to them unless there was absolutely NO feasible way of doing anything else. Just seen them fail too often, partly because of the way they weaken the surrounding timber when there's not enough meat, partly because of gluing surface issues (a round dowel will always face a lot more endgrain than a correctly placed bisquit, and I am not sure about the total gluing surface but I bet a bisquit has more), and lastly I have seen a lot of dowels simply shear off, mostly where used in chair and armchair construction (spreaders, skirts).
Clearly there's no way of using bisquits for the spreaders so I think I'd use a proper mortise and tenon there. I'll get around to that set of chairs 'really soon now'. Chairs are something I have simply never gotten to make so far in over 25 years of building furniture :) Been meaning to do so for a decade ...
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T joints.
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CW wrote:
> T joints.
You lose me?
Lew
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Think shelves.

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CW wrote:

Ahhh... Good point.
Using biscuits to replace a dado or shelf track would be tough to do with a slot cutter.
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B A R R Y wrote:

I like to use honey or apricot jam to join my biscuits.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

First one is the ease and speed of setting out and marking and making the cut, but you said that yourself. Also, I have 2 planes of reference on my bisquit joiner, where your router only has one. What I cannot see is how you can make accurate bevelled/mitered slots with your router. Not the easiest job with most bisquit joiners either, I will admit, but do-able.
B.t.w. I fancy my Makita, or I could see myself using a Lamello, don't think I'd go for a DeWalt - they're clunky by comparison. Never set eyes on a PC here so far.
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Peter Huebner wrote:
> What I cannot see is how you can make accurate bevelled/mitered slots with your > router. Not the easiest job with most bisquit joiners either, I will admit, but > do-able.
Try to avoid miter cuts when at all possible, but if forced into using a miter joint, can use a straight bit in a table mounted router and a fence to cut a blind biscuit slot in the miter joint.
Lew
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Yeah... although Festool does address this and indicates that the tennons are coated with a material to lessen the possibility of swelling. Further, they say that if the tennon does swell, the excess width on the sides of the tennon will shear off as it is pressed into the hole. As it is right now, the tennons fit tight enough in the smallest hole that you cannot easily pull them back out. So far, not even with a pair of pliers. This is on the perfect fit mortise setting.
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One more note, those big buck tennons are about the same price as a biscuit assuming the same amount of wood mass.
The smallest tennons which would replace any sized biscuit are less than 4 cents each. Last time I bought biscuits in lots of 1,000 they were 3 cents each.
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Conversely my bottle of PC FF biscuits were more consistent than any of the others.

You know the drill, you should'a called. I betting the small Domino tennons would be stronger than the FF biscuits also. ;~)
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