Which SDS?

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Just received my Screwfix bumph through the post and see they have various SDS drills on offer. Which do you think is best value for money?
Looking to buy something for general DIY where my normal drill can't cope!
Bosch GBH2-20SRE (500W) 90 Bosch GBH2-24DSR (620W) 140 Dewalt DW566K (650W) 135
Colin
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Buy the cheapest - they will all do exactly the same thing and last as long as each other for your purpose.
dg

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wrote:

I think the cheaper Bosch one does not have rotary stop, so it can't be used as a chisel alone. The other Bosch one may not have either, but I am pretty sure the Dewalt one does.
-- Colin Swan
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Colin Swan wrote:

The DW does, and it's extremely good value. Very good tool.
--
Grunff


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dg wrote:

The cheap one doesn't list a rotory stop on the screwfix web site, and that's something you're likely to want.
-Duncan
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I have had a sds drill for years (B&D Proline) which has been used professionally, for DIY, and lent out countless times. Now this does not have a rotary stop and has never needed one.
How many times to you actually need a rotary stop for DIY?
People buy an sds for drillling and not on the basis of chipping a few tiles of the wall once every five years. It is not worth an extra 45.
Spend 90 on the drill, 1.50 on a cold and bolster chisel and 3.99 on a lump hammer. Sorted
dg
"Duncan Lees" <duncan-at-snsys-dot-com> wrote in message

long
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tiles
You are joking aren't you? I use mine with rotary stop engaged about 90% of the time. Most of the rest is core drilling. The only other masonry work I generally do is drilling for rawlplugs, when I use a standard hammer drill as it is quick and simple. Most of the time my hammer drill has a 7mm masonry bit, the SDS has a cold chisel and my battery drill has a cross point screwdriver head. I rarely need to change bits and I can sink sockets, chase cables and screw the back boxes to the wall with no bit changes.

It took me over an hour to chase a couple of channels for my speaker cable before SDS was invented, using a cold chisel and hammer. Since then, I could do the same job in less than five minutes.
Christian.
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For DIY?
I can't imagine the OP using his drill for chiselling 90% of the time. He wants it to drill holes - and infrequently at that. I don't think he would have to drill many core holes either. The point is you don't need a mechanical chisel for DIY work. You may want one for an odd occasion, but you don't need one.
I would not have used a power tool to chisel a massive channel for speaker cable - I would have gouged a fine recess by scraping the tip of a chisel along the wall. Less mess, less making good.
dg

of
sockets,
could
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Yes. Maybe your idea of DIY is different to mine. However, mine involves running lots of pipework and cables. Whilst drilling holes for rawlplugs is a fairly frequent need, it is unlikely to trouble any hammer drill and wouldn't in itself persuade me to buy an SDS. For me, SDS means easy chiselling and core drilling (i.e. for bath/sink wastes, or extractor outlets). I suppose if you have no plumbing or electricals to do, the chiselling aspect won't be so important.

You obviously haven't seen my speaker cable.
Christian.
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Do you mean your not using bell wire? lol
dg

SNIP
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No. Don't get me wrong. I'm not one of those buying 200 quid interconnects and enthusing over the subtle hint of honeysuckle and shades of camomile. However, having thick speaker cables does reduce voltage drop and has some effect on frequency response. If burying, I tend to use something reasonable like 105 strand OFC, which is cheap as chips. It may not be chunky, but it does need more than a scratch in the plaster to bury, though.
Christian.
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Once you know what power tools can do, you use them. Relative of mine would never have tackled some DIY job if cheap power tools were not available.
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DIY can mean many things, for me it means rewiring my house, replumbing etc. not just the infrequent hole. And this goes for plenty of us here.
And anyway even if the intentions is not to sue the chiselling function much -it's be a shame not to spend the bit extra for a useful function.
I bought mine after getting fed up slogging away with my walls cutting holes for backboxes and channelling out the brickwork.
After I had used the SDs to do the first one in a few minutes with ease it had already been worthwile.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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But it will be a 50% (45) increase for the drill with roto stop, and what I am saying is that while it may be useful, is it really worth the extra cost for DIY ?
You could go on forever paying a bit more for the next model up with the extra features. Sure, you may use the features for a, but do you need them - you have to draw the line somewhere.
Given x amount of money to spend, do you buy a drill and roto stop to use the stop feature once, or do you buy a plain vanilla drill and planer, sander, cordless etc and use all the tools more often?
I would advocate only buying what you need, not what you might need. With DIY there are very few tools you actually need, but a far greater number you may need may want, or which you thought you may need and use rarely
If you want to do any channeling and box sinking then a drill is a crude tool. Far better would be a proper box sinker attatchment or an attachment for an angle grinder. Both would be quicker, have less disturbance to the walls and with dust extraction, much more tidier than having bits of block and dust fly all over the place.
The attachments would not cost any more than a good drill with the roto stop, and be much more cost and time effective.
If you think you will need to do some channeling or box sinking for a one-off large project at home, or for more regular jobs, then you would buy the best tool for doing this, or hire it for one-off. Yes you could use a roto stop drill, but it is not the best tool to use, and certainly not the tool to buy on a might use basis.
dg
writes

