7" blade on 10" saw?

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You've gotten lots of good feedback already. But out of curiosity, what table saw does your friend own? And does he use a 7" blade on his?
Darrell
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I believe he has a Rockwell. He has a garage full of equipment, although his health is getting to be poor, and he doesn't do a lot any more. He has been doing woodworking for about fifty years now.
He has all sorts of saws and equipment, all quality tools.
I appreciate all the input, even from those who can't answer a simple question without flying off into the ozone.
I like to ask questions to learn. Sometimes one might ask what seems a dumb question, but I think there are no dumb questions except for those that someone has asked before and ignored the answer.
It always amazes me that those of us who don't know everything bother those who DO know everything so much. I think when one quits learning and changing, they die. Or at least in the literal sense. I hope I continue to learn something every day, and maybe even by asking dumb questions.
Steve
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Puff
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"Tom Veatch" <.> wrote in message

This is so true.
Al
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"Tom Veatch" <.> wrote in message said:

Yah got that right. In the real world, a stupid question might bring a giggle, a hearty guffaw, rolling eyes expression, some subtle gesture that it may have been a dumb thing to ask. Yet, to me, it all falls back on the teacher. We start off knowing little. We learn by asking. If we get slapped, the first thing we learn is not to ask, or not to ask THAT person. As I have progressed through careers, hobbies, and life experiences, the teachers I remember the most were the patient ones who didn't kick me in the nuts all the time. They were also the ones I learned the most from. And lastly, they were the ones I had the biggest laughs from when we would recap and say,
"Hey, do you remember the time when I (fill in your favorite story)"?
Know it all teachers and know it all students. They both have a way of reaching their own ultimate levels of competency.
Steve
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Does the 10" blade really "bog down" the motor? If it does when cutting 4/4 or 5/4 hardwood or 2X soft wood, then something is wrong with it or it is truly underpowered. I have a contractor saw with 1.5HP induction motor and leave a 10" blade on it more than 90% of the time. The rest of the time it's either using an 8" dadao stack or occasionally a molding head. I have very rarely used a smaller blade for some special purpose but there is no need to use a 7 1/4" as your standard blade.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

There are truly underpowered saws out there. My old Rockwell was 3/4HP from the factory. It could take a 9" blade, but going smaller was even easier on the motor.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

rockwell almost certainly offered that saw with a variety of motors, or without a motor. the choice to set it up underpowered was made by the purchaser, if my understanding of the early rockwell marketing is correct. even so, it's kind of hard to justify selling a 9" saw with a 3/4HP motor on it if it was meant for sheet goods, or for any kind of heavy ripping. how big is the table, and is it tilting arbor or tilting table?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It was a tilting arbor saw, single cast-iron wing. Similar to this one:
http://www.owwm.com/PhotoIndex/detail.asp?idA89
Chris
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Steve B wrote:

If it doesn't seem to be bogging down I wouldn't worry about it. If it does seem to be, make sure it's getting enough power--that means plugged directly into the wall rather than on an extension cord and with a reasonably short run back to the breaker panel and no other loads on the circuit.
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2006 10:15:50 -0400, "J. Clarke"

or possibly a very tight belt.. DAMHIKT
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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STEVE REMEMBER THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A DUMB QUESTION.
I SAW A DEMO. ABOUT SAW BLADES. IN EXTERME SLOW MOTION. THE 10" BLADE ACTUALLY APPEARED TO "BACK UP" WITH THE INITIAL CONTACT WITH WOOD ESPECIALLY HARD WOOD. THE INTITAL CUT SHOWED CHATTER. THE FILM ALSO SHOWED 9", 8" AND 7" BLADES THE PROBLES WERE REDUCED AS THE DIAMETER REDUCED.
DO NOT BUY "A" NEW BLADE BUY SEVERL "QUALITY " BLADES.
WE ALL GET LAZY FROM TIME TO TIME AND DO NOT CHANGE THE BLADE FOR THE JOB WE ARE DOING, AND LATER COMPLAIN A BOUT THE QUALITY OF THE CUT THE BLADE WAS DOING ITS JOB, WE FAILED TO DO OURS.
GOOD LUCK WOODWORM

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I admit to leaving the same blade on my saw most of the time but at least I'm not so "lazy" that I won't use the caps lock & shift keys
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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TURN YOUR HEARING AID ON. And remember - WE are not deaf. :-)
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I wouldn't say that a 10" would burn up your saw faster but the smaller blades can be useful. Freud makes a 7 1/4" Diablo Finish Blade D0740X which is very useful when cutting small pieces of wood say for the inside of a desk gallery. I use them when cutting veneer for stringing and making banding. The D0740X has a .59 kerf which save a fair amount per cut which is important when you have some time invested to make the banding block. The blade also leaves a **very** fine cut. You have to make a zero clearance insert to use this type of blade with small material and there are a number of other little trick you can perform to help in cutting small material.
Having said all this the most used blade would be a 10" and of course this blade would be necessary when cutting thicker stock but once you try the smaller blades you may find yourself using them more often then you would have imagined.
On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 07:39:05 -0700, "Steve B"

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