5" ROS choices?

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On 2/2/2011 5:40 PM, Robatoy wrote:

I'm sure it is, especially for big wide jobs like countertops.
After using the Rotex 125 for drawer parts and face frames, which is about 90% of its work, the Rotex 125 has turned out to be an excellent choice ... I'm not second guessing my decision in the least.
Here's my sanding setup for cabinet parts:
https://picasaweb.google.com/karlcaillouet/FestoolStuff?authkey=Gv1sRgCL7kz_2FisWTfg#5569251562018543410
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I strongly considered the 150 but knew that large wide spaces were not going to be my main area of sanding. Even the Festool rep was suggesting the 150 over the 125 until I made him understand that face frames and cabinet doors and drawers were going to be the larger projects. He then totally agreed that the 150 would be more difficult to handle/balance on the narrow parts. If I was doing counter tops all the time I would have gone with the 150. I too have never given it a second thought my decision to go with the 125 over the 150. Actually I often see instances where the 150 would not have gone where the 125 could go.
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I totally agree. One should have both. <G> If I had to have only one, it'd be the 5" This one would be cumbersome when sanding faceframes:
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Sander.jpg
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On 2/3/2011 11:21 AM, Robatoy wrote:

That's not a sander, that's a farkn' hoovercraft.
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Looks like it's designed for removing manhole covers.
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"Robatoy" wrote:

http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Sander.jpg
--------------------------------- Just not big enough.
Run face frames thru the drum sander and not only get a better job but also save time.
Lew
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On 2/3/2011 3:03 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Good trick if you could do it ... final face frame sanding on a cabinet run is generally done after installation.
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In any case, cross grain sanding marks tend to make things look bad.
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CW wrote:

But you'll see 'em on many commercial boxes... :(
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I wrote:

------------------------------------- "Swingman" wrote:

---------------------------- Last trip I made to the drum sanding shop, had to wait for the guy to finish a load of face frames that were being installed the next day.
Evidently finish sand was good enough for that job.
Lew
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On 2/3/2011 4:13 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

So's a Big Mac ... if I couldn't do better than fast fast food quality work, I'd not do it in the first place. :)
Most rely on the painter to finish sand an installation. I do not. We always do our own finish sanding on our work, from drawers to the entire install.
Simply put, we owe it to the painstaking effort we put into the project before ever getting to that point.
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"Swingman" wrote:

---------------------------- McDonalds can take care of themselves, but from what I've seen of the fast food industry by and large they do a pretty decent job of maintaining quality control.
Given linen and silver service not provided.
Lew
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Is there a such thing as "quality" in the fast food industry? I think about all the preservitives used to make the food taste the same each time you go in... and then I try not to think about what my son's friends that have worked in that industry have told me about what you don't want to know. They are kids and don't eat where they work. Apparently it is like sausage, it all tastes good until you find out or watch it being made. I will agree that the fast food industry has a consistant standard but I would not really consider it a quality standard.
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Notice Lew stated "quality control" not "quality levels"
They do the first well, the latter poorly as you stated.
McDonalds can take care of themselves, but from what I've seen of the fast food industry by and large they do a pretty decent job of maintaining quality control.
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I did notice what hes said, quality control. There is no quality to control. I would call it a standard control.
;~) If every hamburger you bought from a specific store had sand in it and every time had the exact same of sand in it would you say they have a good quality control? IMHO Quality Control does have a minimum standard that is implied.
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...and they control the quality to make sure they never rise above that implied standard...<G>
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Leon wrote:

If the corporate and/or store specification stated that was the proper amount of sand, yes, that would be good quality control.
The target specification and subsequent control to the specification are two separate pieces. QC by itself simply is to maintain a specific tolerance to a a target (whatever that target value may be).
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Well let's say that the sand was not intended however they could not remidy the situation and the consumer is stuck with it and accepts it.
Or lets say the hamburgers sit on the shelf and drys out until the next rush of customers but a trip to the steamer to reintroduce moisture and heat to the burger is a standard procedure. Is that "quality" control even though the burger is not as fresh as the ones currently being assembled and immediately sold but no one can tell the difference in taste?
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Leon wrote:

As stated, if it isn't in the specification (or more rigorously, if the specification says it isn't supposed to be there), that's a failure.

That's outside of QC purview as to whether the end user accepts it or not. Proper implementation of QC would, however, prevent non-compliant product from entering the product chain (in rigorous compliance, to the exclusion of having any product, yes).

...
Of course, if it is, as I believe you're postulating, part of a process.
Again, you're confusing/confounding the _level_ of the quality standard w/ the process of QC to a standard.
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I understand the concept "QC" however I believe that expectations have been watered down so much that the term Quality Control no longer means what it was probably was intended to be. QC now days is to maintain a certain standard. Many years back it was to insure perfection as much as that was possible. Several years back when I was in the automotive business I ran a service department for an Oldsmobile dealership. We had a QC for all vehicles that were serviced or repaired in our shop. Every car was inspected to insure that everything was done correctly and 100% of the vehicles were expected to pass. Now by todays watered down expectation of the QC term perhaps 75% of the vehicles would be expected to pass QC and that might be an acceptable failure rate. Basically QC no longer stands for quality as it once did.
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