5" ROS choices?

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On 2/4/11 11:36 AM, Leon wrote:

I wonder if anyone has ever tried the technique of putting an ever so slight bevel on the sides of face frames (think: door) so the butted edges would be tight even if a wave in the wall caused a slight convex line on any two cabinet fronts.
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That might work if the floor is perfectly flat but what if the floor dips or swells also? And or the wall or floor surfaces may be flat and even at one point of contact with the cab but not at other spots. IMHO it is simply easier and faster to finish sand after the install.
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On 2/4/11 1:56 PM, Leon wrote:

I wasn't implying that it be done in place of those things. I'm thining of the case where there is solid contact on the back of the stile but not the front. There would be a gap in the front. In any case, I'm guessing guys shim that out so everything is flush.
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On 2/4/2011 3:04 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Actually, the process seems to have gotten a bit confused.
The general procedure is to join cabinets, face frame to face frame, on a level surface, before they are installed/attached to the wall.
Obviously you can't do that in cases where run is too long, but it is generally advantageous to do this.
That notwithstanding, the problem can be easily demonstrated by butting two boards of the same thickness side by side on a level surface ... no matter how much you try, you can almost always tell the join beteen the two surfaces just by running you finger across it, even there is only 1/128" difference.
That is the kind of thing you try to rectify by finish sanding after installation ... if your error is any larger than just a small difference, you would have done better by rejoining the cabinets before you put them up.
IOW, it's a very small thing, not a gross adjustment, that you want to sand out ... more of an aesthetic thing.
But you're right (if I understand your intent correctly), a "v" groove along the join can certainly hide those kind of irregularities, and is a legitimate device to do so ... problem is that you need to carry it throughout the installation as a "design feature" in order for it to be effective because it certainly changes the look and feel.
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On 2/4/11 3:21 PM, Swingman wrote:
I always thought it would end up looking better to hand it all as one piece. Hope you have helpers. :-)

I don't have a way with words, so this is what I'm talking about... exaggerated, of course.
<https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/X_-QpY8vxRa1wKSSKBlFCA?
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On 2/4/2011 3:47 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Now I got you. AAMOF, I do that very thing (undercut) when scribing a FF to wall, when necessary.
That said, in all the cabinetry I've done down through the years I can't recall a single situation where it was remotely necessary when screwing two adjoining FF's together.
That's not to say it won't happen on the next job.
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On Wed, 2 Feb 2011 10:22:52 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

EEK! 40 hours per week _sanding_? Even with a festerl, that would be hell.
-- Woe be to him that reads but one book. -- George Herbert
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But I get a day off...
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-MIKE- wrote:

OK, thanks, I'll take a look...as I replied to Swingman, the primary application doesn't lend to dust collection but the numb-hand syndrome avoidance is good as the use time is extensive when get going--can spend days at a time doing nothing but prep work. Given the barn is 66x38 and is 40-ft to the ridge, there's a lot of siding...
We got paint on a fair amount of it earlier, but unfortunately despite all the effort we did put in, there are places that show it still isn't sticking so besides the end that wasn't gotten to there are quite sizable amounts that will have to be attacked again. Discouraging considering both the time and money...the paint bill alone was $8k...especially when it looked so good while doing it--used wash, sanded, and oxalic acid that left the old (ca 1918) yellow pine looking as bright as new. But, as much time and effort as was, it was impossible to get every inch and some areas just weren't _quite_ good enough. :(
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Newbe question Mike. Would you use that sander for the last treatment on a piece you were going to stain and/or varnish? Obviously I don't have one.
Bill
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On 2/2/11 2:23 PM, Bill wrote:

I'm no expert on finishing, but if you're talking about the final sanding of bare wood, yes. I wish I had this on my last project I stained (dyed).
I would not use any power sander for sanding in-between coats or in between stain & topcoat, however. There may be guys who have enough finesse to do that without sanding though the stain or topcoat layer, but I'm not one of them.
As I posted a few months ago, I discovered that hand rubbing with brown paper bag works great for that.
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-MIKE- wrote:

Thank you very much!
Bill
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On 2/2/11 2:47 PM, Bill wrote:

Just don't blame me. :-)
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You ruled out the one worth having..... ;~)
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Bosch. But only has 8 hole pads..., so, maybe ...
I don't see why you couldn't take any vendor's pad and adapt it to a new sander by drilling holes through the rubber pad to match the sander.
Or for that matter I think you could take an 8-hole pad and add or modify holes to make it work with 5 and 8 hole paper. I have some 3M sandpaper with elongated holes so it will work with 5 or 8 hole pads, that would make a nice template.
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Jim Weisgram wrote: ...

There's a possibility perhaps, yes. I've not tried actually modifying one; not sure about whether there's any structure around the mounting holes specifically or not. That would be about my only concern other than just the hassle of doing so...

PC has introduced pads for theirs that have slots to adapt for either I see in some looking at options yesterday...If go that route I'll undoubtedly by those at same time.
Thanks for the rec on Bosch...
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dpb wrote:

...
OK, thanks for the input...
After having done some more looking, I've determined I can still get all the parts need to rebuild 3 of the old ones for about the price of slightly under the price of a new PC or that ilk. So, yesterday evening I ordered the stuff other than the bearings I can get locally and started teardown assembly line in waiting...
The anti-rotation ring on the dust shroud/collector on these when used so hard/long gradually wears through the case and gets annoyingly loose as a result. I ordered two sets of rings and found somebody actually had a lot of 3 cases (NOS) on eBay so I've go them coming, too, as well as one armature and a few other odds'n'ends. Meanwhile, I'm looking into a couple of modifications of these cases and shrouds by fitting a piece of metal strap in lieu of the plastic wing. That'll have more surface area instead of the more or less sharp edge of the thin plastic piece. There's a cavity in the outer case where the wear occurs that looks like it could be filled in as well.
Three working old ones plus the two newer replacements on hand _should_ get through the coming spring flurry at which I'm hoping I'll get the rest of the prep done and paint on before really hot weather (in between spring planting and well before wheat harvest, of course).
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