!/2" vs 3/4" Band saw blade

I have a Grizzly 14" bandsaw with the riser block. I purchased a TimberWolf 3/4" wide bs blade for resawing. It seems most of the people on this group talk about 1/2" width for resawing? Did I make a booboo? Do I need a 1/2" wide blade instead?
Thanks Ron
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Conventional wisdom is that most modern 14" band saws are not beefy enough to properly tension a 3/4" blade. However, the TimberWolf is supposedly a "low tension" blade, so you still may be within the limits of the saws capability.
Performance is basically what matters ... IOW, if it works for you, and does what you want it to do, don't fret about it.
Both Lonnie Bird and Mark Duginske have excellent books out on the bandsaw that will give you all the info needed on blades, operation, setup and use.
--
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Most people feel that the 3/4" blade is too stiff for the little motor on most 14" saws. I use a 1/2". Call Suffolk and ask them. They are the real experts here. They'll be more than glad to tell you what you need but I suspect they will also recomend a 1/2" balde, 3 teeth per inch.
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I split the difference. I use a 5/8 blade - Olsen Allpro - but I don't use it for thicker than 5 1/2". It does a pretty good job. I haven't got any Timberwolfs yet. I'm waiting for the riser before investing in lots of blades.
dave
Ron Stitt wrote:

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Ron Stitt wrote:

I have the Grizzly G1019 bandsaw with a 3/4 HP motor. I've tried both the 3/4" and the 1/2" 3 tpi Timberwolf blades. My 3/4 HP motor is a bit under powered for resawing and I find the 1/2" works better for me as there is less blade drag. The 1/2" blade also offers a little more clearance from the blade guard.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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I suppose "underpowered" depends on what you're resawing! I've got a 1960's vintage 12" Sears with 1/3 HP motor. I've managed (with extreme patience) to resaw 6" wide oak. I use a 3 tpi 1/2" Timberwolf blade.
This morning I was making some veneer from 3" wide walnut, and it did just fine. I kept skootching the fence closer and closer to the blade on each pass to see how thin I could get. The last slice measured 0.025 (25 thou) by dial caliper.
I wouldn't want to be in a production environment with a setup like this, but it's amazing what an old machine with a good blade can do if you're not in a hurry.
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Ron Stitt asks:

I find that a lot of 14" bandsaws won't easily tension 3/4" blades. I recently did some resawing with a 1/4" blade, and usually use a 1/2" or 5/8".
Use your 3/4" blade and don't worry about it, though.
Charlie Self "Character is much easier kept than recovered." Thomas Paine
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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recently
I am seriously considering a Laguna LT14 or LT16, is it the case with the LT14 too?
Thanks
--
Mike



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I have the jet 14" with riser and Suffolk recommended a 3/4". I use it a lot and it hasn't been an issue yet. Now, I don't try and feed at a fast rate but it certainly works fast enough for me. red oak, birch, butternut and my favorite.. wormy maple.
BRuce
Ron Stitt wrote:

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---

BRuce

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Ron,
I recently ordered blades from Suffolk Machinery for my 1HP/14" Jet with riser block. They said the 3/4 inch blade would be OK for re-sawing. I also have an aftermarket tensioning spring, Carter Cobra Coil, that I got at Woodcraft.
I have re-sawn 4/4 8 inch white oak with no drift using the 3/4 inch 3 tpi. Makes me happy. I also use a 1/2 inch 10 tpi blade for general ripping and a 3/8 10tpi blade for cutting curves. I'm very pleased with the 3 Suffolk Machinery blades that were recommended to me by their support folks (about 55 bucks incl. shipping). I also like my Jet very much and am glad I purchased it. My only complaint about the Jet was a little bit of vibration, and that disappeared when I changed the stock belt to a nylon link belt.
I would strongly recommend the aftermarket bandsaw improvements. Along with the Timberwolf blades, they can make a decent saw into a very good saw.
Regards,
Kevin B

TimberWolf
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yes, I also have the aftermarket spring and the detensioner (lot easier than remembering to crank it out 10 turns every night.
BRuce
Kevin B wrote:

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BRuce

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I bought a 3/4" timberwolf 4 tpi for resawing. I however, have an older Ryobi resaw intended bandsaw, BS-50N. The motor is sub 2000 watts and I can hear it slow a bit under load. Currently resawing 6" think purpleheart with neary a problem. I have a small amount of blade lead on the fence which I just clamp to the table. Mainly the pieces have only been a 1' or so long, but I could handle a 3' foot piece pretty easy in under minutes. I've not yet tried to make thin veneers and a drum sander would be handy for leveling those out.
Alan
http://alan.firebin.net/bs50n.html
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