10" Saw Blades

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wrote:

I use a Leitz 50t ATB & R for my normal table saw blade; replace with a Leitz 60T ATB if I'm doing a lot of cross cutting, miter cutting, or working with composites. These both do a great job, however, it was not a purchase decision, it was because they were Delta OEM and I had low cost access to great, German made, blades.
I use a Forrest chopmaster which is an 80T TC & F with a negative hook angle on my radial arm saw. Another great blade. Negative hook important for control, particularly on a RAS.
I have a number of others being involved with the blade testing during the transition of Delta OEM from Leitz to Oldham after Delta purchased Oldham. These others, mostly test prototypes are branded Delta, but would probably be the equivilent of Oldham Signature series. I like them, and know from the testing they are good blades. This information approximatley three years old, today, who knows.
There are many very good blades, and I suppose there are some junk blades, however, other than some of the throw away stamped steel blades used to satisfy UL (saw has to be sold with a blade, but we sure don't know what you want...), I'm not too familiar with them.
Frank
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote in message

Interesting ... That probably explains the Delta branded blade that came with my Unisaw a few years back that is one of the best blades I've ever used.
Although I keep a Forrest on, if I have to ship both back for re-sharpening which ocassionally happens, it is the first blade I grab.
I've said many times that it was an excellent blade, something you wouldn't expect as OEM.
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Several years ago Jet saws came equipped with Systematic blades. A Systematic blade was my first good blade I ever had.
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Yep, more than likely a Leitz. Great balance, radial and axial runnout tolerances, nice clean body polish and laser engraving rather than silk screen labeling. Cuts like a dream.
I would have preferred to not buy Oldham and stay with Leitz. It was not a Delta management decision, but a Pentair tool group decision. Oldham pretty good, but Leitz slightly better IMHO.
Don't know what Oldham has become with the sale to B & D. They had their own blade sources, and I think they shut down Oldham's North Carolina facility.
Frank
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The one that came on my saw is equal to a $10 Craftsman blade I use for rough cutting questionable wood. Can't tell them apart. Either you got lucky or I got a reject.
For serious work, I use a Ridge Carbide 40T and I have a couple of Freud Diablo 80T that have done more than they were designed for.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

Like I said, I've always been a bit puzzled when folks bitched about the Delta blades that came on the Unisaw, but it looks like Frank has cleared up the mystery ... not my usual "luck", BTW.
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Not a matter of luck or a reject. Depended on the model. Most special edition Unisaws over the last twelve years had the Leitz or, more recently, the Oldham blades. That was most of the saws sold. IMHO, the special editions were usually a pretty good deal.
The factory could not substitute blades, had to supply what was on the BOM for the particular model. Sweat it out many times waiting for those Leitz blades to come in so the line could run.
Frank
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nothing. circular saw blades are measured in teeth per blade. how many teeth you can run on a blade is largely a function of how much horsepower your saw has. the shape of those teeth is largely a function of what you are cutting.

what is the best flavor of ice cream?

blades with too many teeth for your saw motor, blades with the wrong tooth configuration for your material, blades with the wrong service life for your business model.
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