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how's that different from applejack?
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Bridger asks:

Applejack is distilled from the hard cider.
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
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Or, better, concentrated by freezing and discarding the ice fraction.
Tastes better icy cold from the porch, too.

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Applejack is what you get when you put hard cider in the freezer, let the water freeze, and pour off the alcohol. Repeat for greater effect. Er, so I've heard.
Dave Hinz
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Grant P. Beagles responds:

I'm 66 and tried my first hard cider in Westchester County about 50 years ago, but my grandparents were from Kentucky and Virginia, and started their tasting probably close to 100 years before that.
Hard cider has probably been around since the second apple.
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

They had a hard cider in England (Wiltshire) in the 60s called Scrumpy. Word was that it couldn't be called Scrumpy unless a rat could walk across the scum floating at the top of the glass. Word also was that nobody could drink three pints (English pints) of the stuff and walk away - word was right.

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Lobby Dosser writes:

To have some real fun with hard cider, flash freeze a five gallon jug. Tap and pour off the part that doesn't freeze. Drink that.
Wear knee pads.
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Next door neighbor in Ohio used to keep it on the back porch all winter. Kept pouring it off and refreezing. Ouch!

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On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 01:26:44 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

You realize that freeze distillation is just as illegal as having a still in the back 40.
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Luigi Zanasi writes:

IIRC, there's a maximum limit on what a U.S. citizen can produce--had a newly arrived (relatively speaking) Italian immigrant landlord who used to make his own wine. 200 gallons a year, tax free. I had the basement apartment, and it was a real PITA getting through the crates of grapes stacked when wine-making time came. Hownell the feds think they'd stop anyone making their own brandy from that or other harder stuff, I dunno.
And how they'd track a person doing flash freezing in their 20 CF chest freezer, I also dunno. Should keep down problems with lead solder from car radiators causing poisoning, though.
But it doesn't matter to me. I quit drinking almost 20 years ago because my liver was growing faster than the rest of me.
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in

cider etc. for home consumption. The Federal Government doesn't allow distillation of alcohol for home consumption at all. I IIRC the making of apple jack or the like (freezing an alcoholic beverage to extract the alcohol) is also illegal. The 'Ice beers' are a little different. The beer is chilled and some of the ice crystals are removed resulting in a beer with a slighty higher alcohol content and some say more flavor. I don't agree with the flavor part because you have to some flavor or taste to the beer prior to chilling it. I know several closet distillers (one is a good friend of mine:)) that distill fruit brandies and the like for their own use. Their plum and berry brandies can be truly delicious. In my experience, If a closet distiller doesn't try to sell spirits, doesn't give newspaper interviews about his hobby and generally keeps his output limited to close friends and family, the ATF will not be breaking down his door.
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On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 00:58:38 GMT, Lobby Dosser

There's no scrumpy in Wiltshire. The locals (looking further to the South West) would lynch anyone who claimed that the pondwater served by those squaddie types in their poncey uniforms (real men wear smocks and mint sauce as aftershave) was anything remotely like cider, let alone scrumpy. If you want real scrumpy, go to Somerset (maybe Dorset or Herefordshire too). But Wiltshire is a beer county.
We don't use the term "cider" in the UK, at least not in the same way that Americans do. Our non-alcoholic stuff is called "apple juice" and all "cider" is fermented. If it's cloudy, strong and has tails and whiskers in it, it's generally regarded as "scrumpy". The _strong_ stuff is filtered these days and colourless - "white cider" or "trampagne". It fills the same evolutionary niche as Everclear does in the USA, but you can't use it to mix shellac. Calvados (distilled or freeze distilled) comes from Normandy - for tax reasons, the only English spirit for the last few centuries has been gin.
Outside the months of July and August, cider isn't drunk. Well, it is, but only by 15 year olds, tramps, and the incurably rustic. It's a criminal offence to drink cider in most urban areas. In the countryside though, it's often accepted as mitigating circumstances in cases of sheep molestation.
--
'Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu Evesham wagn'nagl fhtagn'

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They did have a good ordinary bitter. But we used to haul 5 gallon containers of scrumpy back to the base. There was a Wine/Scrumpy bar in town - Swindon - that sold nothing else. Always a 'cheap drunk'.

But not in the south.

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IIRC Terry Pratchett refers to it as "scrumble" being made of "mostly apples".
Nanny Ogg would be able to proovide the proper recipe. If She ain't available I recon one could ask JT...
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I had some in Devon a few years back (somewhere around Exmouth, I think).

That's the stuff! And warm too, which made it none too refreshing. The second pint was a Strongbow, and went down rather well on a hot day.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
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On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 08:13:06 -0600, "Grant P. Beagles"

Good thing it was a calm day, eh ?
That's a pretty ride.
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Who said it was calm!
GregP wrote:

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On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 14:16:06 -0600, "Grant P. Beagles"

You have a strong stomach, then !
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GregP wrote:

My wifes a cyder drinker, and her opinion of Canadian cider is its a weak copy of the real thing! Proper scrumpy is the READ DEAL!
Niel.
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Only one problem with Alex's arguement. When you go to the USA, you deal with American Customs. When you return to Canada, you deal with Canadian Customs, and vice versa.
Scale's for vehicle weight, are intended for the trucks and would not be accurate enough to demonstrate a ten or twenty pound, let alone fifty pound change. Scale's are designed for a particular weight load. Primarily used to determine if a vehicle is loaded over it's gross weight.
Besides, most of the Canadian Customs staff have already concluded you have filled up the gas tank, and they would think you were a moron if you didn't. US fuel taxes are a lot lower. CDN's routinely fill up. It's almost $20 CDN per tank difference in price.
When I was crossing into the states, the only thing they recorded was the license plate number and that was to track the frequency of how often you were crossing into the states and for what purpose. The greater the frequency, the greater the number of questions they asked you.
On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 02:33:16 GMT, "Frank Ketchum"

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