Beginners Syndrome

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wrote:

learns from his own mistake, and the fool never learns, because he doesn't make mistakes.
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On 11/20/15 8:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Wow! I've always heard the first two, but that third one really brings it home.
I'm stealing that.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote:

ago.
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wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca was heard to mutter:

A smart man makes a mistake, learns from it, and never makes that mistake again. But a wise man finds a smart man and learns from him how to avoid the mistake altogether. -Roy H. Williams
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wrote:

True that, too.
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On Fri, 20 Nov 2015 18:39:49 -0500

with this addition
when you learn to fix them so no one can even tell you have reached craftsman i have heard an expert is one that has no more mistakes left to make experts have made them all
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There are two positive aspects:
1) That's why we have trash cans.
2) Mistakes are part of the learning experience.
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On Sun, 22 Nov 2015 10:28:49 -0800 (PST)

i was thinking salvage it or the fireplace

mistakes are the learning experience
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Mistakes are only part of the learning experience. Success is a critical part of the experience as well. In fact, learning is a constant process of knowledge gathering, knowledge testing and feedback. These three stages are nicely separated for writing, but can happen at the same time or not at all or any combination thereof.
My biggest advantage in the shop is that I play dumb: I don't know I can't do something. I attempt it, and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 25 Nov 2015 03:32:49 GMT Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

they are a big part even if the mistakes are minor the fear of making them is the thing that i see happen to a lot of people they have high expectations they screw up they give up
the expectations should be reset and try it again
as you say it is continual process humor and sometimes swearing helps too
speaking of expectations i got a book of wood art and i want to make all of them
but my expectations are that i might make only one of them
there is a wooden mat that has caught my attention god help me my expectations are low on reproducing it exactly but i will be satisfied to have a usable facsimile
and it may only be placemat size
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On 11/19/15 10:19 PM, Bill wrote:

I think I still have a box full of woodworking books, from our move. Whenever I'd get a new tool (lathe!) I would get books and read up on techniques and safety, etc. There's a healthy amount to it, but yes, one can get immersed in reading and learning about it so much that they never end up doing it.
Reminds me of the tenured professors where I used to work. I called them "professional students," because many of them never had any actual, real world, work experience. They went from high school to college, to grad school, to being a doctoral candidate, to teaching and never did anything else in their lives. (Think: the professor from "Back To School" with Rodney Dangerfield.)
After a few decades of hands-on experience, I now often see a book or website giving "expert" advice on how to do something and it's often either wrong or very inefficient. I remember learning these "wrong" ways and also remember figuring out the *better ways* by simply doing it instead of reading about it.
Nothing wrong with learning by reading/watching. But learning by doing seems to be a much more fruitful and enjoyable endeavor.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 11/20/2015 12:26 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

What is scary is those people who have the advanced degrees and no practical experience think the world should run as it says in the book and the way academia thinks it should.
When they are forced into practical situations, they are not only useless, but can become dangerous to others when trying to make the practical world comply to the books and academia's ideas.
We have many examples of these people trying to run things in the US today.
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That might possibly be true for some social science professor. It is not even close to true for Engineering professors, most of whom do as well as teach.
In any case, blanket statement such as you've made regarding 'tenured professions' are nonsense, as all schools and all professors are not alike.
Getting your real-world knowledge form a comedy film doesn't help.
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On 11/20/15 12:22 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Oh lighten up. Did I touch a nerve? :-) It wasn't a blanket statement concerning all college professors. If you notice, I wrote "the tenured professors where I used to work" which is a pretty narrow focus. And even then any reasonable person could assume i was talking about some and not all.

That's called an illustration to help to help make a point. I got plenty of " real-world knowledge" from working in academia for 15 years which is solely what I based my opinion on.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 11/20/2015 1:22 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I happend to fly model airplanes (he was a team member) with a professor, who was a phd, a head of the engineering dept, and he had never worked in the private sector, only for the university. No I won't mention which Univ. He was good, smart, had to get grants to keep the program going. He did some neat stuff, but He never worked outside of the university. He's retired .. He had to have the best of everything, but did not put the time into practicing. He jumped from thing to thing, because he never mastered the skills required for any of the disciplines. He thought it was the equipment that would make it better. I cared less about the equip, and concentrated on flying, strategy, and learning the ropes.
I also worked with 2 professors in a finance company. They did work for the company. Their code sucked, and their designs sucked. They were not practical.
I also worked in the pharma research area (I'm IT) , where some of the phd's needed assistants to prevent them from getting lost, or for other basic reasons.
Yes it does happen. Some of the least educated can be the most practical, or self sufficient. But there are real smart guys who are also very down to earth. The problem is there are more that are not well grounded.
--
Jeff

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That's why I say formal education is not the path to true intelligence, merely one of the steps along the way.
I also believe that after a certain point, formal education holds you back.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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I learned more engineering in my first month at United Technologies than I did in four years at Georgia Tech.
Academia has long since gone off in its own direction that has little to do with life outside of academia.
You haven't seen a new hire with a computer science degree from a highly regarded university struggling to write a simple program.
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On 11/21/15 3:31 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

Either way, if you graduated from GT in engineering, you have my respect. Not exactly a basket weaving school.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 11/20/2015 11:26 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Just last night read a couple of articles from kitchen and bath magazines (featured on iPad's FlipBoard, so you know it casts a wide net) that purport to advise people on remodeling their kitchen and bath space, the different types of cabinetry, doors, etc.
Information is so false, off base and far from reality that it should be a criminal offense to have published it.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
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