Spax vs TurboGold (Pozidriv)

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I just got my first box of TurboGold screws from Screwfix. Although they've already been discussed on this board in various threads, I just thought I'd add that after a quick test, they are fantastic.
I've just driven a few 4x30's in to some pine during my lunch-hour and wow!! I got progressively closer to the edge and they only split the wood when the head diameter was within a couple of millimeters of the edge (no pilot hole or countersinking).
The Spax were splitting the wood a good 2cm away from the edge.
They are the only screws I'm going to use from now on.
BTW, I also want to send a collective thanks out to all the regulars on this group! After reading this group for a few months I now feel confident enough to do some simple plumbing tasks (I've always been happy with electrics and feel quite confident with simple woodworking). Thanks!
Cheers,
Andy
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Hello Andy

Agreed, been using them for ages.
Downsides:
1. The odd infilled head. Not a problem, perhaps 1 per box. 2. When used in external conditions they do rust. Takes a year or two to show first signs. Too rusted to remove enitire after 4 or 5 years (3 in very damp conditions.) But then, not many non-brass screws will resist the elements for very long, the exception being heavily galvanised "farm screws". I did a load of goldscrews on stable doors a while back, had to replace them all. 3. Easy to snap off heads if you're not religious about torque control, and even then in dense wood they'll snap off way before they're home. Predrill in hard wood, or use a thicker shank.
But yes, they're good. I also use Twinthread a lot, also good. Better for higher loads since the shank's thicker - but that means it splits the wood quicker. Horses for courses. :)
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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Yes, I would guess it's about that too.

I've started using the stainless steel version of TurboGold for outside work now, the only problem with them is that they don't come in such big sizes.

used previously.
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Chris Green

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:
Hello snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk

Ah, problem - I'm a cheap bugger. :)
Are they much more expensive?
The heavy galvanised ones work really well even in hostile environs like urine soaked wood. Probably not as bad as saltwater conditions though, where stainless is pretty much all that's used as I understand it.

Maybe I'm getting them confused. (It's raining and the packs are in the car, excuse me for not being bothered to go and check...). Really skinny shanks with excessively sharp ends?
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 15:40:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

For hardwoods it's better to predrill anyway.
For outside work, I tend to use stainless steel, but you have to be a bit careful with torque with those as well.

.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

On that subject, have you ever come across a supplier of SS Torx drive screws? Seems an ideal combo to me, given how easily I tend to round off SS pozi heads.
--
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I'm pretty sure I've seen Torx SS machine screws and self tappers, but not woodscrews.
In the U.S. I've seen SS woodscrews with a Richardson square drive. You can even get them on bandoliers for screw guns.
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

Definitely machine screws - I have a whole load of them.

How does square drive (never used it) do in terms of binding? That's a big problem with tight fitting allen heads.
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It works fine.
I have a Senco Duraspin cordless screwdriver for collated screws:
http://www.duraspin.com/tool_ds200_14v.html
I was planning my workshop project at the time which involved T&G boarding the roof area of the garage, attaching ply to the walls and into the bargain T&G boarding the loft in the house. This added up to a *lot* of screws, so I bought the screwdriver together with a cordless Rotazip type tool in Home Depot for about $150.
http://www.duraspin.com/tool_ss_14v.html
I also bought several buckets of screws - you can get either square or Phillips drive and in various materials and lengths including SS. There are fixings for drywall to wood or metal, wood to wood, exterior and so on.
http://www.duraspin.com/screws.html
It works extremely well and does a good job. You can buy the tools here now, but they are a touch more than 200 unfortunately. The screws are reasonably priced, though, considering the convenience.
I am pretty sure that binding is avoided by having a very slight taper on the bit and the sockets - imagine it like a pyramid on a square base with the top removed.
The collated screwdriver is designed so that the bit engages the socket before there is significant torque through driving the screw, then there is a clutch which disconnects the drive at the right time.
You can also drive this type of screw manually. I've got some hex type bits that fit them.
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

Wow! That's what I call value.
We miss out on a lot of tool bagains over here :-(
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In the context of the time it saved, definitely

Especially with $1.85 to 1
.andy
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B&Q had a PP Pro collating gun for 38 about 6 months ago.
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I tried one out in the store. It's crap.

.andy
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Is it still available? At 38 you should not expect an RR, but for a one off job, it sound good value.
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I don't think so. They just had an odd one on display and a couple on the shelf a few months ago - I haven't seen it since. The mechanism didn't work very well and the clutch didn't. I suppose it might be OK for a one time job and chuck away.

.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

It was discontinued (due to extreme crapness). Too many poor tolerance parts. They were in clearance at 16 but that couldn't tempt me after having a go in store.
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The attachment below is brilliant for using a lot of screws. It locks the screw in so you can't round it off. You just plonk the screw into the unit, even when turning. It breaks off when the head is level with the wood it is being screwed into - adjustable depth. Use with an old mains drill and you have lots of driving power.
Hands Free Screwdriver Attachment & Push Hammer
Item Number 515938
QVC Price 18.12 UK Postage & Packaging 3.45
The automatic screwdriver attachment fits onto any power drill. The clutch and depth gauge setting lets you pre-set the screw depth and torque settings. the spring-loaded ball bearing mechanism holds screws tight, and the push hammer has a spring-loaded magnetic tube which is perfect for holding small nails and pins - meaning you won't hit your fingers. Three screwdriver bits (PH2, Slotted No.6, PZ2) are included.
http://www.qvcuk.com/ukgscripts/detail.dll?itemQ5938&frames=y&from=se
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IMM wrote:

I can't quite see how it works. Do you have one? How does it work?
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A friend of mine has one, I had a go. It is a stainless steel cylinder, as per the piccie. One end goes in the chuck. The other end you just plonk the screw in and steel balls on springs grab it. When you put pressure on it, it becomes locked in. When the screw is level with the wood it breaks off (can be before, so proud, or countersunk). He saw a demo and the demonstrator screwed in over 60 screws in a minute, and all heads were totally level with the wood. He never let off the power trigger.
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IMM wrote:

I saw this being demonstrated too and it did appear to be very good. My Dad pointed out that he had picked up one from a pound shop a few years ago, however that kept jamming. I think he admitted that if it hadn't jammed so often, it would have been good. Question is though - is the pound shop variety (of possibly questionable quality - though some things seem to be good) enough to put you off a more expensive variety.
Something I do remember seing the demonstrator doing was that he kept operating the spring loaded collar which releases the balls. He was doing this 2 or 3 times between screws. This was when my Dad pointed out the jamming of his one. I wonder whether its possible that it jams if you don't keep flicking the collar back and forth.
Its something I now look for on QVC - see what the operator is doing whilst talking about something else and the camera isn't directly on his hands. I noticed a 'Pengiun' hand steamer thing which kept pushing out loads of steam but the operator kept pumping the handle (presumably to build up pressure for the stream to come out more forcibly) every time the camera wasn't on close up. Does change your opinion of things when you see the 'pro' having to do more than he claims (ie. operate the collar 2/3 times between screws, keep pumping the handle to generate steam pressure).
D
Incidentally, isn't the 'push hammer' something that's been around for years?
D
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