A new tool!

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"Leon" wrote in message

I find that extremely hard to believe. I have seen most all woodworking shows use a plunge router for this purpose but they seldom continue to do so. I would think that lifting a tool that is twice as heavy would be slower. I really don't see any advantage that would make the router faster. Can you explain where the time savings comes in?
No problem with router weight. I was able to stand over the work and lift the router with two hands. Not heavy at all. I had the 8' long plywood sides laid out on the work bench and was able to rout the holes down one edge, flip the sheet end to end and go down the back side. Using the self centering drill bit was a mess. It would clog up every couple of holes, and some the holes it cut were not perpendicular to the side of the sheet. Using the router corrected all problems. Maybe not the way I would do the job if I were drilling ten or twelve pin holes, but it worked very well with no fatigue for many hundreds of them.
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On 9/2/2014 11:11 AM, FTG wrote:

I'll take your word for it. My situation however is that my mating panels are not often positioned the same, meaning that the location of an outer panel where it meets the bottom of the cabinet is not the same as where an inner panel bottom is situated. I typically register from the bottom of the cabinet after assembly. My inner panels are dadoed into the cabinet bottom 1/4", so there is an offset to keep in mind. I like to make it fool proof so drilling after assembly takes all math out of the process. ;~)
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And there is the case where there are times that there is no tool and a jig is necessary. The face frames that Swingman and I build have dado's and groves to accept the cabinet panels. Every face frame has incomplete dados where they intersect. I came up with a jig for completing those dados quickly and accurately.
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Wouldn't the router be heavier and more awkward to lift between jig holes? But then, I'd also expect that the router would make cleaner pin holes.
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On 9/2/14, 8:26 AM, Leon wrote:

I have yet to find one of those shelf-pin bits with the spring mechanism and centering bushing that didn't clog and have to be fiddled with to unclog every few holes. I spend more time unclogging the bit than drilling holes, so a router would save time in that instance.
However, as you stated, using a router to drill a 1/4" hole is kind of like using a 16' extension ladder to reach the top of the fridge. Since I usually drill my shelf pin holes after assembly, the router would be the worst option. If I were drilling 1000 pin holes and had all the case sides lined up on benches with jigs clamped up, ready to go in a production scenario, then the router would be the way to go.
The time savings is all these situations always comes into play *after* any jigs are already set up and clamped up and ready for boring. The beauty of the Rockler/Woodcraft/Bench Dog shelf pin jigs is there is next to no set up required out of the box.
I can grab my Woodcraft pin jig from the toolbox drawer and take it to a bookcase without a tape measure or clamp or pencil and start drilling perfectly spaced holes. Jig in one hand, drill in the other and ready to go.
--

-MIKE-

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On 9/2/2014 9:15 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

There is that but I always used a fast speed so that the clogging was not an issue of consideration for me. Now with a smaller 5mm bit that might become more of an issue. I know that the smaller Vix bits that I use do clog more the smaller I go.

Perhaps the advantage is being able to leave the router running and not waiting for the bit to spin compared to using a corded drill with out a brake. The Rockler bit was a brad point so there was little issue with tear out and that bit worked for countless years, well 20+ with out having to replace or resharpen the bit. When drilling hundreds of holes my biggest issue is a short jig that has to be repositioned often, the weight of the machine that I am having to reposition with every hole and the spring resistance that I have to over come. The Kreg jig with its hardened steel guides and standard brad point bit was a big improvement over the spring loaded bit. The problem with the Kreg was 4~5 holes at a time before repositioning. I simply can't imagine myself picking up a router, repositioning, and pushing against plunge springs hundreds of times. And that only works if there are no obstacles.

Basically the same with the True position drill guide. You can use each 12 hole plate alone or paired with the guide. With the guide you slip the plates on the guide until they stop and tighten 2 thumb screws on each side and you are ready to go for 24 holes.
Jeez I remember doing them with a drill press way back when. LOL
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On 9/2/14, 11:21 AM, Leon wrote:

Me, too! That lasted about 15 minutes and I was like, "screw this!"
--

-MIKE-

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On 9/2/2014 5:21 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I was too new into woodworking, 35+ years ago to realize that there might be a jig....and there may not have been. LOL
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