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IMO, Yes.
In the three months since I acquired my SDS I have used it for the following tasks:
With Rotostop engaged: Demolishing a concrete block wall; Removing a roomful of tiles; Chiselling a window rebate to make the sill fit; Chasing walls for shower plumbing; Chopping walls to make bath fit; Modifying hole around a waste pipe to adjust its position.
Total: several hours work. Would have been several months with hammer and bolster.
Without Rotostop: Drilling three holes.
Total: several seconds work
I generally use my trusty hammer drill for plain old drilling. The SDS causes too much havoc and destruction 8^) And I haven't got such a wide range of bit sizes.
I'm just a "normal" DIY-er, honest! No kind of professional at all.
Ben
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I would buy one with a compulsory fixed roto stop that can't be turned off, but not one without a roto stop at all. Obviously, having the choice is much better! I consider an SDS drill to be primarily a powered chisel, with the added benefit of taking chunky drill bits, like core drills.
I prefer the flying chunks of the chisel to the quite spectacular dust storms of an angle grinder.
Christian.
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dg wrote:

IMO Yes, also if he bought the Makita it would only be a 30 increase.

You are correct - you can keep adding features that you will never use. However look at the OPs first post - he specifically stated he wanted an SDS for the cases where "general DIY where my normal drill can't cope!" - I would have to include chiselling under the list of jobs that a normal hammer drill would not cope with! "general DIY" also suggests a broad range of tasks for which the more flexible tool might be better suited.

Well if the OP has wall like ours then there are times when even drilling a 5mm hole 15mm deep *requires* the SDS!

I would suggest buying a tool with a sensible set of features. With an SDS I would suggest having the roto stop is a sensible feature to have especially as it does not cost that much more.
There is also the argument that you can get satisfaction from using a good tool which is smooth, powerful, gets the job done without too much vibration and operator fatigue, and then lasts for years.

Most of the box sinker attachments require roto stop.

You would need some *serious" dust extraction to make using an angle grinder for chasing walls indoors a sensible proposition!

For things like box sinking I think you will find the drill with a chisel is actually a pretty effective tool.
--
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John.

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On Fri, 26 Sep 2003 10:40:53 +0100, dg wrote:

Erm, box sinkers require rotary stop...

Angle grinders throw vast amounts of dust all over the place.

I'll grant you that *good* (aka *very* good) dust extraction on an angle grinder may reduce the mess but that is yet another extra for suitable vacum device hoses etc.

Box sinkers are not cheap. Screwfix single box set is 84.99, the single and double box set with 30mm channelling chisel, 5 x 6mm drills, circular cutter and SDS bolster type chisel is 189.99. The dust extraction unit 69.99 (Yes, 69.99, that is what Volume 72 has it listed as, for a polypropylene moulding, typo for 6.99?)

I agree a box sinker is the best tool for sinking boxes but they ain't cheap (see above) and you *still* require the roto-stop drill. For just a few boxes a plain chisel is far cheaper. And, in my case, saves a minimum 50 mile round trip to the nearest hire shop.
Channelling I just cut through the plaster along each edge of the channel then zipped up the middle only minor break out from the skim and cutting at of 6' in a matter of minutes. Plaster in large lumps not pulversised to dust that a channel cutter would produce.
--
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Only if he buys from Screwfix.
Sensible thing would be to buy the Bosch *with* rotostop from Argos for 95.
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Looks like I'm on a hiding to nothing on this one. Rotostop it is then
(even if you never use it!)
dg
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