Attaching the countertop

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Just a quick question. I've a pair of base cabinets that I'm building a countertop for. The countertop is around 5/8" thick wood. What's the normal procedure for attaching the counter top to the cabinet?
The cabinets will likely get moved around a few times, so I'd need something that can withstand that.
Puckdropper
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On Sep 7, 10:17 pm, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Do the cabinets have rails across the top?
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http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Insidebackdetail.jpg
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wrote:

They do, but are offset from the top about 3/4".
Puckdropper
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On 9/7/10 11:21 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Shims and screws through the rails.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Any way which will allow a little movement, including but not limited to:
Screws in slotted brackets Screws in bendy brackets Screws with washers under the heads through oversized holes Wooden blocks which hook into a slot in the cabinet Silicone sealant (not sure I would recommend that one but have seen it done)
You actually only need to allow movement on one edge so you can fix the other edge down hard it f you wish.
Tim W
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On 9/7/2010 9:17 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

The "normal procedure" is screws, up through stretchers fastened between the end panels for just that purpose. > > The cabinets will likely get moved around a few times, so I'd need > something that can withstand that.
With that thin of a counter top to screw into you, and in addition to strategically places screws as above, you will probably want to consider using multiple brackets attached to the interior sides of the case work if you can.
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I was wondering if I needed to run something across to add a bit more strength. I've got the space underneath for a couple brackets.
Thanks to everyone for the responses!
Puckdropper
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On 9/8/2010 2:51 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Pretty much the same thing Rob posted, which is "normal procedure" used to attach counter tops/substrate to base cabinets (they also add some often desirable rigidity to the casework if there is no substrate needed under the counter top material):
http://www.e-woodshop.net/files/BaseCabStretchers.pdf
Can be finish nailed in, with glue or not, or in some extreme cases and where the cabinet sides are visible, with pocket hole screws. Make them a bit narrower and you'll have more room for more brackets.
("stretchers" may just be a regional thing ...)
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A bit of overkill perhaps but attaching the countertop should be a cinch. http://picasaweb.google.com/contrarian32/EndCabinet #
Max
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On 9/9/10 1:56 PM, Max wrote:

Impressive corner joint on that plywood.
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Thanks. Biscuits and luck. :-)
Max
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On 9/9/10 5:45 PM, Max wrote:

I saw the biscuits comment in the other post. That certainly helps with alignment on corners... but everything else has to be done very accurately, too, especially the cut.
Like Tiger Woods said, "The more I practice, the luckier I get."
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Actually I screwed up the first attempt. I set the angle on the table saw using the scale on the saw. After wasting some good oak plywood I realized that I needed something to get a more precise angle. I bought one of these and it *works*. :-) http://tinyurl.com/33sv4tc
Max
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On 9/9/10 7:14 PM, Max wrote:

I have the iGauge one and love it.
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On Sep 7, 10:17 pm, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Since you're installing a 5/8" top instead of a more conventional 3/4" thickness be careful to select a screw length which will not pierce your top. It's the type of error you make one time only.
Joe G
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And when you're on your back inside a cabinet and you ask your helper to hand you a 1-1/4" screw....check it. If he hands you a 1-1/2" screw, you could have a problem.... or so I'm told. A pan head with the built-in washer is the way to go, imho.
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On 9/8/10 5:35 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Agreed. It's worth it to have these around, simply because they won't countersink themselves. You know without a doubt that a 1-1/4" pan head will only go that far into the material. With a bugle head, you slip and go too far... oops, there's the tip coming through the top of the counter.
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On 9/8/2010 6:40 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

That depends on what material you are screwing it into and what tool you're using to drive it. If I don't pay attention to what I'm doing my impact driver will happily sink a McFeelys #8 washer head screw a quarter inch deep in poplar.
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