Wet Floor

Had a leak round the back of the washing machine which turened out to merely need a spanner applied to the connections...
Upon further investigation though it seems the floor under the washing machine is wet, well damp. Visible moisture on the underside of the lino and the concrete is discoloured, as it is a cm or so up the wall.
Rest of floor seems fine, so question is, is this likely to be a disasterous problem, or could it be that a period of drying out would solve my floor woes?
I can take photos if its likely to help....
Thanks
Dave
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knocked together my bathroom/bog left a compression fitteing isolating valve to the toilet firmly boxed in and tiled over.
Of course in (much) later work I disturbed the pipe and as the water was firmly sealed in and under the lino I didn't know until it started dampening the floor outside.
Of course a stupid amateur like me would not have dreamed of boxing in permanently a compression fitting, specially an isolation fitting, specially as the stopcock is aboy 2 feet away.
But I'm not a professional.
It's dried out, but needs a workman to redo the boxing and new lino
The gasman cometh.
Mike r
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Sounds like a nightmare on your end!
I've been having a poke about and at an uneducated guess I'd say it is justa surface problem... intend to lift the lino and let it dry... perhaps helping it along with a fan heater....
New kitchen being installed in january so hopefully get it sorted by then!
Thanks for the advice!
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On Sun, 26 Oct 2003 18:18:59 +0000 (UTC), "Dave"

I'd say that leaving the area open to fresh air will most likely be all that is needed - the dampness will disappear and there shouldn't be any long lasting effects now that you've got rid of the primary cause. You should see benefits within 24 hours, maybe up to a week before it properly dries out.
The process can be assisted by having a fan blowing air across the area in question - and a warm stream of air would help further, though don't be tempted to turn the afterburners on because drying out too rapidly could cause the floor to crack - just a gentle warmth rather than Sahara Desert temperatures.
The only issue would be if the dampness has been there a long time, in which case the floor could have become saturated, and who knows what chemical reactions might occur then?
PoP
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Dave wrote in message ...

It'll be fine when it dries. If you can leave the machine out and lift the lino, it would speed up the process.
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