Beginners Syndrome

Page 6 of 9  
On 11/26/15 11:50 AM, Swingman wrote:

The ear worked for me until glasses entered the equation. Now, it gets tucked up into the cap right in front of the ear. I'd like a more foolproof pencil holder. Perhaps one of those magnets that clip on your shirt for holding reading glasses... maybe that would hold a steel mechanical pencil.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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If you need one, buy a cooking one. Cheaper and replacements are handy. Martin
On 11/25/2015 2:07 PM, dadiOH wrote:

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On 11/25/2015 3:07 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Aprons keep most of the sawdust off but they also hold the tools a cabinet maker needs with him all the time. Besides holding your pencil so you don't misplace it, I keep my safety glasses in one pocket, tape in another, small tri-square in another, Still have one left for my remote dust control when Santa comes, and my calculator and note pad in the larger chest pocket.
This Rockler apron is the first one I had that can do all that comfortably. This has cut my old age woodworking time by at least a factor of 3, because most of my shop time lately has been spent looking for each of those "misplaced items".
Now, first thing I do is put on my apron, and I can spend my time more usefully searching for other misplaced items I just laid down somewhere.
--
Jack
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On 11/26/2015 9:42 AM, Jack wrote:

box. ;~) And I actually have a tool around tool box for many of the items that you mentioned. It will roll under the right extension of my TS.

a blade width of material on the TS.
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On 11/26/2015 9:42 AM, Jack wrote:

Ditto ... always wear a Rockler Apron in the shop (have worn three out so far), less often on a job site.
My paternal grandfather gave me one when I was five years old and _helping_ him in his shop. Old habits are hard to break (used a fold up rule, just like him, until I was in my forties).
--
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On 11/26/2015 12:56 PM, Swingman wrote:

I've always worn an apron in my shop, but out side, doing carpentry work, I always used a tool belt that holds nails, hammers, and other stuff I rarely use in the shop.
This Rockler design is the best I've had, the pockets are just right, and it has the wide, over the shoulder cross back harness instead of the over the neck one that digs into your neck. This makes it much more comfy, but a bit harder to put on.
--
Jack
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On Thursday, November 26, 2015 at 11:56:50 AM UTC-6, Swingman wrote:

They are indeed hard to break. When I was finally allowed to use tools, I was advised to purchase a heavy duty canvas waist type apron. It held my t ape, a ton of nails, had a pencil slot, and room for my tri square. My ham mer was slipped in behind one of the ties, and then later, one of the guys showed me how to make a hanger from heavy wire.
Leather tool bags followed, and my "teacher" advised me that if I didn't ha ve my bags on (with tools at the ready) then I must be a laborer, so he wou ld make me sweep or carry wood. So I wore my bags ALL the time.
Now I have two sets of bags I wear. One for trim work to hold the necessar ies for that work, and another set for demo/framing/siding/cornice.
Never became one with a baker style apron, and have tried more than once. Creature of habit, I guess.
Robert
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On 11/28/2015 8:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Leather tool bags you wear are what carpenters, electricians and whatnot wear working on a construction site. Cabinetmakers working inside in a cabinet shop generally wear "baker style" aprons, designed specifically for the wood shop. I reckon some are cross-dressers, but it would be somewhat rare I'd think to see the roles reversed. Perhaps a carpenter building built-ins on site might wear a cabinet makers apron, particularly if that was his main job.
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Jack
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I buy 10/$1 .7mm or .9mm mechanical pencils and scatter so many around the house there is always at least one within sight. ;-)
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On 11/25/2015 1:37 PM, krw wrote:

That's what most everyone does I suspect. Standard pencils are hard to keep sharp, hard to keep a point on w/o breaking. I've only had the Rockler for a month or so and it is great. I've tried lots of different pencils, including mechanical ones, for the shop, and this is a winner I think. It feels really substantial in your hand, has cross hatching where your finger grips it. The lead is think and the point stays pointy longer than other pencils. That sort of stuff that makes it nice. I've read that the tip breaks easily if dropped, but it sure doesn't feel like it would.
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Jack
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On 11/26/2015 9:19 AM, Jack wrote:

I would probably switch out to one of my drafting pencils but my wood supplier gives me wooden pencils, these are actually great pencils that last a long time. Apparently there is such a demand for those free pencils that they now sell them. I have 37 unsharpened and have only used about 4 in the past 3~5 years. The leads don't break on these wooden pencils. ;~) IMHO if you can't sharpen a pencil you cant get a fine enough point for certain marks, .7mm is not fine enough for me much of the time.
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wrote:

Use an xacto knife.
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I consider a pencil sharpener an essential shop tool. They cost no more than $20, and I love the manual "school" style (Based on the Boston L) myself. I often use it when the pencil gets dull, just a quick little twist or 3 and the pencil's ready to use again.
That's also the lathe. I wonder if there's a pointy stick compendium somewhere on the Internet?
Puckdropper
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I have a 'monster' Blue school one in the workroom next to my office. In the shop I have a low cost plug in gear grinder, but it works.
Pencils started to change when plastic was introduced into the clay. The clay % determines the hardness and binds.
The big blue one sharpens the thumb size to normal pencil size.
Martin
On 11/26/2015 1:41 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

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On 11/26/2015 1:41 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I have an old electric Panasonic sharpener in the shop.
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Is the Panasonic a mechanical pencil sharpener ? wow.
I have a nice eraser motor drive system. Great in the shop.
Martin
On 11/27/2015 8:24 AM, Leon wrote:

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On 11/27/2015 9:35 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

No, standard electric.

I have an electric eraser from my drawing days. I keep a plastic eraser on hand for the shop.

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krw wrote:

The way to get a really fime point on a pencil, either mechanical or wood, is to do as old time negative retouchers did...
1. get about 1/2" or more of lead out
2. fold over a small piece of fine - #320, say - wet or dry paper
3. insert lead at fold, press down on paper at either side of the lead
4. move lead in and out of the paper, turning from time to time
A bit of a pain but you will wind up with a point like a needle. Fragile though :(
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Draftsmans' lead pointer works in a similar manner, only more convenient.
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As my dad grew teeth on these pencils, as did I - the clay that binds the graphite within ages. As it gets old, the pencils tend to crack the leads. Drop one and just maybe never get a point on it again.
Moisture - keeps them going. Not water, just 30-50%.
Martin
On 11/26/2015 10:01 AM, Leon wrote:

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