ANYONE USE A TABLE SAW EXTENSION FOR ROUTER USE?

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I have two, a Bosch (discontinued) that works well and allows me to remove the router in moments (thus it's not in the road). I also milled the cast iron extension to allow a plexi dropin mount. I can take that out and put in a blanking plug. I would do either (or both) again. Both allows me to have two setups ready
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com says...

tablesaw. I've used it for several years and it works well for me. But I have a small shop and really didn't have room for a separate router table. Certainly not one with the table surface I have now.
I made a screw-on fence that attaches to the saws rip fence. But a lot of times I just clamp a straight board to the table or use a piloted bit. So the advantage of being able to use the rip fence isn't as great as some would have you believe.
On the whole I think it's definitely the way to go in a small shop.
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When I bought my Grizzly G0555 I got the 72 inch extension with legs. Best investment I ever made.
says...

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I am a mechanic by trade and often use a mill to make parts for machinery. I might get another wing extension and mill a recessed hole for my router. But then......I often do more than one woodworking project at a time and it is very possible that.........
Router mght be in the way, after being painstakingly adjusted, when I need the space for sawing.
Router mght be in the way, after being painstakingly adjusted, when I need the space for sawing.
Router mght be in the way, after being painstakingly adjusted, when I need the space for sawing.
Router mght be in the way, after being painstakingly adjusted, when I need the space for sawing.
Router mght be in the way, after being painstakingly adjusted, when I need the space for sawing.
Router mght be in the way, after being painstakingly adjusted, when I need the space for sawing.
There is much to think about....thanks again for giving me more insight!!
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Roger J.

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Let me throw in my 2 cents worth ....
I mounted a router in the wing of a Table saw years ago and to be honest it did work... but I made room in my shop for a dedicated router table after a few years... Main reason was that it was way too low to work comfortably with for any but the shortest sessions... you say it was a pain in the Back...
I still have a router mounted in it but very very rarely use it only because my regular table (bench dog) is set at a comfortable height plus is just so much more Flexible ..
In short I made the room... and I am very glad I did...
Bob Griffiths
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Roger,
I considered doing a table wing router saw too.
I ended up making a free standing unit. The big reason was because I realized that I could make it the same height as the table saw and thus use the router table as an infeed table when cutting big sheets of plywood on the tablesaw. It actually gets more use that way than as a router table.
Something to think about if you make a lot of rips on long pieces of wood or cut a lot of plywood.
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the right wing of my saw has several drop in sections just kind of floating loose. I swap them out for various configurations of router table type things on occasion, though most of my table router work is done on a stand alone router table. one of the operations I do on the saw wing most often is raising panels with a vertical panel raising bit, but with the router in the horizontal position. for that I made a qiuckie single purpose table to drop into the wing and haven't needed to modify it since.
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I built a router cabinet onto the left table extension of my saw. Works great. When it's not a router table the 2" thick oak top doubles as a small woodworking bench too.
bill otten

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Roger M. wrote:

Yes, you can obtain good results. Using the rip fence for the router works well for me. Also, I have a pretty long set of rails so I have made a 'jointer fence' that runs lengthways down the table for edge flattening with the router. I sometimes make a long channel, lengthwise on the tables to cut edge mouldings and put featherboards on it to hold the work against the long fence. With this setup I can safely climb cut the edge profile to eliminate tearout.
Another poster mentioned that the router can be in the way of the saw and I find that is true too sometimes.
I rigged up an outlet and control box with some relays to control my router/tablesaw with a footswitch, easily switch between saw and router (so I can use the magnetic contactor) and automatically turn on the vacuum on when I turn on either saw or router. (the resistive braking didn't work though ;( ) Overall, it functions pretty well.
If your saw rails didn't come with a table, just make one out of mdf and laminate. I used the one that came with my saw, but it is substandard. If you make one, consider making it sit on leveling feet or shims (on the rails) so you can adjust it to be perfectly flat with the tabletop. Otherwise, the rip fence may bind.
You can buy a router base plate for a few bucks, or buy a router lift.
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